Archive for November, 2014

EuroCinema celebrates awardees

By
November 12th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAustralian actor Brenton Thwaites, dressed in Prada, arrived on the red carpet at the EuroCinema Hawaii Awards ceremony where he received the Rising Star Award.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Australian actor Brenton Thwaites, dressed in Prada, arrived on the red carpet at the EuroCinema Hawaii Awards ceremony where he received the Rising Star Award.

The 2014 EuroCinema Awards Gala took place Saturday at the Moana Surfrider, with former Bond girl Barbara Carrera on hand to serve as mistress of ceremonies, the recognition of Hawaii's best student film and the presentation of the Rising Star Award to Australian actor Brenton Thwaites.

Thwaites, who starred in "Maleficient" and "The Giver," is working on adventure thriller "Gods of Egypt" with Gerard Butler and has two more films, "Ride" and "Son of a Gun," in post-production.

EuroCinema Hawai'i, a "festival within a festival" within the Hawai'i International Film Festival, aims to advance cultural understanding and exchange between the peoples of Europe and Hawaii through film, as well as support future filmmakers of Hawaii with a generous sponsorship of $5,000 from the Sunny Dupree Family Foundation.

This year's winner, Kali Kasashima, who directed "N. King," received a $1,000 cash prize and a matching cash award for his school, the University of Hawaii Academy for Creative Media. Additionally, ACM will receive a new $3,000 production scholarship to be awarded to students based on screenplays and budgets reviewed by members of the EuroCinema Hawaii Board and the Sunny Dupree Family Foundation.

Actress Barbara Carrera arrived with EuroCinema Hawai'i president Jefferson Finney, left, and Jon Staub.

Actress Barbara Carrera arrived with EuroCinema Hawai'i president Jefferson Finney, left, and Jon Staub.

Roger and Julie Corman of New World Pictures arrive on the red carpet.

Roger and Julie Corman of New World Pictures arrive on the red carpet.

The juried winner was determined by the Golden Globes’ Aida Takla-O’Reilly, editor and composer John Ottman and producer Julie Corman.

The student nominees:

» Nicholas Bresnan: "Cadence," Henry J. Kaiser High School; https://vimeo.com/105828364 (Password: hiff)

» Erin Lau: "Day pass," University of Hawaii at Manoa, ACM; https://vimeo.com/100621793 (Password: HIFF)

» Kali Kasashima: "N. King," UHM ACM; https://vimeo.com/93328291 (Password: nKing)

» Paisley Mares (writer/director) and Kristin Briones (producer): "Winter for the May Queen," UHM ACM; https://vimeo.com/87987761 (Password: tofu)

» Jake Nowicki: "Bicycle," UHM ACM; https://vimeo.com/100373999 (Password: acm)

The evening's award winners:

» The Princess Dialta Alliata di Montereale Award for Best Film: "The Imitation Game," (UK/USA)

» Best Actor: Benedict Cumberbatch, "The Imitation Game"

» Best Actress: Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Italy's "Human Capital"

» Best Director: Morten Tyldum, "The Imitation Game"

» Best Student Film: "N. King," directed by Kali Kasashima

» The Prince and Princess Kawananakoa Rising Star Award: Brenton Thwaites, "The Giver"

» Lifetime Achievement Award”: Roger and Julie Corman, New Line Cinema (sponsored by Christina Hassell)

Kali Kasashima, director of "N. King," picked up the Best Student Film from Sunny Dupree, whose Sunny Dupree Family Foundation sponsors the annual award..Best Student Film: "N. King," directed by Kali Kasashima

Kali Kasashima, director of "N. King," picked up the Best Student Film from Sunny Dupree, whose Sunny Dupree Family Foundation sponsors the annual award.

From left, Barbara Carrera, Princess Dialta Alliata di Montereale and Jefferson Finney introduce the awards.

From left, Barbara Carrera, Princess Dialta Alliata di Montereale and Jefferson Finney introduce the awards.

Thwaites gamely posed with fans en route to the lawn where the awards ceremony took place.

Thwaites gamely posed with fans en route to the lawn where the awards ceremony took place.

Prince and Princess Kawananakoa Rising Star Award was presented by Quentin and Elizabeth Kawananakoa to Brenton Thwaites, accepting the award with Make A Wish recipient Annabelle Roberts, wearing a dress by Ari South.

Prince and Princess Kawananakoa Rising Star Award was presented by Quentin and Elizabeth Kawananakoa to Brenton Thwaites, accepting the award with Make A Wish recipient Annabelle Roberts, wearing a dress by Ari South.

On the red carpet are "Hawaii Five-0" executive producer Peter Lenkov, Angie Laprete and director Bryan Spicer.

On the red carpet are "Hawaii Five-0" executive producer Peter Lenkov, Angie Laprete and director Bryan Spicer.

Kristy Haskell, second from left, with husband Watters O. Martin, sponsored the award.

Kristy Haskell, second from left, with husband Watters O. Martin, sponsored the award.

Producer Chris Lee in Dolce & Gabbana with Jimmy Choo shoes and Prada tie.

Producer Chris Lee in Dolce & Gabbana with Jimmy Choo shoes and Prada tie.

Wayne Yoshigai, left, and John Schamber mark the occasion in Prada.

Wayne Yoshigai, left, and John Schamber mark the occasion in Prada.

More party-goers.

More party-goers.

Some of the night's edibles:

Chef Wayne Hirabayashi of Kahala Hotel and Resort was offering Hawaiian salt-spiced peanuts and popcorn in keeping with the movie theme, as s well as kataifi-wrapped Kauai shrimp, and below, Spanish paprika smoked tako poke in mini squid ink cones wrapped in metallic paper.

Chef Wayne Hirabayashi of Kahala Hotel and Resort was offering Hawaiian salt-spiced peanuts and popcorn in keeping with the movie theme, as s well as kataifi-wrapped Kauai shrimp, and below, Spanish paprika smoked tako poke in mini squid ink cones wrapped in metallic paper.

Euro octo

Chef John Matsubara, from the Hyatt Waikiki Resort & Spa's Japengo restaurant, offered irresistable pork chicharróns and chicken skin topped with Japengo Estate Spiced Honey from the Hyatt's rooftop apiary, Meyer lemon and Greek yogurt.

Chef John Matsubara, from the Hyatt Waikiki Resort & Spa's Japengo restaurant, offered irresistable pork chicharróns and chicken skin topped with Japengo Estate Spiced Honey from the Hyatt's rooftop apiary, Meyer lemon and Greek yogurt.

Chef Danny Chew, from Sheraton Waikiki's Rum Fire, offered smoked kampachi with shio koji, watercress puree and roasted lemon gel, and below, beef tenderloin with smoked tomato sauce.

Chef Danny Chew, from Sheraton Waikiki's Rum Fire, offered smoked kampachi with shio koji, watercress puree and roasted lemon gel, and below, beef tenderloin with smoked tomato sauce.

Euro tenderloin

On Kalakaua, the curious were drawn to the red carpet and limo arrivals.

On Kalakaua, the curious were drawn to the red carpet and limo arrivals.

Click here for more Pulse photos from this year's awards gala.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Get Out! features collaborations

By
November 12th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comShoppers at the popup shops at Hawai'i Convention Center had a little surprise help from the designers involved, including Tsu.ya's Kristi Yamaguchi, center, with Elizabeth Wen Tell. Yamaguchi helped Stephanie Matsumoto, left, make her sportswear selections. Visit http://www.tsuyabrand.com to shop. I especially liked her zippered, edgier take on leggings.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Shoppers at the popup shops at the Hawai'i Convention Center had a little surprise help from the designers involved, including Tsu.ya's Kristi Yamaguchi, center, with Elizabeth Wen Tell. Yamaguchi helped Stephanie Matsumoto, left, make her sportswear selections. I especially liked her zippered, edgier take on leggings.

Collaboration is one key to fashion success. The past weekend offered some spectacular shows at the Hawai'i Convention Center as part of Hawaii Fashion Month that showed what can happen with a mashup of local and New York talent, and when designers can broaden their horizons.

All too often in Hawaii, we work as individual islands. As small as many participating companies are, the word I got was that business owners still have the same reservations and concerns as the world's top brands when it comes to mixing up labels and worries about the company they keep.

Because each label often presents its own fashion show, what we usually see is one singular, myopic vision of a brand.

It's hard for any stylist to convince brands to mix it up, the way pieces are worn in real life, because no brand wants to water down its concept, but Hawaii-born, now New York-based stylist Don Sumada showed time and again how to mix it up with the kind of panache that gets attention.

John Koga was one of the artists, along with Lawrence Seward, who designed the pop-up shop at Hawai'i Convention Center, featuring garments, accessories and jewelry by local designers against the backdrop of the late Tadashi Sato's "Volcano."

John Koga was one of the artists, along with Lawrence Seward, who designed the pop-up shop at Hawai'i Convention Center, featuring garments, accessories and jewelry by local designers against the backdrop of the late Tadashi Sato's "Volcano."

Scarves by Kaypee Soh were among pieces featured in the popup shop.

Scarves by Kaypee Soh were among pieces featured in the popup shop.

Julie Chu and Courtney Coleman were there to represent Loco Boutique in a popup sponsored by H.I.S. Travel Agency.

Julie Chu and Courtney Coleman were there to represent Loco Boutique in a popup sponsored by H.I.S. Travel Agency.

Featured were pieces from Naissance, by Japan designer Takashi Kumagai, Saturdays Surf NYC, Sig Zane, Tsu.ya by Olympic gold medal figure skater Kristi Yamaguchi, AllisonIzu, Roberta Oaks, Meleana, Matt Bruening, and more.

The result, during the Get Out! show of casual, active and swimwear, was a fresh way of layering and accessorizing that lifts Hawaii out of regional wannabe category and into the realm of national- and international-caliber player.

More, please!

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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HCC's Nagaue wins Gov's Award

By
November 11th, 2014



Honolulu Community College fashion technology instructor Joy Nagaue is the recipient of the 2014 Governor’s Fashion Award, presented by Gov. Neil Abercrombie Sunday at the Hawai‘i Convention Center during Hawai'i Fashion Month.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comHonolulu Community College Fashion Technology Program educator Joy Nagaue received the 2014 Governor's Fashion Award from Gov. Neil Abercrombie.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Honolulu Community College Fashion Technology Program educator Joy Nagaue received the 2014 Governor's Fashion Award from Gov. Neil Abercrombie.

The award honors a professional who has served Hawaii’s fashion community for at least 25 years and has demonstrated leadership and innovation.

“Joy’s commitment to nurturing Hawaii’s fashion talent is unwavering,” said nominating committee member Amos Kotomori. “She usually works quietly behind the scenes, but her undeniable contribution to Hawaii fashion speaks volumes.”

An educator for HCC’s fashion technology program for 35 years and at its helm for 26 years, “Miss Joy” has taught and mentored many of the islands’ fashion talents, including three “Project Runway” contestants from Hawaii, designers behind brands including Manuheali‘i, and countless others who have gone on to successful careers.

“Joy has been like a mother figure for many of us who have gone through HCC’s program, offering guidance when we need it and maintaining close relationships with us even after we’ve graduated,” said “Project Runway” alum Ari South.

Miss Joy was congratulated by one of her former students, Danene Lunn, owner of Manuheali'i.

Miss Joy was congratulated by one of her former students, Danene Lunn, owner of Manuheali'i.

The selection of one of Hawaii’s leading fashion educators is consistent with the award’s goal of supporting the infrastructure and individuals that set the stage for the industry’s growth.

Nagaue, who earned her own degree in fashion design in 1969 at the University of Hawaii, said she was hired at Hilda Hawaii by a designer she admired, but days after she started, the designer quit, leaving her in charge. For her efforts, she was nominated for the Governor's Fashion Award during Gov. John A. Burns administration.

"I didn't win," she said.

Her competition at the time included industry heavyweights such as Dave Rochlen and Baba Kea, who I discovered through the newspaper archives when I first joined the staff at the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. I was so taken by her work that I tracked her down and invited myself to her North Shore home, just to talk story.

Nagaue received her award following an industry panel session on the future of fashion in Hawaii, featuring, from left, Surf Line Hawaii/Jams World CEO Mark Tsuda, Georja Skinner of the Creative Industries Division of the State Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism, and Xcel founder Ed D’Ascoli.

Nagaue received her award following an industry panel session on the future of fashion in Hawaii, featuring, from left, Surf Line Hawaii/Jams World CEO Mark Tsuda, Georja Skinner of the Creative Industries Division of the State Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and Xcel founder Ed D’Ascoli.

Nagaue said her key word for guiding students throughout their careers is "caring," and she takes an individualized, nurturing approach through those "ugly face" crying jags that inevitably happen, whether in class or career speed bumps.

Through the years I have seen her turn out to her students' events, finding her way to dingy bars and nightclubs where your shoes stick to the floor, all above and beyond the call of duty. That kind of dedication is rare and special.

Congratulations Joy for a well-deserved award!

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Neiman Marcus 'Art of Fashion'

By
November 8th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comNeiman Marcus presented "The Art of Fashion: The Best of Neiman Marcus" preview of resort and spring 2015 Nov. 7 at Hawai'i Convention Center.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Neiman Marcus presented "The Art of Fashion: The Best of Neiman Marcus" preview of resort and spring 2015 Nov. 7 at Hawai'i Convention Center.


Fashion lovers were treated to a spectacular preview of resort and spring 2015 fashion when Neiman Marcus hosted "Art of Fashion: The Best of Neiman Marcus" Friday at the Hawai'i Convention Center.

The retailer flew in samples direct from the world's top fashion houses such as Stella McCartney, Dolce & Gabbana and Giorgio Armani for the occasion.

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The show featured both men's and women's fashion.

The show featured both men's and women's fashion.


For those who missed the show, all of the runway looks will be available for viewing Saturday and Sunday in the Level 2 Designer Sportswear department. It will give shoppers an opportunity to plan their spring wardrobe updates and to place special orders on some of the pieces. There will also be informal modeling of the runway looks from noon to 2 p.m. both days.

While in the store, check out its seasonal "Love to Give Collection," featuring more than 50 holiday gift items from a range of designers and brands including Diana Vreeland Parfums, John Derian, Dylan’s Candy Bar, Eddie Borgo, Rizzoli, YSL, Kiehl’s, Jonathan Adler, Simon Pierce, Bedhead and Nest. Prices range from $22 to $395 and 10 percent of the sales of each of the gifts will benefit Diamond Head Theatre.

The Love to Give Collection will be available through Dec. 24, or while supplies last.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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MAMo show takes flight

By
November 7th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comHawaiian Airlines flight attendants dressed in uniforms past and present were at Hawai'i Convention Center Nov. 6, to help promote a 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8 runway show of uniforms through the airline's history .

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Hawaiian Airlines flight attendants dressed in uniforms past and present were at Hawai'i Convention Center on Thursday to help promote a runway show of uniforms through the airline's history.

Fashion has been a big part of Hawaiian Airlines since 1943, and one of the events marking the company’s 85th anniversary is a fashion show of all its flight attendant uniforms from past to present.

The event will open the MAMo (Maoli Arts Month Org.) Wearable Arts’ fashion show during Hawai‘i Fashion Month at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Hawai‘i Convention Center.

MAMo’s Wearable Arts Show will feature the designs and collaborations of seven native Hawaiian artists. Not a conventional runway show, the MAMo showcase always proves fun and exciting, integrating several forms of Native Hawaiian artistic expression, such as bamboo printing, feather and shell work, kapa and lauhala weaving, and body art, coupled with traditional Hawaiian chanting and dancing.

The featured artists are weaver and fiber artist Marques Marzan, designer Puamana Crabbe, jewelry designer Lufi Luteru, lauhala weaver Keoua Nelson,

designer Nita Pilago of Wahine Toa Designs, tattoo artist Keone Nunes, and feather artist Mele Kahalepuna-Wong.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comHawaiian Airlines first 1943 "air hostess" uniform is at far left. I got to see them upclose at the Hawaiian Airlines offices near the airport.

Hawaiian Airlines first 1943 "air hostess" uniform is at far left. I got to see them up close at the Hawaiian Airlines offices near the airport.

Here are some of the Hawaiian Airlines uniform details:

» In the beginning the airline flew without flight attendants. The first flight in 1929 was from Hono­lulu to Hilo and took three hours and 15 minutes on an eight-passenger Sikorsky S-38 amphibian airplane.

» The first “air hostesses” joined the crew in 1943, and their uniform was a war-era fitted gray skirt and jacket ensemble topped off with a military-style cap and black stripe on the sleeve.

» The designs became bolder and more colorful in the 1960s in response to the jet-set glamour of the burgeoning tourist industry, which at that time was the domain of the elite.

“All the flight attendants we talked to who were flying then said it was a very glamorous and prestigious profession, and dress was a part of that,” said Debbie Nakane­lua-Richards, director of community relations at Hawaiian Airlines. “The passengers dressed up, so the crews had to look just as good or better. The airline wanted to pro­ject an image of moving forward.”

Uniforms always came with several options so attendants could wear different looks as they wished. These ensembles, shown by Huy Vo, were created by Malia International.

Uniforms always came with several options so attendants could wear different looks as they wished. These ensembles, shown by Huy Vo, were created by Malia International.

The fashion always reflected what was happening on a national scale. In 1968, flower power reigned and flight attendants wore floral-print minis in a blue-and-yellow pattern that was matched to the formality of yellow hosiery.

Grooming was meticulous and all elements were considered, down to jewelry and footwear. To go with the flower power dress, David Evins of Evins Shoe Co. of New York designed yellow shoes in a basket weave pattern accented with a stylized plumeria flower ornament on the toe of each shoe.

I am obsessed with this 1971 uniform and accompanying fish necklace. Unfortunately, the company didn't start archiving uniforms until 2009, so have only one of these. I would love to get my hands on one!

I am obsessed with this 1971 uniform and accompanying fish necklace, all designed by Richard Tam. Unfortunately, the company didn't start archiving uniforms until 2009, so have only one of these. I would love to get my hands on one!

Here's the look as worn in 1971, when so much thought was put into accessories that the ensemble included custom peasant belts, head scarf and footwear, with pump, gladiator or go-go boot options, and going to work was fun and glamorous according to those working at the time.

Here are two ways the look was worn in 1971, when so much thought was put into accessories that the ensemble included custom peasant belts, head scarf and footwear, with pump, gladiator or go-go boot options, and going to work was fun and glamorous according to those working at the time.

HA_1971D_Uniform

The uniforms were refreshed or replaced every four to five years. In 1971, San Francisco designer Richard Tam, whose creations were sold at Saks Fifth Avenue and Bergdorf Goodman, was tapped to create a chic tea-time ensemble of a soft nylon knit dress with high front slit that revealed hot pants underneath. It was accessorized with a matching headscarf, a mix of low-heeled pumps, and gladiator and go-go boots, all in white, and a gold-metal fish pendant that would be called a statement necklace today. I thought it was the coolest uniform.

At left, and leading up to the present, is a uniform using Hawaiian Airlines' longest-running  print, at 11 years between 1979 and 1988.

At left, and leading up to the present, is a uniform using Hawaiian Airlines' longest-running print, at 11 years between 1979 and 1988.

In 1974, Malia International became the first local company to design the airline’s uniforms, creating glamorous long and short dresses in polyester knits. Malia created three collections for the airline, including those incorporating the long-running Sky print of hibiscus red, bright orchid and white to match Hawaiian Airlines classic wahine logo. The uniform will be familiar to those who flew between 1979 and 1988.

Then, as now, uniform selection is a matter of fashion and functionality, Nakane­lua-Richards said. When planes are changed, uniforms may have to be adjusted to take higher carry-on bins into account, which require freedom of movement and a longer skirt.

Dress is also more formal on international flights, to take other countries' fashion into account. The current uniform of a Pacific Blue aloha shirt can be dressed up with a more structured skirt, jacket and pant.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

How to 'Live (and wear) Aloha'

By
November 7th, 2014



Matt Bruening and Bliss Lau had the finale look during the "Live Aloha" runway show that was part of Honolulu Fashion Week's VIP Preview Night.

Matt Bruening and Bliss Lau had the finale look during the "Live Aloha" runway show that was part of Honolulu Fashion Week's VIP Preview Night.

With a little help from a homecoming contingent from New York, Hawaii's designers and models staged an international caliber runway show during the "Live Aloha" VIP preview for Honolulu Fashion Week at the Hawai'i Convention Center.

A team from Wilhelmina New York, including locally born and raised Roman Young and Bobby Gutierrez, cast the models, Don Sumada styled the show, and New York and Miami Fashion Week producer Lynne O'Neill whipped everyone into shape—in a nice way I'm sure!—and the result was a brisk-paced, dynamic showcase that everyone involved can be proud of.

The show and fashion managed to capture the spirit of our casual/resort lifestyle, while amping up the drama in an editorial way via bold-print separates. The audience's eyes were riveted to the looks as they were revealed, and to me, that's one measure of an ensemble's success. It should be interesting enough to take more than a casual glance to "read."

"Hawaii Five-0's" Alex O'Loughlin and Malia Jones brought the celebrity quotient to the event, gamely posing for photos, including seated in the front row in my iPhone shot.

"Hawaii Five-0's" Alex O'Loughlin and Malia Jones brought the celebrity quotient to the event, gamely posing for photos, including seated in the front row in my iPhone shot.

FW Alex2

Olympian-turned-designer Kristi Yamaguchi, left,  also attended with Danville, Calif., boutique owner Elisa Wen Tell. Pieces from Yamaguchi's Tsu.Ya sportswear line will be shown at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Hawai'i Convention Center, part of the "Get Out!" active, swim and surf wear showcase. Admission is free, but seats are limited.

Olympian-turned-designer Kristi Yamaguchi, left, also attended with Elisa Wen boutique owner Elizabeth Wen Tell. Pieces from Yamaguchi's Tsu.Ya sportswear line will be shown at 1 p.m. Saturday at the Hawai'i Convention Center, part of the "Get Out!" active, swim and surf wear showcase. Admission is free, but seats are limited.

Having attended fashion week events in New York, Shanghai and Bali, the presentation was definitely on par with those cities, and among the most professional I've seen here since the French Festival events from waaaay back, and even earlier, Chanel runway shows, when models were flown in for the occasion because Hawaii was an important, lucrative market for the brands. Over time, the budgets moved to other budding markets, such as China.

All the more reason to create our own market for homegrown talent. Special guests for the evening were the creators of Saturdays Surf NYC, but otherwise, the lengthy roster of local designers and brands included Sig Zane Designs, Ari South, Allison Izu, Matt Bruening, Roberta Oaks, Amos Kotomori, Bliss Lau, Salty Girl Jewelry, Organik, and more.

Many more designers and creatives were featured in popup shops and Art + Flea market setup featuring The Aloha Collective, M33Ms Jewelry, and more.

And then there was the celebrity factor, with Alex O'Loughlin and wife Malia Jones sitting in the front row, across from Olympic gold medalist Kristi Yamaguchi, who launched her own fashion career in fall 2012 with the debut of her Tsu.ya activewear clothing line.

Tsu.ya will be among the brands featured during the "Get Out" surf, swim, active apparel showcase taking place at 1 p.m. Nov. 8 at the Hawai'i Convention Center. Admission is free. You can read more about the line in a story I wrote at the time of the launch: http://bit.ly/1xrgQah

Hawaii's latest "Project Runway" designer Kini Zamora in front of his popup shop with his business and communications director Anuhea Diamond Patoc and fashion partner Dean "Dinko" Satta.  The KINI and DINKO Spring/Summer 2015 collection debuts at 7:30 p.m. today, during a free show at Hawai'i Convention Center.

Hawaii's latest "Project Runway" designer Kini Zamora in front of his popup shop with his business and communications director Anuhea Diamond Patoc and fashion partner Dean "Dinko" Satta. The KINI and DINKO Spring/Summer 2015 collection debuts at 7:30 p.m. today, during a free show at Hawai'i Convention Center.

Hawaii's fashion community turned out for the event, including from left, designer Matt Bruening, stylist Lindsey Higa, designer Kuha'o Zane and model Desmond Centro.

Hawaii's fashion community turned out for the event, including from left, designer Matt Bruening, stylist Lindsey Higa, designer Kuha'o Zane and model Desmond Centro.

 A red gown by Ari South was part of the "Live Aloha" show's finale.

A red gown by Ari South was part of the "Live Aloha" show's finale.

A MAMo (Maoli Arts Month) popup shop featured Native Hawaiian creations, including these beautiful feather lei, as a warmup for the MAMo Wearable Art Show taking place 7:30 p.m. Nov. 8 at the convention center.

It was definitely a selfie moment for everyone, including media, and below, Kristi Yamaguchi and Elizabeth Wen Tell.

FW KY

On video

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Fashion by the sea

By
November 6th, 2014



Chelsea Yamase wears a Lotta Stenson tunic ($190) and slip ($45) from Malie Organics. Jean-Christophe Alleon is in a Reyn Spooner shirt and M.Nii shorts from GREENROOM Hawaii, and Martin & MacArthur koa-frame sunglasses ($295).

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Chelsea Yamase wears a Lotta Stenson tunic ($190) and slip ($45) from Malie Organics. Jean-Christophe Alleon is in a Reyn Spooner shirt, M.Nii shorts from GREENROOM Hawaii, and Martin & MacArthur koa-frame sunglasses ($295).

Collections of Waikiki hosted An Oceanfront Fashion Affair on Wednesday, with two resort fashion presentations in the beachfront settings of the Royal Hawaiian, a Luxury Collection's Mai Tai Bar, and the Sheraton Waikiki's RumFire Diamond Head patio.

I was able to make it to the earlier Passion for Fashion presentation of resort and casual wear at the Royal Hawaiian, where the public was welcome to sample pupu while watching the models — including 2014 Miss Hawaii USA Moani Hara — share looks from Vivienne Westwood, REBECCA beach, Newt at The Royal, Reyn Spooner and more.

The second event, Style by the Sea, featured the latest in swimwear and casual beachwear from Sand People, San Lorenzo Brazilian Bikinis, Waikiki Beachboy, Volcom and more.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comLia Mausolf wears a Chan Luu racerback tank ($180) and Paisley skirt ($465) from REBECCA Beach in one of the cabanas near the Royal Hawaiian's Mai Tai Bar.

Lia Mausolf wears a Chan Luu racerback tank ($180) and Paisley skirt ($465) from REBECCA Beach in one of the cabanas near the Royal Hawaiian's Mai Tai Bar.

Jean-Christophe Alleon is in a Reyn Spooner "Indigo Blossoms" shirt ($98) and OluOlu slacks ($95), with Martin & MacArthur koa Monarch watch ($1,950). The case is from Rimowa and his look is topped off with a Panama hat from Newt at the Royal.

Jean-Christophe Alleon is in a Reyn Spooner "Indigo Blossoms" shirt ($98) and OluOlu pants ($95), with Martin & MacArthur koa Monarch watch ($1,950). The case is from Rimowa and his look is topped off with a Panama hat from Newt at the Royal.

From left, Lia is in a dress from Pashma, with chocolate pearl and diamond ring and earrings from Maui Divers Jewelry; and Chelsea wears a silk halter dress from REBECCA Beach with a Pashma scarf and sapphire and diamond ring and earrings from Maui Divers Jewelry.  Miss Hawaii USA 2014 Moani Hara wears Vivienne Westwood's Orbits dress with matching necklace.

From left, Lia is in a dress from Pashma, with chocolate pearl and diamond ring and earrings from Maui Divers Jewelry; and Chelsea wears a silk halter dress from REBECCA Beach with a Pashma scarf and sapphire and diamond ring and earrings from Maui Divers Jewelry. Miss Hawaii USA 2014 Moani Hara wears Vivienne Westwood's Orbits dress with matching necklace.

Japan model and TV star Angela Maki Vernon, in a dress from Vivienne Westwood, co-hosted the event with Jered Branco of Vivienne Westwood.

Japan model and TV star Angela Maki Vernon, in a dress from Vivienne Westwood, co-hosted the event with Jered Branco of Vivienne Westwood.

Lacy Matsumoto, left, with makeup artists Roque Cozzette and Kecia Littman, who provided nake-up and hair styling for the day.

Lacy Matsumoto, left, with makeup artists Roque Cozzette and Kecia Littman, who provided nake-up and hair styling for the day.

Guests enjoyed cheese, fruit, meatballs, crackers, tandoori chicken, and below, charcuterie and artichoke hearts, among other great bites.

Guests enjoyed cheese, fruit, meatballs, crackers, tandoori chicken, and below, charcuterie and artichoke hearts, among other great bites.

rhc food

Collections of Waikiki retail stores, located within the Royal Hawaiian, Sheraton Waikiki and Moana Surfrider hotels, will be offering in-store promotions and sales throughout November.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Your Dapper debuts new bow ties

By
November 5th, 2014



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKatherine Chinn and Brent Nakano founded Your Dapper in 2013 with friend and fashion enthusiast with John DeCosta, specializing in bow ties.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Katherine Chinn and Brent Nakano founded Your Dapper in 2013 with friend and fashion enthusiast with John DeCosta, specializing in bow ties.

The reason I have two Twitter accounts is because I learned after starting my @Fashiontribe account that the normal person isn't as interested in fashion as I am. Perhaps even less so is the person interested in food, which I cover on my other beat.

The foodie and the fashionista are usually two different creatures. The fashionista is a nibbler, or simply doesn't eat to maintain a paparazzi-ready figure. And any food gathering is best attended in a garment with a lot of give. Think caftan, muumuu, old-school boxy aloha shirt, or anything sans a belt or other constricting feature.

But those ahead of the game know fashion transcends all boundaries. You find it in the presentation of food, technology, home decor, entertainment and lifestyle.

Your Dapper aimed to bring lifestyle into focus during a men's presentation on Sunday as part of Hawai'i Fashion Month.

The event took place in the Aston Waikiki Beach Hotel Coconut Club on the 21st floor of the hotel, where early arrivals had a view of the sunset before enjoying food and drink created by trendsetting barmen and chefs, with the idea of setting the stage for the good life with good clothes, food and drink.

Samuel Armitage, right, wearing Your Dapper's Bluff bow tie, adjusts the Deus Ex Machina tie worn by Nicolas Carter.

Samuel Armitage, right, wearing Your Dapper's Bluff bow tie, adjusts the Deux Ex Machina tie worn by Nicolas Carter.

Among those at the table: Jamal Lahiani, culinary consultant at Your Dapper and Chef of Tropics Taphouse Group; Tim Rita Jr., beverage consultant for Your Dapper and mixologist at the Cosmopolitan in Las Vegas; Christian Self, Bevy; Dave Newman, Pint and Jigger; Robert McGee, Link; and Jeremy Shigekane, former Chef de Cuisine of Hoku's and Chai's Island Bistro.

Each chose a bow tie from Your Dapper’s Spring/Summer 2015 collection to serve as inspiration for their food or cocktail. Recipes and and descriptions of each pairing are available here.

The lifestyle-driven brand also featured food tied to the poker and bow-tie theme, including Jamal Lahiani's dish of farfalle, or bow-tie pasta,  and fish.

The lifestyle-driven brand also featured food tied to the poker and bow tie theme, including Jamal Lahiani's dish of farfalle, or bow-tie pasta, and fish.

Among the libations offered up in the spirit of the event was Bevy's Deus Ex Machina, of chartreuse, arack, absinthe, lime, lemongrass and "stuff," concocted by Christian Self.

Among the libations offered up in the spirit of the event was Bevy's Deus Ex Machina, of chartreuse, arack, absinthe, lime, lemongrass and "stuff," concocted by Christian Self.

Behind Your Dapper are Punahou grad and brand strategist Brent Nakano, designer Katherine Chinn, and Punahou grad and business director John DeCosta.

Chinn, who grew up in Burbank, fulfilled her childhood dream of being a costume designer, but longed to branch out into something she could call her own when she met Nakano, who encouraged her to pursue her passion for menswear.

She said she loves bows and bow ties for herself, but got the idea for a different kind of men's bow tie when looking at casual summer cotton and madras shirts.

"I saw a big hole in the market because bow ties are usually designed for more formal, classic looks," she said, and the structured bow ties didn't fit in with a casual spring and summer vibe.

p align="left">Your Dapper's presentation was built around a mock poker game. At left, Ikaika Johnson wears "Glass House," while Matthew Hirokane is in "Gambit."

Your Dapper's presentation was built around a mock poker game. At left, Ikaika Johnson wears Glass House, while Matthew Hirokane is in Gambit.

Akikazu Matsuno shows another way to wear Your Dapper's Juke bow tie, in the pocket of a hoodie vest.

Akikazu Matsuno shows another way to wear Your Dapper's Juke bow tie, in the pocket of a hoodie vest.

Paul Anthony Jackson in a white-on-white ensemble that includes Your Dapper's "Wet T-shirt" tie.

Paul Anthony Jackson in a white-on-white ensemble that includes Your Dapper's Wet T-shirt tie.

For spring and summer 2015, Your Dapper's Poker-themed collection features soft, unstructured cotton voile creations that are lightweight and cut in a rectangle for a loose, fluttery and yes, dapper, look. The aim is to be the best-dressed gent in the room. Every alpha understands that.

Until spring arrives, you can pick up Fall 2014 ties for holiday dressing, at $70 each, at YourDapper.com, as well as view some of the recipes from the event on the Your Dapper blog.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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