Archive for September, 2014

Denim saves the day for Zamora

By
September 25th, 2014



The episode opened with the male designers at home longing to work with their regular models again after last week's twist of working with children.

PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIMEKini Zamora with his model/muse on the runway.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' SEASON 13

Episode 10: Muse on the Street

Hawaii designer Kini Zamora expressed happiness over last week's win and said in an on-camera interview that at home people live paycheck to paycheck so winning the competition and its $100,000 grand prize would change everything.

The designers then met with a representative from Mary Kay cosmetics who reiterated that beauty is in the eye of the beholder and with that, they are sent to Washington Square Park to look for real world models for a makeover challenge.

The competition is about transformation, so the designers are told they should not be looking for runway models but real women who could demonstrate the transformative power of clothing and grooming. The winning designer and muse would be featured in a Mary Kay advertisement in Marie Claire magazine.

Some of the designers had problems finding a person to agree to be a model, and Zamora is relieved when one girl says yes. But in talking to her, she said she doesn't dress up unless she has to, and she likes wearing tie dye and boho clothing — which is incompatible with his sleek, structured aesthetic and leading him to worry, "Oh boy, that isn't my style at all. Maybe I picked the wrong person."

In the workroom he is stuck, and Sean Kelly noticed he wasn't his usual self, silent instead of talking and laughing.

Then Zamora had an aha moment when he thought of his mom and her advice to avoid going overboard. Remembering her humble style, he thinks of going back to denim, which he had used for earlier collections at home.

He came up with a denim on denim look of a dark denim jacket over a paler chambray dress that he imagined as a date-night outfit.

During the judging, Zac Posen praised Zamora's look as being "perfectly polished." Host Heidi Klum said she appreciated that Zamora's model, "Looks real" and not as if she had been dressed by someone else.

Judge Nina Garcia called Zamora's jacket "phenomenal," if casual by her date-night standards. Duh, different generation and income bracket. Hello.

Zamora ended up in the top three again and said, "Thank God for denim. It saved me."

But Korina Emmerich won for a motorcycle jacket and skirt ensemble. And the youngest designer, Alexander Knox, was sent home for a midriff top and circle skirt ensemble in too-heavy fabric. It was his second design after starting all over after mentor Tim Gunn described his first creation as hideous. (It was.)

Korina Ennerich won for motorcycle jacket ensemble and total transformation on this woman on the street.

Korina Ennerich won for motorcycle jacket ensemble and total transformation on this woman on the street.

 Alexander Knox went home for these heavy separates that were too light on design.


Alexander Knox went home for these heavy separates that were too light on design.


I also liked Emily Payne's dress and jacket that the women judges deemed too costumey and theatrical, but that designer Zac Posen also appreciated as a wow moment.


I also liked Emily Payne's dress and jacket that the women judges deemed too costumey and theatrical, but that designer Zac Posen also appreciated as a wow moment.

Gunn has become less tactful and more direct with his criticisms lately. I like it. I think it's more real.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Zamora on a roll with second win

By
September 19th, 2014



Lifetime photosKini Zamora shows his American Girl design on the runway.

COURTESY LIFETIME

Kini Zamora shows his American Girl design on the runway.

This week, the "Project Runway" designers met up at Manhattan's American Girl store where each was matched with an American Girl doll and the child model carrying the doll.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' SEASON 13

Episode 9: American Girl Doll

Hawaii designer Kini Zamora is lucky because his doll Samantha's back story is that of an orphan who is adopted into a wealthy household, offering plenty of potential to showcase his upscale couture style.

Right away, he started working on a houndstooth coat of bouclé fabric, and a white dress. Mentor Tim Gunn worried the two together looked "too mature" for a little girl, and while Kini said he doesn't do "flirty," he changes course, using the red check fabric provided by American Girl.

Even though he's designing for a girl, he can't give up his structured aesthetic.

Working quickly as usual, by the time he is done he has created a coat dress, top and skirt. Later, when Amanda Valentine finished early, leaving her time to handstitch details, she noted of the relaxed feeling, "This is what Kini must feel like every week."

During a break, the designers talked about their own experience with dolls. This is how we learn of the evolution of Kini's hairstyle. He said he played with troll dolls and their hair, and revealed that is the inspiration behind his tuft of blond hair!

Troll dolls were fads that emerged in the early 1960s, and again in the 1970s through '90s.

Troll dolls were fads that emerged in the early 1960s, and again in the 1970s through '90s.

The judges were won over by Kini's pieces which were appropriate for his poor little rich girl doll, who he imagined as having no one to play with — but she does have a credit card. Designer Zac Posen described the ensemble as "Chanel meets Vivienne Westwood," and guest judge Elizabeth Moss of AMC's "Mad Men" asked whether American Girl will be recreating the pieces for 31-year-olds.

He is the hands-down winner and said he's happy to be on a roll that may lead to another win, and another until he wins the entire season.

This is the look that gets Sandhya Garg sent home.

This is the look that gets Sandhya Garg sent home.

Sandhya Garg finally got offed for a look the judges described as a Teletubbie onesie.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Namba scores 'Wheel' exposure

By
September 19th, 2014



Hawaii designer Anne Namba will get some sweet screen time when "Wheel of Fortune" episodes recently shot on the Big Island air in November and February.

COURTESY SONY PICTURESVanna White wore an Anne Namba gown on “Wheel of Fortune” shows taped on the Big Island.

COURTESY SONY PICTURES

Vanna White wore an Anne Namba gown on “Wheel of Fortune” shows taped on the Big Island.

Co-hosts Pat Sajak and Vanna White were in Waikoloa with 195 staff and crew from Los Angeles through Wednesday for tapings of the long-running game show.

This trip marks the fifth time "Wheel of Fortune" has been on location in Hawaii, and the third time taping at the Hilton Waikoloa Village.

The episodes will air between Nov. 3 to 14 and Feb. 9 to 20.

White, who is known for the dazzling gowns she wears on the show, will be wearing three outfits by the local designer, as well as other fitting looks by Tommy Bahama.

It's a process that started in June, when White's stylist, Kathi Nishimoto, contacted Namba, who shipped designs for fittings in L.A. in August.

In a phone interview Sunday from the Big Island, White, 57, said the fittings are necessary because she's a petite 5-foot-6 and most designer samples are intended for 6-foot-tall models.

"Most of the time the dresses need to be hemmed, and I need to make sure the outfits allow me to lift my arms to reach the top row of the puzzle board," she said.

"Wheel of Fortune" began airing in 1975 and is now ranked as the longest-running syndicated game show in the United States.

White joined "Wheel" in 1982 and quickly set off Vanna mania with her glamorous and ever-changing wardrobe. The show's website includes a Vanna's Links section under the Backstage menu with photos of recent dresses.

"I don't know how that happened, but after 32 years and 6,000 gowns, I've worn a little bit of everything and never repeated a dress," she said.

That makes the extra attention she received from crew members over Namba's designs all the more remarkable.

"Everyone's been really impressed by Anne Namba's clothing. They're so beautiful but they're also comfortable, and for me that's great," White said.

"I'm a very simple girl. When I'm not working, I like to wear sweats and blue jeans."

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Every fragrance tells a story

By
September 18th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAtelier Cologne was one of the brands featured during Project Beauty at Neiman Marcus.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Atelier Cologne was one of the brands featured during Project Beauty at Neiman Marcus.

Neiman Marcus hosted its Project Beauty event Saturday to introduce some of the fall season's best skin care, fragrance and cosmetic lines.

My morning started with breakfast with Christophe Cervasel, creator of Atelier Cologne, who shared his philosophy and the stories behind his Cologne Absolue, pure perfume celebrating the fresh elegance of citruses, the traditional cologne ingredients. A high concentration of essential oils to ensure lasting power.

After several years creating fragrances for everyone from Kenzo Parfumerie, to John Galliano and Jimmy Choo, Cervasel and his wife Stephanie Ganter—who worked for Fresh—decided to form their own company and launched their first fragrance in 2010.

Behind each scent is an elaborate story, "A great moment you want to remember forever," he said.

"We create the story, than choose the notes we decide are perfect for that moment in life."

His stories are of rendezvous between a woman who steals diamonds for the poor, and the secret agent whose heart she captures.

Even so, Atelier Cologne scents are considered unisex. "We never like to day it is for a man or a women because the choice is personal," he said.

Atelier

Atelier Cologne founder Cristophe Cervasel with his Rendez-Vous Cologne Absolue (pure perfume).

He said it is best to think of scents as a wardrobe that one changes with the occasion. "I couldn't live without it. I would feel a little bit naked, like I forgot my glasses."

He said his orange-scented Grand Néroli is great for starting the day fresh, while in the evening one might switch to Vanille Insensée or Vétiver Fatal. When he travels, he likes to wear Gold Leather, with its notes of rum and tobacco.

It takes a while to develop each fragrance, and of this, Cervasel said.

"Paris is slower. We do things slower than Americans, but maybe it lasts longer."

After breakfast at the Mermaid Bar, we went down to the retail floor for a sampling of the fragrances, so beautiful it was difficult to hone in on one particular scent. I was torn between the mystery of Rose Anonyme and the "woman who steals diamonds," and languid Cédrat Enivrant, telling of friends who reunite after several years with a scent as fresh as a mojito with a touch of joy and bittersweet nostalgia. Amazing fragrances.

POSTCARD COURTESY ATELIER COLOGNE Fragrance evokes memories of good times and moments shared.

COURTESY ATELIER COLOGNE

Fragrance evokes memories of good times and moments shared.

Those who made an Atelier Cologne purchase could receive a travel spray and monogram case.

Those who made an Atelier Cologne purchase could receive a travel spray and monogram case.

But I absolutely fell in love with Silver Iris. Then I learned its story:

“A woman of such intimidating beauty and sparkling vitality gained the adoration of everyone around her. However, no one knew what she had been through. With her wild spirit, she was tough, stronger than metal, and never looked back. When she met him, for the first time in her life, she could stand still. She may have found the absolu man.”

Knowing of my story, my friend said she got chicken skin when she heard it.

And that is what you want from a scent, Cervasel said.

"We just want to talk about emotion. Do you feel something?

Another of the breakfast guests, Christine Chee-Ruiter, said she studied the neuroscience behind our sense of smell at Caltech and that it is a chemical stimulus that affects every cell and every form of life.

She said she knows one woman who wears a new fragrance for each boyfriend and keeps the bottles as reminders of the relationship.

Because the olfactory bulb has access to the amygdala, which processes emotion, and the hippocampus, which is responsible for associative learning, "That's why works to tie one scent to one person," she said.

"It brings you right back in time."

Grace Lee speaks with Tom Ford representative Todd Davidson during the Project Beauty runway presentation.

Grace Lee speaks with Tom Ford representative Todd Davidson during the Project Beauty runway presentation.

Also going on that day, Hawaii News Now's Grace Lee hosted a beauty presentation with drawings for luxury beauty baskets from Dior, Tom Ford, Kiehl's, Cle de Peau, Bobbi Brown and Atelier Cologne.

Beauty products on the runway.

Beauty products on the runway.

Breakfast included chicken and waffles, and below, lox on latkes.

Breakfast included chicken and waffles, and below, lox on latkes.

nm lox

Fall celebrations continue with the CUSP Event, Thursday through Sunday on the store's Level One. There will be informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. daily through Saturday. Make a $350 regular-priced contemporary purchase in CUSP and receive a set of three bracelets. Get an additional $50 off for a purchase of $500 or more. There will also be light refreshments and makeovers by a Tom Ford makeup artist from 1 to 4 p.m. daily through Saturday, and there will be a photo booth from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Izukura shows his colors

By
September 16th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAn installation of natural fiber forms by Akihiko Izukura is on view at the Kapiolani Community College campus.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

An installation of natural fiber forms by Akihiko Izukura is on view at the Kapiolani Community College campus.

Kyoto-based textile artist Akihiko Izukura has returned to present "Life in Colors of the World," and installation and collaborative project taking place at Kapiolani Community College through Sept. 25.

Izukura is offering the opportunity to participate in hands-on workshops he will oversee from 10 a.m. to noon daily through Friday. He is seeking 400 participants to help unspool silk cocoons used to make silk squares that will eventually be woven together to form one large piece. The work will take place in front of the KCC library.

Local textile artist Reiko Brandon's work is featured in the KCC library, and she explained that each square comprises five to 20 of the silk cocoons, which come from a Big Island farmer who processes them humanely, cutting them in a way that allows the moth to emerge alive.

Students modeled Izukura's creation during an informal fashion show. Below is a detail of the weave of the purple dress.

Students modeled Izukura's creation during an informal fashion show. Below is a detail of the weave of the purple dress.

textile purple

The artist with one of his fine creations. He is due to head to the Arab Emirates to help reestablish a weaving tradition lost to wars.

The artist with one of his fine creations. He is due to head to the Arab Emirates to help reestablish a weaving tradition lost to wars.

Izukura shared a photo of the making of one of his wool pieces, with the help of nature. It was tumbled in river water. The coat is shown below:

Izukura shared a photo of the making of one of his wool pieces, with the help of nature. It was tumbled in river water. The coat is shown below:

textile wool

Izukura used a pre-contact fisherman's weave to create this dress. He explained through an interpreter that no knots were used, so when fish landed in such nets, it was soft and they didn't struggle against it.

Izukura used a pre-contact fisherman's weave to create this dress. He explained through an interpreter that no knots were used, so when fish landed in such nets, it was soft and they didn't struggle against it.

A closer look at the weave.

A closer look at the weave.

On view in the KCC library, silk vessels by Reiko Brandon.

On view in the KCC library, silk vessels by Reiko Brandon.

More of Brandon's work incorporating kapa and silk fiber.

More of Brandon's work incorporating kapa and silk fiber.

The collaboration project is also a competition between Izukura and Brandon. Brandon will create an entire piece comprising these silk squares. Izukura is inviting 400 members of the community to help create individual squares for his piece.

The collaboration project is also a competition between Izukura and Brandon. Brandon will create an entire piece comprising these silk squares. Izukura is inviting 400 members of the community to help create individual squares for his piece.

The silk cocoons.

The silk cocoons.

I was able to attend Monday's opening at the KCC cafeteria, where the eco-conscious artist enlisted students to show some of his beautiful wearable art pieces and scarves that were available for sale after the show.

I just love his work and pick up something every time he visits. He works with natural fibers such as silk, wool and plant fibers, and uses natural dyes also derived from plants and insects. The textures are beautiful and I just want to cocoon myself in them.

He will be hosting a larger trunk show and sale from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 in the Ala Moana Hotel's Plumeria Room. Cash or bank check only.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her onTwitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

On the 'Five-0' red carpet

By
September 14th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comThe cast of "Hawaii Five-0" on stage prior to the Sunset on the Beach preview screening of the series premiere, which also featured a mini concert by Bush, who also provides a track in the opening episode.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

The cast of "Hawaii Five-0" on stage prior to the Sunset on the Beach preview screening of the series premiere, which also featured a mini concert by Bush, who provides a track in the opening episode.

When you work in Hawaii, you don't need to pay all that much attention to fashion, even if you're a celeb.

During the "Hawaii Five-0" Sept. 13 season five premiere event at Sunset on the Beach, most of the celebs seemed to have little clue about what they were wearing. Nevertheless, some hands-on body and label searches provided some answers.

First to arrive on the red carpet was Taylor Wily, who plays Kamekona on the series, with his family. His wife Halona said he's picky about what he wears, and this year the whole family dressed in Missing Polynesia to reflect their Samoan heritage. The prints they wore paid homage to Samoan tattoo designs and landmarks such as Leapia Harbor.

Taylor Wily and his family, from left daughter Tula, son YoungAisa and wife Halona, all in Missing Polynesia.

Taylor Wily and his family, from left daughter Tula, son YoungAisa and wife Halona, all in Missing Polynesia.

In another touching homage, Dennis Chun, who plays Sgt. Duke Lukela in the series, wore a Honolulu Police Department—I think tie bar that he wore on his lapel—that belonged to his father, the late Kam Fong Chun, who was a patrolman in the 1960s. He famously went on to play Chin Ho Kelly in the original "Hawaii Five-0."

Said Chun, "I think he would have loved to be here."

Something old, something new: Dennis Chun, who plays Sgt. Duke Lukela in the show, wore his father Kam Fong Chun's police pin dating to the 1960s, when he was a patrolman. Kam Fong went on to play  Chin Ho Kelly in the original series. A closer detail of the pin below:

Something old, something new: Dennis Chun, who plays Sgt. Duke Lukela in the show, wore his father Kam Fong Chun's police pin dating to the 1960s, when he was a patrolman. Kam Fong went on to play Chin Ho Kelly in the original series. A closer detail of the pin is below.

50 police

Though admittedly "not a fashion person," Grace Park, who plays Kono Kalakaua in the series, looked every bit the Hollywood pro in a goddessy green bias-cut satin gown from Versace, with slash seams throughout.

Although she's been missing from the red carpet in recent years, she said she felt comfortable being there.

"It's so mellow, no one is out here to tear you apart, coz why go through that?"

And executive producer Peter Lenkov only knew he was wearing a Tom Ford shirt, but could share more abot the season to come, including the return of "Lost" actor Terry O'Quinn.

With other "Lost" actors Daniel Dae Kim and Jorge Garcia already on board, Lenkov said, "They love Hawaii so much, they're coming to us."

More scenes from the red carpet on Saturday, and catch the Bush performance video at the end:

Grace Park in a satin, bias-cut dress intersected with bead-embellished slash seams from Versace's fall-winter 2014-15 collection.

Grace Park in a satin, bias-cut dress intersected with bead-embellished slash seams from Versace's fall-winter 2014-15 collection.

Alex O'Loughlin wore a black-on-black look from Dior Homme. He proved to be a good sport when this woman crashed the press line. He gamely posed for photos and said she was his girlfriend and hoped his wife didn't see her.

Alex O'Loughlin wore a black-on-black look from Dior Homme. He proved to be a good sport when this woman crashed the press line. He gamely posed for photos and said she was his girlfriend and hoped his wife didn't see her.

 Scott Caan dressed for the occasion in a shirt from Gitman Bros., a hat he picked up in Chinatown, Band of Outsiders slacks and Pierre Cardin shoes.

Scott Caan dressed for the occasion in a shirt from Gitman Bros., a hat he picked up in Chinatown, Band of Outsiders slacks and Pierre Cardin shoes.

Ian Anthony Dale, who plays Kono Kalakaua's beau on the show, gives an interview on the red carpet. He wore a suit by a Madrid designer discovered by his manager.

Ian Anthony Dale, who plays Kono Kalakaua's beau on the show, gives an interview on the red carpet. He wore a suit by a Madrid designer discovered by his manager.

Jorge Garcia said at past red-carpet events he felt embarrassed over failing to dress up as others did, so this time he put more effort into selecting this pleated Luciano Viscontin shirt, paired with slacks from Kramer's.

Jorge Garcia said at past red-carpet events he felt embarrassed over failing to dress up as others did, so this time he put more effort into selecting this pleated Luciano Viscontin shirt paired with slacks from Kramer's.

Teilor Grubbs, who plays Danno's daughter Grace Williams on the show, picked her own outfit for the premiere, a Ralph Lauren dress, Forever21 necklace and BCBG wedges. It was the first time her father Erik allowed her to wear such a heel, below:

Teilor Grubbs, who plays Danno's daughter Grace Williams on the show, picked her own outfit for the premiere, a Ralph Lauren dress, Forever21 necklace and BCBG wedges. It was the first time her father Erik allowed her to wear such a heel, below:

50teilor

The very personable Mark Dacascos, who plays Steve McGarrett's nemesis Wo Fat, posed for a photo with a fan on the red carpet.

The very personable Mark Dacascos, who plays Steve McGarrett's nemesis Wo Fat, posed for a photo with a fan on the red carpet.

The series Hawaii casting director Brent Anbe, in a Moods of Norway jacket.

The series Hawaii casting director Brent Anbe, in a Moods of Norway jacket.

PHOTO BY RASA FOURNIERAfter the "Five-0" episode screening, most of the stars left to party. Midweek arts writer Rasa Fournier and I picked up the closest vacated seats that had been reserved for Alex O'Loughlin and Scott Caan.

RASA FOURNIER / RASA@MIDWEEK.COM

After the "Five-0" episode screening, most of the stars left to party. MidWeek's Rasa Fournier and I picked up the closest vacated seats that had been reserved for Alex O'Loughlin and Scott Caan.

We stayed to watch Bush perform.

We stayed to watch Bush perform.

Click here for complete "Hawaii Five-0" Sunset on the Beach coverage from the Pulse.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Fall trends at Ala Moana

By
September 14th, 2014



PHOTO BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKelsey Campbell on the runway during yesterday's CH Carolina Herrera fashion show on the Ala Moana Center Stage.

PHOTO BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Kelsey Campbell on the runway during yesterday's CH Carolina Herrera fashion show on the Ala Moana Center Stage.

It may be sweltering on the street, but for retailers, the fall season is here.

Ala Moana Center has been showcasing the fall 2014 with its Fall Trend Event fashion shows underway through Sunday.

Also, if you're out spending, shoppers who redeem $200 in Ala Moana Center store and restaurant receipts dated Friday through Sunday will receive an exclusive clutch by local designer Jana Lam. Receipts can be redeemed at the Customer Service Center, one per person while supplies last.

Here's Sunday's schedule:

» Noon: Spiral Girl

» 1 p.m.: Macy's

» 2 p.m.: bebe

» 3 p.m.: Valerie Joseph

» 4 p.m.: Pepsi fashion show featuring designs by Honolulu Community College students

Other event highlights:

» Beijing Getaway: Enter for a chance to win a getaway for two to Beijing on Hawaiian Airlines, a four-night stay in the Four Seasons Hotel Beijing's ambassador suite and a $500 Ala Moana Center gift card.

Submit an entry form through day's end on Mall Level 2 near Louis Vuitton or by visiting www.facebook.com/ alamoanacenter. Must be at least 18 years old to enter.

» Give Back: The center will accept donations on behalf of Dress for Success Honolulu, a nonprofit organization that promotes economic independence for disadvantaged women by providing professional attire, a support network and career development tools.

Shoppers are invited to bring classic suits and separates, dresses, jackets and sweater sets, handbags, accessories and shoes, unused cosmetics, creams and toiletries to participating merchants: Ann Taylor, Dooney & Bourke, Folli Follie, LeSportsac, Maui Divers Jewelry, Tapestries by Hau'oli, Tommy Bahama and Valerie Joseph. Those who donate will have access to discounts and offers at select retailers.

For updates, visit alamoanacenter.com and follow @AlaMoanaCenter on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram via the hashtag #TFFE.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Zamora scores first win on rainway

By
September 12th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM AND LIFETIME / nkam@staradvertiser.comDesigner Kini Zamora is back in town after New York's Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, and gathered with friends and family to watch the latest episode of "Project Runway" at Pau Hana Lounge. As for what's new with the designer, check out my interview to appear in print Thursday.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Designer Kini Zamora is back in town after New York's Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, and gathered with friends and family to watch the latest episode of "Project Runway" at Pau Hana Lounge. As for what's new with the designer, check out my interview in Thursday's Honolulu Star-Advertiser.


The designers faced an avant garde challenge this week — with a twist. Instead of a normal runway, their designs had to be waterproofed for a rainway, a concept new to most of them.

The first time I saw a rainway was during Yohji Yamamoto's Adidas Y-3 New York Fashion Week show in the fall of 2007, when he made it rain under the yet-to-be-developed High Line.

We were like, "What?" as we waited for staffers with umbrellas to escort us to the bleacher seating.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' SEASON 13

Episode 8: The Rainway

Inspired by the idea of rain, Hawaii designer Kini Zamora – back in town following his showing on the Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week runway — set about creating an umbrella style skirt.

Once again, his main competitor was Sean Kelly, whose idea was a bit of genius, making use of the water in a way that would transform his garment. He created a very simple white dress, but poured Rit powder dyes into seams so that when water hit, it would start bleeding color.

He knew it was a risk, but one well worth taking. Even so, I thought it was somewhat derivative of the work of Alexander McQueen, who in 1999 had robots spray paint a white dress modeled by Shalom Harlow, who stood on a rotating platform so the pattern circled the dress. Now, THAT, was a remarkable moment.

Sadly, a lot of young designers today seem clueless when told they are referencing other designers because they haven't studied enough fashion history. I think if Kelly knew of McQueen's work, he might have created something other than a simple white dress to appear less like a copycat.

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARTAlexander McQueen's spraypainted dress.

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Alexander McQueen's spraypainted dress.

Kini Zamora with one of his Honolulu Community College  instructors, Joy Nagaue, who was able to attend the "Project Runway" New York Fashion Week show in my place.

Kini Zamora with one of his Honolulu Community College instructors, Joy Nagaue, who was able to attend the "Project Runway" New York Fashion Week show in my place.


And although Zamora's design was new to the judges, it's been done quite frequently here, particularly by a number of University of Hawaii at Manoa design students intrigued by the folds of origami.

Zamora's finished work, made of Lycra masquerading as glossy PVC fabric, looked something like a fetish-y dominatrix Catwoman meets "Wicked" character.

Amanda Valentine confessed to liking his garment when he said, "There's something creepy about it," before adding, "I like it. I kinda wish he would design like this for every challenge."

Judge Nina Garcia called his work "sublime," and judge Zac Posen praised his "skillful hand" and technique.

In the end, the judges could not decide between Zamora's and Kelly's designs, and both were declared winners. It was a great moment for Kini, watching the episode at Pau Hana Lounge with friends and family, who cheered and toasted his win. Someone remarked, loudly, "He should have won the last four!"

Sadly, Korina Emmerich should have been sent home for her grade-school Halloween project creation, but she had immunity, so Fäde zu Grau was sent home for his sportswear look. It was deemed too simple by the judges.

Judges admired Kini Zamora's design down to the gloves that judge Zac Posen deemed difficult to make.

Judges admired Kini Zamora's design down to the gloves that judge Zac Posen deemed difficult to make.

Sean Kelly's white dressed transformed in the rain with the help of Rit dyes inserted into seam lines.

Sean Kelly's white dressed transformed in the rain with the help of Rit dyes inserted into seam lines.

kelly transformed

Korina's creation may have been the worst of the season. She was fortunate to have had immunity.

Korina's creation may have been the worst of the season. She was fortunate to have had immunity.

Check out the video below of Alexander McQueen's "Savage Beauty" show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as video of the spraypainting robots.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Taking in McQueen's 'Savage Beauty'

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