Archive for October, 2014

Zamora scores another win

By
October 3rd, 2014



This week the designers were led to a Navy Yard where they were paired up in teams, each with $500 to bid on storage containers of random merchandise, which seemed to indicate they were real storage lockers being auctioned off.

PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME Kini Zamora was teamed with Amanda Valentine in this week's challenge.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' SEASON 13

Episode 11: The Highest Bidder

Some were packed with stuff. Others looked near empty. This was a team challenge and the other designers wanted to be paired with Hawaii designer Kini Zamora because of his speed. He's teamed with wacky Amanda Valentine and their easy-going natures seem compatible. Her rationale for bidding on one container was because it contained a colorful Yeti painting and he was willing to go with the flow and have fun.

I don't necessarily like her aesthetic, but as time goes on I like her more and more as a person.

Their locker is otherwise filled with children's toys; they remarked it's as if someone threw a party and stuck everything in storage afterward. It turns out to be their only win and it dawned on them that they now have no fabric to work with. They must make their own fabric with objects such as the canvas Yeti painting, soccer balls and plastic pool toys.

They are simultaneously nervous and relieved when mentor Tim Gunn introduced a twist to the challenge, which was coming up with a third design of fabric, which they could shop for at Mood.

Zamora started making a skirt with the soccer ball fabric and he and Amanda were happy with themselves, but during critique, mentor Tim Gunn feared they were dressing a teen-age hooker. So they rethought their designs and Zamora turned his skirt into a mini dress.

The judges, including "Project Runway's" biggest star, Christian Siriano, loved their inventiveness and sense of color and play. The soccer ball dress scored Zamora another win.

Kini's soccer ball dress scored him another win.

PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

Kini's soccer ball dress scored him another win.

Both the other teams had problems, but Korina Emmerich and Char Glover, from two different teams, found themselves on the bottom for looks judges deemed "too old" and "too hoochie," respectively, and faced a second challenge. They were given an hour to complete another dress.

Emmerich can't get over her resentment that Gunn had saved Glover before and never believed she belonged in the competition. Instead of focusing on her work, she focused on her anger and resentment. Her teammate, Emily Payne, was allowed to help, but Emily said Korina's comments and "bad energy" made her "not want to help her."

Judges felt Korina Emmerich fell back on Southwest style too many times.

Judges felt Korina Emmerich fell back on Southwest style too many times.


Emmerich believed she was the better designer and anything she puts on the runway will be better than Glover, but her negative attitude did flow into her work. When Glover's smart choices ended up in a pretty jersey dress with chiffon cape by teammate Sean Kelly, she's saved and Korina goes home.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Facial threading at Espoir

By
October 1st, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAt the newly open Espoir salon in Kaimuki, Emiko Singh offers an itodatsumou, or threading, treatment to remove facial hair.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

At the newly open Espoir salon in Kaimuki, Emiko Singh offers an itodatsumou, or threading, treatment to remove facial hair.

Threading originated in India and started gaining popularity in the West about a decade ago, primarily for shaping eyebrows.

In Japan, the procedure evolved as a technique for removing all facial hair. Itodatsumou, literally "thread hair removal," is now one of the services offered at the newly open Espoir salon in Kaimuki.

As the name implies, thread is used in the process, rolled and twisted over unwanted hair to pluck them at the root, a process that is said to stimulate capillaries, which in turn gets the blood flowing and promotes the production of collagen and elastin to help firm and tone skin.

The hair removal also helps to remove dead skin cells on the stratum corneum, the outermost skin layer.

During a grand opening celebration and demonstration that took place Sept. 23, salon owner Emiko Singh showed how it's done, starting with the application of a powder of hyaluronic acid, collagen and clay to reveal fine hairs.

After the hair removal, she finished with a cleansing and skin-tightening pepperment mask treatment. The basic treatment is $100 for 65 minutes. Maintenance treatments are $70 for 45 minutes.

Singh, who is on a mission to provide women with the hope of maintaining their skin well into their senior years, named her salon with the French word for "hope." She also offers relaxing European facials and korugi, a bone massage technique from Korea to reduce face size.

Salon owner Emiko Singh measures out lengths of fine threads in preparation for the threading treatment.

Salon owner Emiko Singh measures out lengths of fine threads in preparation for the hair removal process.

Twisting the string and intertwining hair removes both hair and dead skin cells on the surface of the skin, and is said to stimulate the hair bulb, activating capillaries to promote collagen and elastin production necessary for youthful-looking skin.

Twisting the string and intertwining hair removes both hair and dead skin cells on the surface of the skin, and is said to stimulate the hair bulb, activating capillaries to promote collagen and elastin production necessary for youthful-looking skin.

There was a rush to feel model Kae's smooth skin after the demonstration.

There was a rush to feel model Kae's smooth skin after the demonstration.

Espoir is at 3632 Waialae Ave., Suite 201, across from Goodwill. Call (808) 202-3443. The salon is open from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily by appointment only.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives