Archive for September, 2014

A scary moment for Zamora

By
September 5th, 2014



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PHOTOS COURTESY OF LIFETIME Caption goes here. And here and here and here.

PHOTOS COURTESY OF LIFETIME

Kini Zamora's design is scrutinized on the runway.

This week, the designers walked into the studio to find showcases full of Chopard jewelry. The pieces became the inspiration for compatible evening gowns.

As last week's winning designer, Sean Kelly picked first and his choice was a show-stopping flared bib of what looked like giant sapphires and diamonds. Hawaii designer Kini Zamora went next and opted for a much simpler pair of diamond hoop earrings and a statement ring.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' SEASON 13

Episode 7: Priceless Runway

He received a lot of screen time this week, which in the "Project Runway" universe could mean he wins, or gets the boot. (Getting ahead of the series though, please see my previous post.)

Before the designers started working, mentor Tim Gunn walked into the workroom with news that he is using his one save to bring Char Glover, who was sent home last week, back into the competition. There are no more saves for the rest of the season.

Next, the designers took a field trip to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the exhibition, "Charles James: Beyond Fashion." The 20th century couturier was a master of innovative ball gowns and the exhibition offers insight into their construction.

Kini decided to do a hard/soft dress with a neoprene bustier minidress covered with floor-length draped silk chiffon. Mentor Tim Gunn worried about the bullet darts and expressed fear about the length, which he called borderline "hoochie." Later speaking to the cameras, Kini said he is not a hoochie designer.

On the runway, the judges spotted construction issues with Kini's work due to the nature of the neoprene and said they wished he had chosen different fabric. He ends up in the bottom three, but is lucky Samantha Plasencia created a plain gown that judges deemed boring.

At this point in the competition, taking risks are more important than playing it safe, and Kini is one week closer to New York Fashion Week.

Korina Emmerich picks up her first win for this gorgeous ensemble. I think she picked the most stunning jewelry piece that was perfectly suited to her design.

Korina Emmerich picks up her first win for this gorgeous ensemble. I think she picked the most stunning jewelry piece that was perfectly suited to her design.

Samantha Plasencia went home for a simple gown judges said looked more like what an intern would wear, rather than an important person.

Samantha Plasencia went home for a simple gown judges said looked more like what an intern would wear, rather than an important person.

Zamora fans who want to watch next week's episode with the designer are invited to Pau Hana Lounge, 746 Kohou St. He'll be there to meet and greet with fans from 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

'Vampire' secret to eternal youth

By
September 4th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comRN Greta Torok draws blood from Martha Keith during a demonstration of the Vampire Facelift procedure at Honolulu MedSpa.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Nurse Greta Torok draws blood from Martha Keith during a demonstration of the Vampire Facelift procedure at Honolulu MedSpa.

From the birth of 19th-century vampire fiction through today, the specter of the blood-drinking undead has captivated mere mortals. In earlier times, vampires were creatures to fear. As portrayed in contemporary media — in everything from the “Twilight” book and film franchise to cable TV series — they are beings to admire for their eternal youth and beauty.

Now physicians offering skin and beauty treatments have taken inspiration from the vampire myth to come up with a novel way for men and women to maintain their youthful countenance. While the old stories speak of drinking blood as the vampire’s sustaining factor, Alabama emergency room physician Charles Runels devised a way to incorporate an individual’s own blood-derived growth factors to rejuvenate face and skin. His trademarked procedure is being used in medical spas throughout the world, including here at Honolulu MedSpa in Liliha, which performs Vampire Facelifts and Vampire Facials.

The MedSpa's founder and medical director Choon Kia Yeo learned of the treatment last year after Kim Kardashian had a semblance of the procedure done for the cameras on an episode of “Kim and Kourtney Take Miami.” The reality-TV star released dramatic photos of blood smeared across her face, which had nothing to do with the reality of the procedure. But since then, it’s become a popular procedure in Hollywood.

There is already precedence for use of micro-­needling and fillers to rejuvenate the skin and give faces more youthful contours. The only thing new is that instead of a commercial product or filler, with the Vampire Facial and Facelift, the substance used is a patient’s own blood, containing his or her own antibodies, enzymes, lipids, stem cells and human growth factors which Yeo calls “fertilizer for the skin.”

The blood is put into a centrifuge to separate its components and the yellowish blood plasma is used for the Vampire treatments.

The blood is put into a centrifuge to separate its components and the yellowish blood plasma is used for the Vampire treatments.

To start, a registered nurse draws 10 cubic centimeters of blood, enough to fill a test tube. The blood is placed in a centrifuge to separate platelets from red blood cells to yield five cubic centimeters of PRP, or platelet-rich blood plasma — a yellowish viscous liquid — to be used in facial or facelift procedures.

The plasma is injected into the skin through a micro-­needling process for the Vampire Facial, devised to improve the skin’s appearance, or combined with a filler product such as Juvéderm for the facelift procedure, which resculpts the face.

For the 45-minute facial, which costs $650 at Hono­lulu MedSpa, the micro-­needling employs the counterintuitive knowledge that injuring the skin with tiny perforations speeds improvement as the body rushes to repair the injury by producing collagen and elastin.

Emiko Miyazawa has the less invasive Vampire Facial, which involves use of a micropen to deliver the blood plasma serum through a series of micro needle perforations. After applying numbing cream, she described the sensation as being "prickly" but not painful.

Emiko Miyazawa has the less invasive Vampire Facial, which involves use of a micropen to deliver the blood plasma serum through a series of micro needle perforations. After applying numbing cream, she described the sensation as being "prickly" but not painful.

The blood plasma is spread over the skin, and a micropen containing 11 tiny needles is used to deliver the nutrient-rich plasma into the skin. Topical anesthesia is used to numb the skin to what patients describe as a “prickling sensation.”

The facelift, at $1,500, includes one syringe of a Juvéderm filler. The results are said to last up to 12 months, and up to two years for Juvederm Voluma XC, which is offered as an upgrade.

During the facelift, a patient’s plasma is mixed with Juvederm and injected with a blunt-tip cannula in areas of the face that need volume to re-create the taut fullness of youth. The filler provides the scaffolding that elevates skin, while the PRP is said to help stimulate tissue growth, although evidence of PRP's effects have been anecdotal.

Honolulu MedSpa is at 1650 Liliha Street, Suite 102. Call (808) 528-0888.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Gunn makes appearances in Waikiki

By
September 4th, 2014



Hawaii is a very small place, so "secrets" don't tend to stay secrets for very long.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TIKI'S GRILL & BARIn a post dated Aug. 21, Tiki's Grill & Bar welcomed "Project Runway's" Tim Gunn as a guest. Speculation is that he was in town to check on the progress of Hawaii designer Kini Zamora prior to New York Fashion Week, which began today.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TIKI'S GRILL & BAR

In a post dated Aug. 21, Tiki's Grill & Bar welcomed "Project Runway's" Tim Gunn as a guest. Speculation is that he was in town to check on the progress of Hawaii designer Kini Zamora prior to New York Fashion Week, which began today.


So, what can we deduce in light of a number of Tim Gunn sightings around town? I'm sorry, but a person who dresses like Tim Gunn isn't likely to remain incognito long when he pops up in Waikiki. And I really don't think he's here for the beach.

Gunn, of course, is the mentor to the competing designers in Lifetime television's "Project Runway." And one of our own, designer Kini Zamora, is still in the game.

Those familiar with the series know up to five finalists are sent home to create Fashion Week-worthy collections, and Gunn typically heads out for hometown visits to make sure the designers are on track. This takes place a few weeks before they are due back in New York City for Fashion Week and the show's finale.

There are usually three finalists, with one or two more designers thrown into the mix to act as decoys to keep the suspense factor high.

The New York shows started today and the "Project Runway" show is slated to take place tomorrow at 4 a.m. Hawaii time (10 a.m. EST). I managed to get a couple of people into the show in my place and they promised to send photos.

With many media outlets covering the event, we'll see every collection, though we won't know the placements of the designers until the show's finale. I really wish they would time the episodes to coincide with the fashion shows in real time, like they did in the very first season. Otherwise, the finale becomes a bit anticlimactic.

Meanwhile, keep up with official Mercedes Benz Fashion Week happenings here.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Joyful hearts come together

By
September 3rd, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com"Law & Order: SVU" star and Joyful Heart Foundation founder Mariska Hargitay was in town for a couple of events marking the foundation's 10th anniversary. She's with JHF CEO Maile Zambuto and Jason Zambuto.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

"Law & Order: SVU" star and Joyful Heart Foundation founder Mariska Hargitay was in town for a couple of events marking the foundation's 10th anniversary. She's with JHF CEO Maile Zambuto and Jason Zambuto.

Marking the 10th anniversary of the Joyful Heart Foundation she founded, actress Mariska Hargitay was in Honolulu for a benefit, as well as a picnic dinner event honoring foundation benefactors.

Hargitay, who portrays New York City detective Olivia Benson on “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” was inspired to start the foundation while vacationing in Kailua-Kona. She had always been moved by viewers response to the compassionate character she plays on television, which isn't far from her own heart. The aim of Joyful Heart is to help heal, educate and empower survivors of sexual assault, domestic violence and child abuse.

She is such a genuine person. Usually, I find the people behind such organizations to be glib and business-like because of the nature of fundraising, but she is such a believer in her cause and full of gratitude that people are willing to come together to help, that this is the second time I've seen her tear up talking about it.

I was able to attend a resort chic picnic event at a private home in Nuuanu, catered by Town restaurant. In honor of event underwriter Tori Richard, Ltd., guests were invited to show their support by donning Tori Richard attire, vintage or new.

During a resort chic-themed picnic dinner sponsored by Tori Richard Honolulu in honor of Joyful Heart benefactors, guests—including Jeanie Schmaltz, left, and Nalani Holliday—were invited to wear vintage or new Tori Richard garments.

During a resort chic-themed picnic dinner sponsored by Tori Richard Honolulu in honor of Joyful Heart benefactors, guests—including Jeanie Schmaltz, left, and Nalani Holliday—were invited to wear vintage or new Tori Richard garments.

I was invited to Tori Richard headquarters to try on some vintage dresses, excited by the possibility of seeing this secret trove. Even so, I thought it would be a long shot finding something to wear because, No. 1, I am short, and No. 2, 1960s and '70s styles are very slim so a combination of long length and narrow widths often don't work with a post-millenial body. It didn't matter because I have my own vintage and new-ish Tori.

The first one-shoulder dress I tried on was snug but with a green print suited to my coloration. I also tried on a mod purple-and-white mini that fit a little better in the middle, but my fitter seemed to like the first dress better, so I was sold.

Also dressed in Tori Richard, at a private home overlooking Nuuanu Stream, were, from left, Stephanie Johnson, Schmalz, Sherry Harper Wong and Andrea McTamaney.

Also dressed in Tori Richard, at a private home overlooking Nuuanu Stream, were, from left, Stephanie Johnson, Schmaltz, Sherry Harper Wong and Andrea McTamaney.

As I got dressed that night, I thought this is what it must feel like to be a movie star getting ready for a red-carpet event, when you're not in your own clothes and feel that little bit of self-consciousness. To me, behind the smiles, the stars always seem to exude a bit of uncertainty and discomfort on the red carpet.

Guests had the option of sitting at poolside tables, low lawn tables or picnic mats adorned by pillows with cases sewn from Tori Richard fabric. We picked up fresh fruit, salads, entree items and desserts at various tables and stations around the lawn and poolside.

Guests had the option of sitting at poolside tables, low lawn tables or picnic mats adorned by pillows with cases sewn from Tori Richard fabric. We picked up fresh fruit, salads, entree items and desserts at various tables and stations around the lawn and poolside.

Toward the end of the evening, guests were invited to make their own s'mores with assorted chocolate, chocolate-dipped bacon or panna cotta.

Toward the end of the evening, guests were invited to make their own s'mores with assorted chocolate, chocolate-dipped bacon or panna cotta.

Well, half the time I get invited to events, I'm not quite sure what they entail. I just get an outline, and this picnic really turned out to be a picnic with a mixture of low tables and lawn mats. Naturally, I have the sort of friends who want to try something different so we ended up sitting on the lawn, and if I knew that ahead of time I probably would have been more comfortable getting up and down off the ground in my own vintage Tori.

From left, Brittany Atiburcio, Midweek's Yu Shing Ting and I in Tori Richard.

COURTESY JASON ZAMBUTO / TORI RICHARD

From left, Waikiki Magazine account executive Brittany Atiburcio, Midweek's Yu Shing Ting and I in Tori Richard.

The aftermath: Yu Shing and I were among the last to leave. We were so comfortable on our picnic mat with Tori Richard pillows.

PHOTO BY BRITTANY J. ATIBURCIO / batiburcio@staradvertiser.com

The aftermath: Yu Shing and I were among the last to leave. We were so comfortable on our picnic mat with Tori Richard pillows.

Even though the dress I wore had a casual look, women of past decades exhibited more decorum, in part, because of the clothes they wore. They were constricting, nipping in the waist—with the help of girdles—and sort of putting a lot of emphasis on the bust—something I don't invite. The dress imposed good posture. These days, mass clothing allows us to be a little more lazy and slouchy. It's a different story with certain luxury brands and fits, that continue to demand decorum. It is one thing to understand this theoretically, and another to feel the difference.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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