Archive for May, 2014

MAMo Wearable Art

By
May 27th, 2014



One of the travel-inspired garments created from breadfruit fiber by Marques Marzan, shown at the Maoli Arts Month MAMo Wearable Art Show at Hawaii Theatre May 21. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

ONE OF THE TRAVEL-INSPIRED GARMENTS CREATED FROM BREADFRUIT FIBER BY MARQUES MARZAN SHOWN AT HAWAII THEATRE ON WEDNESDAY.

Fashion by Native Hawaiian designers Harinani Orme, Lauwa‘e, Maile Andrade, Manuheali‘i, Marques Marzan, Puamana Crabbe, Wahine Toa, and Manaola was presented during the annual MAMo Wearable Arts Show Wednesday at Hawaii Theatre.

The showcase of traditional and contemporary Hawaiian fashion, jewelry, textiles, prints, and Polynesian tattoos was part of Maoli Arts Month, presented by PA‘I, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and perpetuation of Hawaiian cultural traditions.

While the show was taking place on stage, traditional Hawaiian tattoo, or kakau, artist Keone Nunes was backstage performing a live demonstration of his craft for cameras, with footage screened in real time during breaks in the fashion show. I think most in the audience would agree we were thinking "ouch" in watching the process.

Marques Marzan, a cultural resource specialist at the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, always proves one to watch, this year inspired by his travels through Asia and the Pacific. Unlike those who design for commercial interests, the fiber artist explores different techniques of weaving and plaiting through his work. This year, he worked with breadfruit fiber and hemp textiles, as well as silk and kapa. Most intriguing were his hemp veils, using techniques employed in plaiting lauhala.

Models dancing to Pharrell Williams "Happy" demonstrated the comfort and unexpected aerobic quality of Manuheali'i clothing. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

MODELS DANCE TO PHARRELL WILLIAMS' "HAPPY" WHILE DEMONSTRATING THE COMFORT AND UNEXPECTED AEROBIC QUALITY OF MANUHEALI'I CLOTHING.

There was also a lot of enthusiasm on display during a Manuheali'i segment in which the models broke into dance to Pharrell Williams' "Happy." The energetic dance moves were a good indicator of the comfort factor of clothes you can live and move in,

It was a fun night, capped by a trunk show taking place at eleven44 on Bethel Street. Apparently, the show proved a good draw for sales of the clothing because there was a long line to get in!

Manaola designs by Carrington Manaola Yap encompassed a range of lifestyle apparel from underwear to casual daily wear to dramatic evening ensembles. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

MANAOLA DESIGNS BY CARRINGTON MANAOLA YAP EMCOMPASSED A RANGE OF LIFESTYLE APPAREL, FROM UNDERWEAR TO CASUAL DAILY WEAR AND DRAMATIC EVENING ENSEMBLES.

Woven veils by Marques Marzan. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

WOVEN VEILS BY MARQUES MARZAN.

Marques Marzan took a while getting to the trunk show at eleven44 that followed the MAMo Wearable Art Show. He was detained by many a well-wisher and the curious who wanted to know more about his designs and textiles. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

MARQUES MARZAN TOOK A WHILE GETTING TO THE TRUNK SHOW AT ELEVEN44 THAT FOLLOWED THE MAMO WEARABLE ART SHOW. HE WAS DETAINED BY MANY A WELL-WISHER AND THE CURIOUS WHO WANTED TO KNOW MORE ABOUT HIS DESIGNS.

Models for Harinani Orme were, from left, Keauhou Mitchell, Sarah Ing and Sierra Dew. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

MODELS FOR HARINANI ORME WERE, FROM LEFT, KEAUHOU MITCHELL, SARAH ING AND SIERRA DEW.

Models in textiles and accessories by mixed media artist Maile Andrade: Kahoku Lindsey, left, and Kaili Rattley. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

KAHOKU LINDSEY, LEFT, AND KAILI RATTLEY IN TEXTILES AND ACCESSORIES BY MIXED MEDIA ARTIST MAILE ANDRADE.

Models and musicians wearing designs by Big Island based Wahine Toa, by designer Nita Pilago, third from left. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

MODELS AND MUSICIANS WEARING DESIGNS BY BIG ISLAND-BASED WAHINE TOA, BY DESIGNER NITA PILAGO (THIRD FROM LEFT).

Here is video from the event:

This year, the show will travel beyond Oahu. On Saturday, designers Maile Andrade, Marques Marzan, Wahine Toa, Micha Kamohoalii and Keone Nunes will be featured at Kahilu Theatre in Waimea on Hawaii island. Tickets are $35 and $60; visit maoliartsmonth.org for more information.

On June 28, the Maui Arts & Cultural Center will welcome Keali'i Reichel, Maile Andrade, Manuheali'i, Marques Marzan, Wahine Toa and Keone Nunes. Tickets are $35 and $60; call (808) 242-2787 or visit mauiarts.org.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

HCC's 'C'est Si Bon'

By
May 23rd, 2014



Designer Randy Oribello, left, with the models for his Diable Rouge collection, after the Honolulu Community College fashion show that took place May 3. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Designer Randy Oribello, left, with the models for his Diable Rouge collection.

Another year brings another 14 designers from Honolulu Community College's Fashion Technology program to the public eye, and as a longtime observer of the fashion scene here, I have to say the students keep getting better and stronger.

Before, geographic isolation and a paucity of retail variety put would-be designers here at a disadvantage. As recent as six or seven years ago, students were churning out aloha shirts, business and cocktail attire, to address the rote needs of "the marketplace."

Today, the schools have loosened up in reaction to a fractured marketplace in which a designer who can spark consumers' imaginations can find his/her own niche.

And the HCC annual senior showcase that took place May 3, this year themed "C'est Si Bon," reflected these diverse niches, from the classic bridal and evening wear enthusiasts, to tea lovers, a passion for theatrical and film costuming, to those who have discovered the untapped potential of the menswear market. And Cynthia Verano spoke to a segment of the market many designers ignore: plus-size women who prefer style to sack dresses.

Chanteuse Ginai opened the French-themed show, with Eiffel Tower backdrop. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Chanteuse Ginai opened the French-themed show, with Eiffel Tower backdrop.

There was also some celebrity in their midst, with classmate Randy Abian Leano, a former "Project Runway Philippines" contestant, opening the show with "Ultra Vires (Beyond Powers)." The theatrical interpretation of the elements: Water, fire, earth, air and ether, showcased the designer's passion for music and stagecraft.

Also entertaining was Liberty Mae Dela Cruz's "Midnight Templar," an anime, manga and cosplay inspired collection of menswear that had me sitting as far back in my seat as possible, as each model brought out weapons larger than the ones before. Seated just a foot from the end of the runway, the last thing I needed or wanted was an adze in my head, y'know?

The shows are a good place to catch up with former HCC Fashion Technology graduates, like Rose Wolf, left, who is now working on dance and performance wear. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

The shows are a good place to catch up with former HCC Fashion Technology graduates, like Rose Wolf, left, who is now working on dance and performance wear. She's with Cynthia McArthur.

McArthur wears a bracelet created by Live Adorned designer Chun Hui Chen, left. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

McArthur wears a bracelet created by Live Adorned designer Chun Hui Chen, left.

Designers Randy Abian Leano, left, and Jacqueline Miszuk take their bows. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Designers Randy Abian Leano, left, and Jacqueline Miszuk take their bows.

Cynthia Verano, left, and Courtney Hamada take their walk down the runway during the show's finale. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Cynthia Verano and Courtney Hamada take their walk down the runway during the show's finale.

Kayoko Yamaoka, left, and Randy Oribello walk down the runway during the show's finale. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Kayoko Yamaoka, left, and Randy Oribello walk down the runway during the show's finale.

The students whose work was featured: Mary Jane Bayudan, Liberty Mae Dela Cruz, Emilee Gibo, Bryah Godoy, Courtney Hamada, Christopher Kim, Randy Leano, Jacqueline Miszuk, Lori Monden, Kathleen "Kat" Nakata, Randy Oribello, Uoleni Tupuola, Cynthia Verano, and Kayoko Yamaoka.

Here's a look at the shows in the order they were presented:

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instragram and Rebel Mouse.

Fighting Eel returns

By
May 19th, 2014



When Fighting Eel launches its summer collection Tuesday, it'll have the same cas­ual vibe the brand has been known for in its decade-long existence. The collection features many of the local brand's greatest hits, the styles customers continue to request.

But for the first time since founders Lan Chung and Rona Bennett pieced their early collections together by hand, production of the brand's collections is returning to Hawaii from Los Angeles.

Although Bennett said it costs more to ship fabric to Hawaii, the move will give them more control as to which colors and products to produce first — and with visitor-oriented traffic to their stand-alone boutiques in Kai­lua and Wai­kiki, Bennett said the ability to promote "Made in Paradise" garments will be a plus.

"We will definitely use it as a selling point for sure. I think it will make a difference. We know that everyone loves ‘Made in Hawaii' products," Bennett said.

Fighting Eel stores are at 1133 Bethel St., Royal Hawaiian Center and 629 Kailua Road.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; see her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instragram and Rebel Mouse.

Big on beauty

By
May 14th, 2014



There's a new beauty queen in town.

Alice Kim is the founder and president of Elizabeth Mott, a Hawaii-based beauty company with international aspirations. (Star-Advertiser photo by Craig T. Kojima)

CRAIG T. KOJIMA / ckojima@staradvertiser.com

ALICE KIM IS THE FOUNDER AND PRESIDENT OF ELIZABETH MOTT, A HAWAII-BASED BEAUTY COMPANY WITH INTERNATIONAL ASPIRATIONS.

Alice Kim has managed to parlay dissatisfaction with her puny lashes into the beginnings of an international beauty empire, as founder and president of Elizabeth Mott.

Kim said she went through tube after tube of different mascaras to find one that offered curling and lengthening without smudging or clumping.

Unable to find “the one,” she made do by borrowing a trick from makeup artists and launching the Lash Card in 2009. The sanitary shields are placed between lashes and eyelid while applying mascara, preventing smudging while also separating lashes for longer, fuller and more even results.

On the strength of the Lash Card, Kim grew confident that her search for the perfect products would resonate with other women, starting with mascara. Thanks to smart partnership with the subscription cosmetic service ipsy, founded by YouTube makeup sensation Michelle Phan, Elizabeth Mott's It's So Big mascara ($19.99) became an overnight hit when it debuted last September. It quickly rose to become the No. 2 best-selling mascara on Amazon.com, where it had to compete with such behemoths as L'Oreal and Maybelline.

Newer introductions include three Smooth Shadow gel liner pencils ($14.99) in “Raven,” “Pearl” and “Penny,” which has the sheen of a newly minted copper coin. There are also “pop! goes the shadow” eye shadows ($12.99 each) in “Stars at Night,” a shimmery black; “Champagne,” a highlighter; and “Antique Brass,” a shade to build depth.

Enter to win some of Elizabeth Mott's eye-enhancing products. (Star-Advertiser photo by Craig T. Kojima)

CRAIG T. KOJIMA / ckojima@staradvertiser.com

ENTER TO WIN SOME OF ELIZABETH MOTT'S EYE-ENHANCING PRODUCTS.

I love how the products are as easy to use as promised and work so well together to create a naturally beautiful look. The creamy, rich formulas also have the feel of a luxury brand, though at department store prices.

Kim explained, “I’ve been in stores where you have endless choices so you end up not knowing what you want. With Elizabeth Mott, I tried to come up with desert island favorites. This is what you want to have with you in any situation.”

Admittedly eye-centric because of her own needs, Kim said the next product from Elizabeth Mott, due in a few months, will “have something to do with lips,” with more to come in May 2015.

In the meantime, she'd like two lucky Fashion Tribe readers to try some of her products, so if you're interested, please leave a comment and you'll be entered in a drawing to win Elizabeth Mott products. The deadline for comments is 4 p.m. May 16.

On Oahu, Elizabeth Mott products can be found at Belle Vie in Wai­kiki, In My Closet at Kahala Mall and Pearlridge, Etch Salon, the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel Khakara Spa, The Spa at Trump Waikiki, Abhasa Spa at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, Global Village in Kailua, Beyond Bare at Ala Moana Center and Gara's Beauty Image in Aiea. A complete list of national retailers can be found at http://www.elizabethmott.com.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instragram and Rebel Mouse.

APDM Fashion Show

By
May 9th, 2014



Models in Tori Speere's "Wind Swept" designs. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Models in Tori Speere's "Wind Swept" designs. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Seven University of Hawaii at Manoa senior designers presented their own collections, plus a finale of “Reinvented Culture” and “Rational Science”-themed shows as part of the school's annual Apparel Product Design and Merchandising (APDM) Program fashion show, this year themed “Reverie: Daydreams Set Adrift.”

The event took place at Waikiki Beach Marriott Resort & Spa on April 27, starting with a silent auction of items contributed by such companies as Hilo Hattie, Valerie Joseph, Jams World, 'Iolani, Maui Jim, Maui Divers, San Lorenzo and more, as an example of established brands lending a hand to the next generation of designers.

Camille Lanier's "Dead Film Star" menswear collection. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Camille Lanier's "Dead Film Star" menswear collection. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Romance and ruffles were the heart of Sarah Yamashige's "Redamancy" collection. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Romance and ruffles were the heart of Sarah Yamashige's "Redamancy" collection. (Star-Advertiser photo by Nadine Kam)

Here is a look at the finale of “Reinvented Culture” and “Rational Science”-themed shows. The former imagines the intersection of folklore and sustainability, while the latter combines geometry and the technology of LED lights as one vision of our fashion future.

The individual collections follow in the order they were presented.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; see her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instragram and Rebel Mouse.

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives