Fashion Tribe

Izukura shows his colors

September 16th, 2014
PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAn installation of natural fiber forms by Akihiko Izukura is on view at the Kapiolani Community College campus.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

An installation of natural fiber forms by Akihiko Izukura is on view at the Kapiolani Community College campus.

Kyoto-based textile artist Akihiko Izukura has returned to present "Life in Colors of the World," and installation and collaborative project taking place at Kapiolani Community College through Sept. 25.

Izukura is offering the opportunity to participate in hands-on workshops he will oversee from 10 a.m. to noon daily through Friday. He is seeking 400 participants to help unspool silk cocoons used to make silk squares that will eventually be woven together to form one large piece. The work will take place in front of the KCC library.

Local textile artist Reiko Brandon's work is featured in the KCC library, and she explained that each square comprises five to 20 of the silk cocoons, which come from a Big Island farmer who processes them humanely, cutting them in a way that allows the moth to emerge alive.

Students modeled Izukura's creation during an informal fashion show. Below is a detail of the weave of the purple dress.

Students modeled Izukura's creation during an informal fashion show. Below is a detail of the weave of the purple dress.

textile purple

The artist with one of his fine creations. He is due to head to the Arab Emirates to help reestablish a weaving tradition lost to wars.

The artist with one of his fine creations. He is due to head to the Arab Emirates to help reestablish a weaving tradition lost to wars.

Izukura shared a photo of the making of one of his wool pieces, with the help of nature. It was tumbled in river water. The coat is shown below:

Izukura shared a photo of the making of one of his wool pieces, with the help of nature. It was tumbled in river water. The coat is shown below:

textile wool

Izukura used a pre-contact fisherman's weave to create this dress. He explained through an interpreter that no knots were used, so when fish landed in such nets, it was soft and they didn't struggle against it.

Izukura used a pre-contact fisherman's weave to create this dress. He explained through an interpreter that no knots were used, so when fish landed in such nets, it was soft and they didn't struggle against it.

A closer look at the weave.

A closer look at the weave.

On view in the KCC library, silk vessels by Reiko Brandon.

On view in the KCC library, silk vessels by Reiko Brandon.

More of Brandon's work incorporating kapa and silk fiber.

More of Brandon's work incorporating kapa and silk fiber.

The collaboration project is also a competition between Izukura and Brandon. Brandon will create an entire piece comprising these silk squares. Izukura is inviting 400 members of the community to help create individual squares for his piece.

The collaboration project is also a competition between Izukura and Brandon. Brandon will create an entire piece comprising these silk squares. Izukura is inviting 400 members of the community to help create individual squares for his piece.

The silk cocoons.

The silk cocoons.

I was able to attend Monday's opening at the KCC cafeteria, where the eco-conscious artist enlisted students to show some of his beautiful wearable art pieces and scarves that were available for sale after the show.

I just love his work and pick up something every time he visits. He works with natural fibers such as silk, wool and plant fibers, and uses natural dyes also derived from plants and insects. The textures are beautiful and I just want to cocoon myself in them.

He will be hosting a larger trunk show and sale from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 in the Ala Moana Hotel's Plumeria Room. Cash or bank check only.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her onTwitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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