Archive for April, 2015

HCC stages jubilant ‘Juxtapose’

By
April 28th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKyle Woolsey posed with his models, including Ari South, far right, after his finale show during "Juxtapose—Central Park After Dark," the Honolulu Community College senior fashion show.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Kyle Woolsey posed with his models, including Ari South, far right, after his finale show during "Juxtapose—Central Park After Dark," the Honolulu Community College senior fashion show.

Ten designers from Honolulu Community College's Fashion Technology program presented their senior collections during the school's annual fashion show on Saturday.

“Juxtapose—Central Park After Dark" saw the school's Building 5 Courtyard transformed into a New York cityscape with a backdrop of skyscrapers, trees and small bridge on the runway.

The fashion show also serves as a project for the school's many educational departments. The stage and New York skyline backdrop were the work of the HCC Art, Design Center and Carpentry departments. The cosmetology department created hair and makeup looks.

The fashion show also serves as a project for the school's many educational departments. The stage and New York skyline backdrop were the work of the HCC Art, Design Center and Carpentry departments. The cosmetology department created hair and makeup looks.

I spotted one of the school's illustrious alums, Kini Zamora, in the crowd, but where was his fellow "Project Runway" designer Ari South?

Well, what a surprise when — just when we thought the last model had appeared in the finale show — Ari turned up on the runway in a red ballgown created by Kyle Woolsey, for whom South had served as a mentor.

I still remember seeing Ari (when she was still known as Andy South) during a friendly post-fashion show walk-off at Kahala Mall. Andy in stilettos put the girls to shame, and at that time none of us knew of the changes in store.

To see Ari in full blossom was a spectacular moment that will be remembered for years to come.

Ari South, right, with Pono Fernandez, after the show in evening gowns by Kyle Woolsey.

Ari South, right, with Pono Fernandez, after the show in evening gowns by Kyle Woolsey.

Designer Kini Zamora with Kaliko Fukumoto and one of his mentors, retired HCC instructor Lillian Zane.

Designer Kini Zamora with Kaliko Fukumoto and one of his mentors, retired HCC instructor Lillian Zane.

The event advertises "heavy pupu," but guests over the past few years have been treated instead to a full dinner buffet. This year's event, catered by JHTW Foods, embraced the theme, serving such dishes as New York steak with Big Apple demi, and pictured, pastrami-crusted mahi with mustard cream sauce. One diner said the meal alone was worth the $35 ticket price.

The event advertises "heavy pupu," but guests over the past few years have been treated instead to a full dinner buffet. This year's event, catered by JHTW Foods, embraced the theme, serving such dishes as New York steak with Big Apple demi, and pictured, pastrami-crusted mahi with mustard cream sauce. One diner said the meal alone was worth the $35 ticket price.

Designer Alexander Propios with his model Leilani Ramos. I was impressed that he designed this print and had the fabric made, as well as the placement of graphic elements on his garments. It was a puzzle that is way beyond my non-mathematical, non-mechanical way of thinking.

Designer Alexander Propios with his model Leilani Ramos. I was impressed that he designed this print and had the fabric made, as well as the placement of graphic elements on his garments. It was a puzzle that is way beyond my non-mathematical, non-mechanical way of thinking.

The designers take their bows on stage at the end of the show. From left, Irene Cramer, Shailanne Ah Loo, Joliber Albano, Cherrie Lyn Beltran and Charae Laleo.

The designers take their bows on stage at the end of the show. From left, Irene Cramer, Shailanne Ah Loo, Joliber Albano, Cherrie Lyn Beltran and Charae Laleo.

Students take their bows after the show. From left, Kyle Woolsey, Alexander Propios, Savanna Rains-Cole, Veronica Hendrickson and Karen Dulatre.

Students take their bows after the show. From left, Kyle Woolsey, Alexander Propios, Savanna Rains-Cole, Veronica Hendrickson and Karen Dulatre.

In the spirit of the evening, instructor and mentor Joy Nagaue carried a purse with a New York skyline to match the fashion show's backdrop.

In the spirit of the evening, instructor and mentor Joy Nagaue carried a purse with a New York skyline to match the fashion show's backdrop.

Here are the collections:

CHIOLOGY BY SHAILANNE AH LOO

The idea of balance, in life, work and enjoyment of outdoors, appeals to Shailanne Ah Loo, whose meditations brought her to Chiology, based on the Chinse belief in chi, a life force energy that flows through all living things.

Ah Loo attempted to capture the free flow of wind, the abundance of nature’s colors in a collection that is playful and full of life, and adjustable to suit an individual’s needs and whims.

WATERMARK BY JOLIBER ALBANO

In the fashion world, there are designers who love structure, and those who love flow, and the two styles rarely merge. Joliber Albano is the rare designer capable of marrying the two aesthetics, to womens’ best advantage.

“I like to accentuate a woman’s body. My styles have features that create the illusion of a slim waist, pleats to add volume to a small bust, or to make it look like you have a perfect hourglass figure.”

Her philosophy grew out of her own problems finding suitable clothing for her petite frame.

“I have a small bust and found clothes that just accentuated what I don’t have, or dresses with back plunges that couldn’t be worn easily without a bra.”

Now, if she does create a plunging back, she builds in a bra, and even a simple sundress has figure-shaping princess seams.

CHERRIE AMOR BY CHERRIE LYN BELTRAN

Perhaps second time’s the charm for Cherrie Lyn Beltran, who joined the HCC fashion program in 2003, but left to raise her daughter Haleina. Beltran’s earlier focus was on women’s fashion, but her daughter has inspired a line of girls clothing that allows them to look like girls, not pint-sized strumpets.

“My daughter’s at that age, between 8 and 12, when she’s past the cutesy tutu dress age, but not a teenager. What I notice when I’m shopping is that a lot of clothing for girls her age show a lot of skin. I know I’m not the only parent who doesn’t like that.”

While she’s still able to control what Haleina wears, she’s creating girlwear that keeps her daughter covered. “No midriffs and risqué clothing.”

In the process, she’s created some clever convertible pieces and separates, and a signature motif of triangles. And Haleina seemed pleased to walk the show's finale with her mom.

MEDITERRANEAN DREAMS BY IRENE CRAMER

Irene Cramer already had a career as a speech/language pathologist, but after caring for her mom after she became sick from cancer, Cramer adopted the philosophy that life is too short to not pursue your dreams.

“I needed to be doing what I really love to do, and that is designing clothes. I wanted to see what I could do and challenge myself.”

As an avid surfer, paddler and former collegiate swimmer, the ocean has always played a big part in her life, and now, her senior collection, created in soft, ocean-blue colored and eco-conscious bamboo fabric.

“It’s made to travel well; it doesn’t wrinkle.”

Her dresses and separates are made with island-style day-to-night transition pieces created from lightweight white eyelet to look like bubbles on ocean crests.

THE MINIMALIST BY KAREN DULATRE

Karen Dulatre is a daydreamer and people watcher who enjoys observing people and making up stories about their lives, based on what they’re wearing.

“I woud imagine them going out to dinner, or going to a tea party,” she said, and that has translated into her own collection of basic pieces that can be dressed up or down to suit any occasion “so they can be at-school casual, more flirty for parties or add a little more for evenings, a nice jacket or heels.”

Considered the “shy quiet girl” while growing up, Dulatre said, “Fashion is the one outlet where I’m slowly not afraid of showing people who I am,” and her aim is to help others express themselves through clothing choices.

A-MAIZ-ING BY VERONICA HENDRICKSON

Veronica Hendrickson takes inspiration from her Mexican heritage in creating her collection of wedding gowns and bridesmaide dresses from manta, a traditional Mexican cotton fabric that she imported from her home country, accented with a maize, or corn, print.

“Corn represented more than food to the Aztecs and Mayans. It was seen as something spiritual and life-giving.”

Although she owned a special occasion custom clothing shop while living in San Diego from 2002 to 2012, her HCC experience marks her first time sharing her own beliefs and handiwork.

“When I came here, I didn’t speak English. I have three kids and want to finish my education and show them that anything is possible.”

FOREVER LACE BY CHARAE LELEO

Charae Leleo grew up surrounded by plus-size women, and knowing their struggle to find clothing that allows them to look good and feel sexy and confident.

“We all know that bigger clothing just isn’t cute,” she said, and set out to do something about it. “I want to make things that fit them and make it easer for them to shop.

“Plus size doesn’t seem as important because the fashion shows always feature skinny models, but they want to look super cute too.”

STREET BANGERZ BY ALEXANDER PROPIOS

Two generations are represented in Alexander Propios “Street Bangerz” collection, an ode to his father’s artistry as much as his own creativity, with dramatic results.

“My father and grandfather were both artists, so I grew up surrounded by design,” said Propios, who discovered a passion for fabric design after taking a course in textiles last year. Fast forward to the present, he was able to create his own graphics on Kindle, which he had digitally printed on fabric in Los Angeles and turned into a visually stunning line of sports and casual wear separates.

Propios lost his father, who died at age 50, six years ago, leaving him with his sketchbooks. Propios incorporated some of his father’s nude illustrations into his own design, saying his father would be proud to see his work given such public display.

“He worked as a truck driver, but at home was always drawing in front of me. He did screenprints too, but it was all a hobby. He never took it outside the house.”

FREE RAIN BY SAVANNA RAINS-COLE

Savanna Rains-Cole grew up wanting to be an artist, and now expresses herself through her retro, carefree designs created to suit the modern vintage girl.

“I love taking something old and bringing it to life again,” she said of breezy minis that appeal to those with a nostalgia for past decades, “when it looked like people had more fun.”

With her artists’ eye, Rains-Cole is drawn to bright color and prints that fuel her collection.

“I just want to create things that people will look at and be inspired by.”

FROM ME, TO YOU BY KYLE WOOLSEY

Kyle Woolsey was raised to be a master of the universe, studying taekwondo, writing essays and dreaming about becoming a lawyer. Even with a knack for writing, he didn’t feel it was enough of a creative outlet.

Then, during his senior year at the Myron B. Thompson Academy, he decided to create a mini fashion show for his final project, and became hooked on the process of draping and constructing gowns, which he learned over the course of completing his project, with the help of mentor Ari South.

Woolsey presented a collection of dramatic and extravagant ballgowns worthy of any female master of the universe.

Raised by a single mom, he said, “I love women and how resilient they are. I want to help elevate them, and help them to feel good confident and strong.”

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Jones launches swim line

By
April 23rd, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comSurfter/model Malia Jones is no newcomer to the world of swimwear design, having contributed and consulted with fashion brands since she was a teen-ager, but now she's gone solo, launching her inaugural Malia Jones spring/summer 2015 collection.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Surfter/model Malia Jones is no newcomer to the world of swimwear design, having contributed and consulted with fashion brands since she was a teenager, but now she's gone solo, launching her inaugural Malia Jones spring/summer 2015 collection.

True to her Kailua and North Shore roots, surfer-turned model-turned designer Malia Jones, aka Mrs. Alex O'Loughlin, remains grounded, even after a lifetime spent courted by surf and fashion brands, and jetting around the globe.

PHOTOS COURTESY MALIA JONES

PHOTOS COURTESY MALIA JONES

I caught up with Jones earlier this month at the Rebecca Beach boutique at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel, one of the local shops carrying her inaugural Malia Jones spring/summer 2015 collection, which brings together all her ideas of what swimwear should be, after having spent a career modeling “every swimsuit ever,” she said.

“I’ve worn it all. I’ve been ambassador to swimsuit companies and I’ve had my own collection within other swimsuit companies and been a consultant on other brands.”

Stepping out on her own takes much more effort.

“I get more picky when it’s my stuff because it has my name on it, so I’ve gotta love it,” she said. “I make everything myself, from sourcing materials, to the fit, to trying it on, adjusting the fit, finding the right factory to make it, getting the material there. It’s so much easier when you’re doing it for someone else, but it’s so much more interesting when you’re doing it yourself.

“The hardest thing is streamlining because there’s all these things you want to do but you have to make it true to the brand, and you have to make it timeless, because it’s for that timeless, classic woman who’s just chic.

“I think it’s all about changing, evolving, keeping what works and throwing out what doesn’t work. I think it’s a good thing in my personal life, and a great thing for all women.”

Malia Jones adjusts a suit on Meleana Estes. I love the lattice lace detailing on the top she was wearing, also her own design. Unfortunately, because of the details, including leather neckline trim, she said it is rather "pricey" and will only be available online once her website is complete.

Malia Jones adjusts a suit on Meleana Estes. I love the lattice lace detailing on the top she was wearing, also her own design. Unfortunately, because of the details, including leather neckline trim, she said it is rather "pricey" and will only be available online once her website is complete.

Jyoti Mau wears a bandeau bikini top ($110) and bottom ($110), under a white caftan coverup ($395).

Jyoti Mau wears a bandeau bikini top ($110) and bottom ($110), under a white caftan coverup ($395).

In spite of all the work she puts into her line, she doesn't let her design duties distract from her marriage to “Hawaii Five-0” star Alex O’Loughlin.

“He’s so supportive. When I have to go to L.A. to manufacture, he’s with the kids,” she said. “I try on the different pieces for him and he tells me which ones he likes. For the most part, he likes them all.

“I have a really good boundary between work and being a mom and a wife. I do need my creative space and when I’m in it I’m in it. But at the same time, I need my beach time, I need my surf time, I need my mommy time, I need my yoga time. I need time to chill out with my family and not think about what’s happening elsewhere.”

The Malia Jones collection can be found at The Modern Honolulu gift shop; Rebecca Beach at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel; Bubbles and DJ Number 808 at 66-165 Kamehameha Highway, Haleiwa; Seaside Luxe at Hualalai Resort on Hawaii Island; Cabana at Four Seasons Resort Maui; and www.maliajones.com

Read my full interview in Thursday's Honolulu Star-Advertiser.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Earth month upcycling inspiration

By
April 23rd, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comLove at Dawn designer Angela Tomiye, front left, and CHIEF designer Lynn Dagan, front right, posed with their models after their debut fashion show at Honolulu Night Market.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Love at Dawn designer Angela Tomiye, front left, and CHIEF designer Lynn Dagan, front right, posed with their models after their debut fashion show at Honolulu Night Market.

Timed ahead of Earth Day, CHIEF designer Lynn Dagan and Love at Dawn designer Angela Tomiye teamed up to stage their first fashion show at Honolulu Night Market on Saturday, as well as a trunk show of one-of-a-kind vintage and upcycled pieces.

The show served as a reminder that rather than be wasteful, the clever dresser can do his/her part to conserve resources by rescuing pieces.

Both designers share a love of vintage design and textiles, and could never bear the thought of others discarding them at the expense of the planet, as well as the closets of current and future fashion lovers and collectors. They enjoy giving the garments and textiles new life by repurposing them into more contemporary clothing and accessories.

Dagan said she'd been repurposing garments since she was in the 9th grade, followinge the example set by her mother and grandmother.

Growing up in a Filipino household, she was the dutiful daughter who studied to become an ER nurse to please her mom, and she said she loves her job, but when she goes home to sew, "This is therapy to me."

She learned to sew by watching YouTube videos, and much of her work now centers on embellishing denim shorts, and creating clutches, wallets, totes, purses and unisex crossbody bags out of unique fabrics and leather.

One of her fans, Charyse Iseri, introduced her to Angela, and Dagan said, "Angela and I really get each other. We seem to have that eye that recognizes vintage or vintage appeal. When I shop in thrift stores and come across textiles that catch my eye, I am already thinking about how I am going to design the piece."

Angela Tomiye, left, and Lynn Dagan, right, with their intern Kiki Krog.

Angela Komiye, left, and Lynn Dagan, right, with their intern Kiki Krog.

Among the models was Miss Hawaii USA Emma Wo. She will be competing in the Miss USA 2015 pageant on July 12 in Baton Rouge, La.

Among the models was Miss Hawaii USA Emma Wo. She will be competing in the Miss USA 2015 pageant on July 12 in Baton Rouge, La.

More pieces courtesy of the designers:

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CHIEF designs are currently available at Mori Hawaii by Art & Flea in Ward Warehouse, as well as The Butik at 1067 Kapiolani Boulevard, and Kira Hawaii at Pearlridge Uptown. Tomiye has a studio at Mccully and King sts., above the old Chop Sui House, where she meets with clients by appointment.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Ala Moana announces additions

By
April 15th, 2015



I'm excited to see the rundown of new shops and restaurants coming to Ala Moana Center when the Ewa Wing is completed — tentatively late this year, just in time for Christmas.

PHOTO BY TED BAKER / nkam@staradvertiser.comTed Baker London is among the retailers coming to Ala Moana Center's Ewa Wing.

COURTESY TED BAKER

Ted Baker London is among the retailers coming to Ala Moana Center's Ewa Wing.

Construction is moving quickly, and I noticed Wednesday morning that they have torn down my favorite access point on Ala Moana Boulevard: the ramp heading toward Longhi's and Morton's. If you're heading down there, plan accordingly.

The expanded three-level shopping area will eventually feature 650,000 square feet of new retail space, including a 167,000 square-foot Bloomingdale’s store. Nordstrom will also move into the Ewa Wing in March 2016.

Here's a list of what's coming; some of the brands are already represented elsewhere in town. I'm particularly excited to see newcomer Ted Baker London. Love the brand's retro, ladylike-with-an-edge style.

» Aqua Blu: Offers high-end versatile bags perfect for jetsetters on the go. Each bag is designed to be practical, fashionable, light and functional.

» The Art of Shaving: Presents a collection of grooming essentials, including shaving sets, razors, shaving brushes, and shaving products made with quality ingredients and 100 percent pure essential oils to help men achieve healthier, smoother skin.

» BOSS Hugo Boss: Line of sophisticated clothing for men and women, ranging from tuxedos and evening gowns, to club wear and casual styles.

» Calypso St. Barth: The boutique captures the romance of travel and a languid luxurious lifestyle, with the leisure looks of dip-dyed caftans, cashmere cardigans and other luxe bohemian delights.

» David Yurman: The brand is known for fine jewelry and luxury timepieces capturing the essence of relaxed American luxury.

» The D Shop – Desigual: The Barcelona-based brand is characterized by its distinctive, colorful prints and casual designs for women, men and kids.

» Gloria Jean’s Coffees: Single origin and flavored beans, and the latest in coffee accessories will create a modern, elevated coffee and food experience.

» Laline: “Body meets soul” with this bath and body care line. Laline combines the best of nature and science, sourcing essential oils and scents from Provence, and mineral salts from the Dead Sea to help improve skin.

» Pierre Marcolini: The chocolatier makes his own couverture chocolate using cacao beans sourced from Mexico, Madagascar, Venezuela and more exotic locales, resulting in luxury craft chocolates and sweets.

» Ted Baker London: The menswear and womenswear brand is loved for its quality and distinctive use of design and colour, plus attention to detail. Traditional and contemporary influences with a dose of irreverent sense of humour capture a quintessential British attitude.

» Tempura Ichidai: The second offering from Pierthirty USA, Inc., will feature a fresh tempura bar allowing patrons to choose from a variety of tempura items.

» Longines: Known for its rich heritage and winged hourglass logo, Longines brings its 180 years of watchmaking expertise to elegant, high-performance timepieces.

» Moncler: Travelers swear by Moncler’s stylish, technologically advanced apparel and outerwear providing warmth and go anywhere lightness.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Your Cargo snap could win

By
April 15th, 2015



PHOTO BY CARGOCargo's "Summer in the City" eye palette.

COURTESY CARGO

Cargo's "Summer in the City" eye palette.

To reinforce the idea of Cargo Cosmetics as a makeup brand that fits all your needs on the go, the company has launched a social media photo contest to discover where you wear Cargo.

To enter, snap a photo of your favorite Cargo product in your city or on a trip. Tag @cargocosmetics and use the contest hashtag #MYCITYMYCARGO in your post. Midnight EST April 26 is the deadline, and five winners with the most creative photos will win a Cargo Summer in the City eye palette.

Winners will be announced April 27.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Healthier feminine hygiene

By
April 9th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comTomomi Hasegawa introduced women in Japan to feminine hygiene pads of organic cotton, and recently launched her line at Green Spa Hawaii.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Tomomi Hasegawa introduced women in Japan to feminine hygiene pads of organic cotton, and recently launched her line at Green Spa Hawaii.

This may be a yucky subject for some, but will be of interest to those who care about their health.

Disposable menstrual pads are believed to have had roots on American battlefields, when medics figured the same bandages used to cover soldiers' wounds could be repurposed to stanch women's monthly flow. According to Wikipidea, the first commercially available American disposable napkins were Lister's Towels created by Johnson & Johnson in 1896.

With that long history, few question the wisdom of reaching for those handy disposables. The alternative—washing reusable cloth—is almost unthinkable, both in terms of time and ick factor.

After becoming aware of the health hazards associated with disposable pads and tampons, Tomomi Hasegawa, a beauty specialist in Japan, decided her health was more important than any inconvenience that comes with reusable products.

A typical commercial pad contains the equivalent of about four plastic bags and plasticizing chemicals like BPA and BPS that disrupt embryonic development, that are also linked to heart disease and cancer. On the other side of that argument, the FDA has also performed its own research and reviewed hundreds of studies about BPA’s safety, and while acknowledging additional research is underway to enhance understanding of BPA, the FDA continues to support the safety of BPA for currently approved uses in food containers and packaging. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention also reports that typical consumer exposure to BPA is 1,000 times below the safe limit established by government scientists.

But tampons and pads are also bleached to achieve the clean white look we prize. Chlorine is often used, but chlorine breaks down into dioxin, a deadly toxin. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, there is no safe level of exposure for dioxin. It accumulate in fatty tissues, and even at low levels have been linked to abnormal tissue growth in the abdomen and reproductive organs, abnormal cell growth, immune system suppression and hormonal and endocrine system disruption. Because mucous membranes in the vaginal area are permeable, chemicals are easily absorbed.

Going organic means washing and looking at the blood, but Hasegawa says that's a beautiful thing. Through an interpreter, she said, "It's looking at yourself."

Hasegawa spoke to a gathering of women that included many new moms who have taken an interest in healthful, organic products for home and body due to concern over the health of their children.

Hasegawa spoke to a gathering of women that included many new moms who have taken an interest in healthful, organic products for home and body due to concern over the health of their children.

Hasegawa made the decision to adopt a natural, more healthful and green approach to deal with menstrual blood, and has since created Lumiere, a line of organic cotton feminine hygiene products. She does not offer or recommend tampons, which carry the risk of toxic shock syndrome.

She was in Hawaii last month to introduce the concept at Green Spa Hawaii, where a starter $44 kit comes with a napkin holder and two liners.

While the price point may seem higher than what women pay for disposable products, these products can be reused multiple times and represent an investment in your long-term health, as well as the environment.

We were told by a yoga instructor that through breathing and muscle control, women can also control their menstrual flow.

We were told by a yoga instructor that through breathing and muscle control, women can also control their menstrual flow.

Green Spa Hawaii is in the Ala Moana Building at 1441 Kapiolani Blvd. Call (808) 931-0709. Visit www.greenspahawaii.com.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Plenty to love at Nomads Hawaii

By
April 6th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

In searching for one of the newspaper's Five Things We Love, I bought this marble box inlaid with lapis lazuli, malachite, carnelian and other semi-precious stones, from Nomads Hawaii.

Blame it on Doris Duke. You can't walk away from her Shangri La estate without gaining an appreciation of Islamic arts and the beautiful fixtures and furnishings in her home, drawing from her international travels.

After visiting her newly opened Mughal Suite at Shangri La last year, I fell in love with her marble bath inlaid with floral studies comprising semi-precious stones.

Well, I can’t afford a room of marble, but on a visit to Nandini Bhattacharjee's Nomads Hawaii boutique in Kailua, I recognized the work in inlaid vases and boxes from India, and could afford one of the boxes, now about $117, a 50 percent markdown.

Bhattacharjee traveled the world and brought back the things she loved to share with the rest of us.

Offered are clothing, jewelry and housewares including batiks sarongs (about $28) from Indonesia and handmade bedding from India.

One shelf is devoted to international Fair Trade items made by adult workers who are paid fair wages in safe working conditions, provided with education and healthcare, and using eco-friendly practices.

I could only feature a few objects in the paper, here are a few more:

These are two images I captured last year while writing a story on the opening of Doris Duke's Shangri La Mughal Suite, the heiress' private quarters with adjoining wall-to-wall marble bath.

These are two images I captured last year while writing a story on the opening of Doris Duke's Shangri La Mughal Suite, the heiress' private quarters with adjoining wall-to-wall marble bath.

nomad mughal

At Nomads Hawaii, these handmade stuffed toys from Africa have individual names.

At Nomads Hawaii, these handmade stuffed toys from Africa have individual names.

Handpainted egg cups from India. This set of three is $18.

Handpainted egg cups from India. This set of three is $18.

Umbra Zoola ring holders and cardholders, $12 each.

Umbra Zoola ring holders and cardholders, $12 each.

Carved wood elephant candle holder from India.

Carved wood elephant candle holder from India.

Kokeshi-style figures made in Indonesia.

Kokeshi-style figures made in Indonesia.

Nomads Hawaii is at 131 Hekili St., Suite 112, in Kailua. Call (808) 261-6677.

———

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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