Archive for January, 2015

Anthropologie arrives

By
January 29th, 2015



PHOTOS COURTESY ANTHROPOLOGIEThis Emmeline dress will be among the petite selections available when Anthropologie opens its doors.

PHOTOS COURTESY ANTHROPOLOGIE

This Emmeline dress will be among the petite selections available when Anthropologie opens its doors.

I know so many people who have been waiting for Anthropologie to come to Hawaii, and the blessed day has arrived.

The brand known for its rustic, bohemian lifestyle approach to home and dress will open its first Hawaii boutique at 10 a.m. Sunday on Ala Moana Center's third floor, Center Court area.

The 5,000-plus square foot store incorporates original design elements and work by local artists and artisans, and pays tribute to Hawaii’s culture and architectural traditions with a lanai-inspired entry.

Each Anthropologie store is unique to its community, and this one is tailored to a beach to evening out lifestyle. The Hawaii boutique is also one of a select number of stores offering a petite (yay!) shop-in-a-shop featuring work by designers like Cecilia Prado, Cynthia Vincent, Tracy Reese and Ranna Gill.

Here are a few photos shared by Anthropologie:

Seafolly Summer Garden boy-leg maillot.

Seafolly Summer Garden boy-leg maillot.

Garden Mirror Shorts.

Garden Mirror Shorts.

Noronha Wrap Dress.

Noronha Wrap Dress.

Check back here late Saturday night when I'll be able to give you a sneak peek of what to look for on Sunday.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Guerlain harnesses flower power

By
January 28th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comWomen from the Sogetsu school of ikebana meet Guerlain's National Beauty and Fragrance Director, Marie Line Patry, center.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Women from the Sogetsu school of ikebana meet Guerlain's National Beauty and Fragrance Director, Marie Line Patry, center.

Neiman Marcus welcomed Guerlain National Beauty and Fragrance Director Marie Line Patry to the store Jan. 22, who shared the luxury skincare company's latest Orchidée Impériale and Blanc de Perle whitening products.

Guerlain Orchidée Impériale The Rich Cream.

Guerlain Orchidée Impériale The Rich Cream.

She was welcomed with a display of orchid arrangements created by women from the Sogetsu School of Ikebana, in celebration of the flower that brings its healing, hydrating and whitening properties to the Orchidée Impériale line.

Botanists and green thumbs have long known of the orchid's ability to withstand severe weather conditions. They can also appear to be dead over seasons, but under the right conditions, bloom again. Guerlain's researchers found the Gold Orchid, Dendrobium chrysotoxum, a native of Myanmar, Nepal, Northern India, Thailand and China, to be extremely resilient.

This flower provides the Imperial Orchid Molecular Extract, or I.O.M.E. that prolongs cell fertility, and is at the heart of Orchidée Impériale skincare.

The event also marked the Hawaii launch of Blanc de Perle, available for the first time in the United States, after being used in Europe for a decade. This line targets dark spot-creating melanin to deliver a brightening effect on skin.

Guerlain Blanc de Perle Drop Essence.

Guerlain Blanc de Perle Drop Essence.

Priscilla Growney's ikebana arrangement.

Priscilla Growney's ikebana arrangement.

Joyce Tomonari with her ikebana arrangement, also shown below.

Joyce Tomonari with her ikebana arrangement, incorporating a gold-painted bowl fashioned from pine needles, also shown below.

guerlain gold

Linda Hamasaki with her arrangement, shown in more detail below.

Linda Hamasaki with her arrangement, shown in more detail below.

orchid hamasaki

After listening to Patry's talk, women were welcome to try the products, and one of the women who spent more than $1,000 reasoned, "If you go to a spa once, it's going to cost you $300. I can use the cream every day.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Duo lauds conscious consumption

By
January 22nd, 2015



PHOTOS BY KRYSTLE MARCELLUS  / kmarcelluskam@staradvertiser.comConscious Designers Hawaii co-founders Camille Mori, left, and Olivia Wong, hosted a popup shop of vintage clothing and Tsubaki Himé upcycled clothing Jan. 18 at  Hawaii Fashion Incubator (HIFI), Ward Warehouse.

PHOTOS BY KRYSTLE MARCELLUS / kmarcelluskam@staradvertiser.com

Conscious Designers Hawaii co-founders Camille Mori, left, and Olivia Wong, hosted a popup shop of vintage clothing and Tsubaki Himé upcycled clothing Jan. 18 at Hawaii Fashion Incubator (HIFI), Ward Warehouse.

How far we have come from the Greatest Generation, our grandparents and great-grandparents who grew up with nothing and learned to conserve, saving everything from scraps of aluminum paper to old Christmas wrap, newspaper and rubber bands with the notion they may come in handy at some point.

I grew up in Waipahu, once home to sugar plantations, where the plantation mentality of thrift thrived, so I have always been super-conscious about limiting waste, recycling, upcycling and leaving a small footprint on the planet.

So it's ironic that I write about fashion, which I love, though I'm no fan of its vicious cycle of use and waste. It really shouldn't be this way. Yes, I talk about fashion and the trends as a matter of news, but it is not my intention to sell anyone on these new ideas. I just describe what's out there, and maybe it fits into your lifestyle or not, but no one needs to buy into every trend.

Author Elizabeth Cline wrote eloquently on the subject in 2013 with the release of her book, “Over-Dressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion.” She noted: “Well into the twentieth century, clothes were pricey and precious enough that they were mended and cared for and reimagined countless times, and most people had a few outfits that they wore until they wore them out. How things have changed. We’ve gone from making good use of the clothes we own to buying things we’ll never or barely wear. We are caught in a cycle of consumption and waste that is unsettling at best and unsatisfying at its core.”

Keilahri Anioroso models a vintage top and kimono jacket ($20) during a popup shop hosted by Conscious Designers Hawaii with jewelry by socially conscious company Love Me Knots. Shopping vintage and upcycled keeps waste at bay. The jewelry pieces are a Mermaid Me body chain with sapphire ($185), Shipwreck drop necklace ($84), Sun Kiss hand chain with beads ($65), Shipwreck bracelet ($40), and Tantalus hand chain ($144).

Keilahri Anioroso models a vintage top and kimono jacket ($20) during a popup shop hosted by Conscious Designers Hawaii with jewelry by socially conscious company Love Me Knots. Shopping vintage and upcycled keeps waste at bay. The jewelry pieces are a Mermaid Me body chain with sapphire ($185), Shipwreck drop necklace ($84), Sun Kiss hand chain with beads ($65), Shipwreck bracelet ($40), and Tantalus hand chain ($144).

This video from Adam Curtis' series "Century of the Self" is long but worth watching, discussing everything from the start of the war on drugs, to the birth of public relations, and the use of Sigmund Freud's theories to create a nation of consumers, beginning in the mid-20th century. Essentially, it tells us we've all been brainwashed.

Although I dislike the idea of fast fashion, I'm not immune to the charms of accessible price points. In limited quantity, I consider H&M and Forever21 my friends, but when you're on a steady diet of gorging and purging fast fashion, then the whole planet is in trouble. I have done the thing where I've picked up five pieces at once because they were so cheap, then gone home and hated them. I didn't like the flimsiness and I didn't feel good wearing them. A double whammy wasting money and natural resources.

There are people who scoff at the high price of designer fashion but I consider it to be less wasteful. When you spend more money, more consideration and thought goes into your decision. You end up with fewer, but higher quality pieces that you keep and wear longer.

I wonder how many people think of the implications of consumerism when they're on their shopping sprees?

But discarding items is just one level of environmental waste. About two years ago Greenpeace released its report, “Toxic Threads: The Big Fashion Stitch-Up,” detailing environmental degradation caused by toxic chemicals used in the production of clothing.

After its release, companies like Zara, H&M, and Levi Strauss & Co. committed to zero discharge of hazardous chemicals throughout its entire supply chain and products by 2020.

There is also a Slow Fashion Movement that is growing, advocated by such groups as the Centre for Sustainable Fashion and Ethical Fashion Forum, aims to support sustainable social and environmental practices within the fashion industry.

Conscious Designers Hawaii is aiming to the same for Hawaii, founded by Tsubaki Himé eco-clothing designer Camille Mori and marketing professional Olivia Wong. My story about them appears in print today.

Love Me Knots Jewelry's Sophia Vuong, back, and Jaclyn Park layer their jewelry on Courtney Gray, who is having her makeup done by June Jones.  The jewelry pieces: Triton bar necklace ($60), Tantalus quartz necklace ($60) and Deep Waters drop necklace ($118).

Love Me Knots Jewelry's Sophia Vuong, back, and Jaclyn Park layer their jewelry on Courtney Gray, who is having her makeup done by June Jones. The jewelry pieces: Triton bar necklace ($60), Tantalus quartz necklace ($60) and Deep Waters drop necklace ($118).

Mori, a student of religion and Buddhism said, “I was reading a lot of books pertaining to sustainability and shocked by the amount of waste generated by the fashion industry, and how people don’t talk about it. They talk about waste in food and other industries, but not fashion.

“When I was younger I never really thought about these things, so it was kind of a wake-up call. I thought of how much people buy and get rid of the next season. We want to promote the idea of making things last, mending, repurposing or donating them.

“A lot of it had to do with my education. When you study Buddhism, you’re taught not to be attached to objects, to think about your actions and the consequences of your actions.”

Wong said it helps to buy local when you can and seek out companies involved in socially conscious endeavors, such as Love Me Knots, a jewelry company featuring the work of Sophia Vuong and Jaclyn Park, that pursues its own socially minded work, including donating a portion of sales to human and animal welfare causes, including 20 percent of sales to such establishments as the ASPCA and Hawaiian Humane Society.

Conscious Designers Hawaii aims to host popup shops to raise funds for such causes as Dress a Girl Around the World, and encourage more designers to create sustainable brands in Hawaii.

Keep up with Conscious Designers Hawaii on Facebook. Love Me Knots jewelry is available online at http://lovemeknotshi.com

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Cho is funny, fashionable

By
January 20th, 2015



PHOTOS COURTESY BETABRANDComedian Margaret Cho about to expand fashion footprint with Solitaire.

PHOTOS COURTESY BETABRAND

Comedian Margaret Cho about to expand fashion footprint with Solitaire.

She's played an "All American Girl," Kim Jong-Il and Kim Jong-Un, and one of my favorite fashion personalities Lynne O'Neill, on "Sex and the City," but few know of Margaret Cho's other role as fashion designer.

Cho invites you to kick your purse to the curb and make your way through life with hands-free abandon.

Cho invites you to kick your purse to the curb and make your way through life with hands-free abandon.

After taking up bellydancing, Cho started her own line of Hip Wear bellydance belts and accessories in 2006. Now she's teamed up with Betabrand to create the Solitaire, a multi-pocket jumpsuit that allows you to move freely about the world sans purse, handbag or clutch.

Betabrand is a San Francisco-based online clothing company that designs, manufactures and crowdfunds innovative or quirky threads into existence with a little guidance from online followers who are able to offer critiques before the projects go into production.

Some of the company's hits include Dress Pant Yoga Pants, Executive Hoodies, Space Jackets and Gay Jeans that wear down to reveal rainbow-colored threads.

In her Betabrand introductory bio, the comedian said, "I created The Solitaire because I wanted the perfect outfit. I wanted something that could carry all my essentials: my credit card, cash, ID, lipstick, keys, and smartphone.

“I want to walk the earth freely without a handbag or anything else to hold me back from my journey, my destiny."

Her styling advice: "You can dress it up, with heels and jewelry, or you can get really sporty with it via combat boots and a matte lipstick. Anyway you dress it, you look amazing. All your stuff sits neatly in the zippered pockets. You can take on the world with both hands."

Perfect for everything from running errands to date night.

Perfect for everything from running errands to date night.

Invisible, zipped chest pocket.

Invisible, zipped chest pocket.

Every girl-on-the-go I know loves pockets. The Solitaire also has slanted side pockets, zippered cargo pockets and in-seam back pockets.

Every girl-on-the-go I know loves pockets. The Solitaire also has slanted side pockets, zippered cargo pockets and in-seam back pockets.

As of this writing, the Solitaire is a Think Tank item in need of crowdfunding and offered at $159.80. There are only eight left to be purchased within 14 days.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

1+1+1 a winning formula

By
January 16th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comFrom left, Hawai'i Tourism Japan's Mitsue Varley with Sascha Koki, in a Diamond Headdolphin T-shirt, and Clarence Lee Design president and art director Kuni Yamamoto.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

From left, Hawai'i Tourism Japan's Mitsue Varley with Sascha Koki, in a Diamond Headdolphin T-shirt, and Clarence Lee Design president and art director Kuni Yamamoto.

Companies pay thousands of dollars for branding, marketing and creative help. It's one of the reasons the giants can wrangle a majority of the marketplace, leaving small businesses scrambling for scraps.

Something is wrong with this picture, and over at Clarence Lee Design, president and art director Kuni Yama­moto knew it. A member of Seiwajyuku — an international group of business owners, who follow the philosophy of Kyocera Corp. founder Kazuo Inamori in striving to do the right thing for people and the environment in their business practices — he was empowered to think his company could make a difference.

As a result of his desire to create a “win-win-win” situation, the 111-Hawaii Project was born, a collaboration between Clarence Lee Design and Hawai‘i Tourism Japan. 111-Hawaii stands for “1 Hand, 1 Home, 1 Heart” and had its launch Sunday at Aka­kura House, a footwear and made-in-Hawaii product boutique in Wai­kiki that now houses a small showroom for 111-Hawaii Project products. The products will be created by local businesses with a branding, packaging and marketing aboost from Clarence Lee Design specialists and their partners in media, public relations and retail.

Clarence Lee Vice President Laron Miya­shiro explained, “In our business we have a lot of big clients, but we also have a lot of small-business clients who are just starting out. A lot of them have good made-in-Hawaii products, but they don’t get the attention they need to grow and succeed. The thinking behind the project is that, as a design company, we could donate our services to help them with their branding and design.”

It is quite a gift for small businesses, and those interested in becoming a part of the project may apply online.

Naomi Matsuo was serving Ueshima Coffee, or UCC Hawaii Corp.'s Ice Coffee, the first product launch from the 111-Hawaii Project.

New packaging by Clarence Lee Design was designed to help the UCC Coffee stand apart from the competition.

Keiki show the Diamond Headdog and Diamond Headolphin designs that will mark all 111-Hawaii Project products.

A portion of proceeds from Project sales will benefit nonprofits focused on environment, culture and the arts. Beneficiaries will change annually. This year it’s Na Kama Kai (“Children of the Sea”), a nonprofit supporting ocean safety and conservation programs.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Estée Lauder offers gift at NM

By
January 15th, 2015



PHOTO COURTESY ESTEE LAUDER

COURTESY ESTEE LAUDER

Just ahead of the new spring beauty season, Neiman Marcus is hosting an Up Close: Estée Lauder event during store hours through Jan. 25 to introduce the brand’s new color and skin care products, in Cosmetics, Level One.

Those spending $75 or more in Estée Lauder items will receive a Lisa Perry-designed tote with deluxe samples of Advanced Night Repair Synchronized Recovery Complex II, ReNutriv Ultimate Lift Age Correcting Creme, Sumptuous Extreme Bold Volume Lifting Mascara and AERIN Lilac Path fragrance sample, plus a full-size lipstick and eyeshadow palette in your choice of subtle or bold colors, at one gift per person, while supplies last.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Sweet treats from Sephora

By
January 13th, 2015



PHOTOS COURTESY SEPHORAMaison du Chocolat for Sephora Collection's Valentine's Day gift box.

PHOTOS COURTESY SEPHORA

Maison du Chocolat for Sephora Collection's Valentine's Day gift box.

You survived Christmas, but don’t think you’re off the hook for gift giving. Valentine’s Day is around the corner and Sephora is making shopping easier with a limited-edition, decadent beauty gift set created in collaboration with La Maison du Chocolate.

The La Maison du Chocolate for Sephora Collection features four signature pralines from the luxury chocolatier, paired with a lightweight matte lip color from Sephora Collection, all packaged in an elegant red box for $20. Sweet!

Sephora open

Sephora Collection's Luster Matte long-lasting lip color in "Mulberry."

Maison du Chocolat's Grain Dentelle, milk chocolate praliné with slivers of crispy waffle.

Maison du Chocolate's Grain Dentelle, milk chocolate praliné with slivers of crispy waffle.

Sephora has three stores on Oahu — Pearlridge, Ala Moana and Waikiki. Visit sephora.com for more.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

January designated 'Month of me'

By
January 7th, 2015



CHANEL PHOTO

CHANEL PHOTO

I guess some people don't know the "One for me, one for you" Christmas shopping philosophy of treating yourself even as you search arduously for others' gifts.

For them, January is reward time, and digital offers destination RetailMeNot is calling January the "Month of Me." After interviewing consumers for its post-Christmas trend report, they found that many consumers intend to spend nearly $160 on themselves this month.

Other findings:

>> 79 percent of U.S. consumers surveyed plan to spend the same or more on themselves in 2015 than they did last year.

>> A higher percentage of men (24 percent) vs. women (18 percent) report they will spend more on themselves in 2015.

>> As for how they will pay for their spending, 45 percent said they expect to be making more money in 2015 (50 percent of men vs. 39 percent of women). About a third (35 percent) said their ability to spend more on themselves is based on their smart shopping skills, allowing them stretch their dollars further. And 29 percent of consumers surveyed said lowering other expenses in 2015 will give them more to spend on themselves.

I've been pricing some of the classic Chanel handbags, which never seem to lose their value. Then I saw the cute Chanel pearl minaudiere online, which always confuses matters.

The question is, what will you be picking up for yourself?

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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