Archive for May, 2015

Van Cleef garden party sparkles

By
May 19th, 2015



Van Cleef & Arpels and Neiman Marcus Honolulu presented a spring/summer 2015 garden party event on May 7 at Neiman Marcus, highlighted by "courses" of diamonds and timepieces featuring the luxury brand's signature butterfly, nature and cultural motifs.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comThis Van Cleef & Arpels Lotus Between the Finger ring folds down to be worn on one finger for versatility.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

This Van Cleef & Arpels Lotus Between the Finger ring folds down to be worn on one finger for versatility.

The enchanted evening began with the music of Streetlight Cadence's Brian Webb, below left, and Jonathon Franklin, with dancer Alexandra Hopley gracing the entry to the VCA boutique that had been walled off with flowers and hedges.

Here's a look at the evening:

Guests arrived to see the area surrounding the VCA boutique transformed into a spring garden venue, and were welcomed in by dancer Alexandra Hopley.

Guests arrived to see the area surrounding the VCA boutique transformed into a spring garden venue, and were welcomed in by dancer Alexandra Hopley.

Hopley danced to the music of Streetlight Cadence's Brian Webb, left, and Jonathon Franklin.

Hopley danced to the music of Streetlight Cadence's Brian Webb, left, and Jonathon Franklin.

Presentation of dinner courses were matched by jewel courses.

Presentation of dinner courses were matched by jewel courses.

A lot of oohs and ahhs accompanied the presentations.

A lot of oohs and ahhs accompanied the presentations.

PHOTO COURTESY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

Party goers were also enchanted by the Lady Arpels Ballerine Enchantée time-on-demand watch, with a ballerina skirt that flutters up to form the wings of a butterfly. The watch was inspired by the 18th century Russian prima ballerina Anna Pavlova, who said, "I've been dreaming that I was a ballerina, and that I was spending my whole life dancing as lightly as a butterfly."

Tiki at work on one of his Digitoons.

Tiki at work on one of his Digitoons.

Reine Ah Moo with her Digitoon portrait.

Reine Ah Moo with her Digitoon portrait.

My Digitoon had me wondering what was going on with my hair.

My Digitoon had me wondering what was going on with my hair.

Van Cleef is also noted for its fragrances, here the scent of gardenias.

Van Cleef is also noted for its fragrances, here the scent of gardenias.

Beautiful peonies at the table.

Beautiful peonies at the table.

Sliced scallops interspersed with layers of black truffle en croute.

Sliced scallops interspersed with layers of black truffle en croute.

Escargot and mushrooms in a bread bowl.

Escargot and mushrooms in a bread bowl.

Guests were able to examine and try on new collections before dinner, and sit for a Digitoon portrait by Tiki.

Neiman Marcus is at Ala Moana Center; call (808) 951-8887.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Mu‘umu‘u Heaven’s ‘Hana Hou’

By
May 14th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAt Deb Mascia's Kailua boutique, Hana Hou Vintage, Nanhee Oliva models a 1950s cocktail dress ($40).

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

At Deb Mascia's Kailua boutique, Hana Hou Vintage, Nanhee Oliva models a 1950s cocktail dress ($40).

Fans of Deb Mascia's retro boho spirit were saddened to hear she closed Mu'umu'u Heaven back in March due to rent inflation, but now they have two places to shop her upcycled apparel and vintage pieces.

After closing her boutique, she refused to answer her phone, which was inundated with calls from concerned clients and nosy reporters. When she finally did check back in, she found one particularly interesting missed call. T Galleria Hawaii by DFS, which had already run successful collaborations with the University of Hawaii at Manoa Department of Apparel Product Design & Merchandising and POW! WOW! Hawai‘i, was interested in bringing her line of new and upcycled apparel fashioned from vintage mu‘umu‘u fabric and aloha wear to its Waikiki clientele.

This globe ($850) is one of the furnishings available at Hana Hou Vintage. It's real job is to make a barfly look like a brainiac. Open it up and ...

This globe ($850) is one of the furnishings available at Hana Hou Vintage. It's real job is to make a barfly look like a brainiac. Open it up and ...

hana hou bar

Her first inclination was to say no, but she agreed to a meeting. By that time, she’d already opened another Kailua shop, Hana Hou Vintage, focused on sharing her vast collection of vintage apparel.

At T Galleria, she said, “I met the whole team, and everyone was so nice, I thought ‘Why not?’”

Then she headed to St. Martin for two weeks. By the time she got home, she found designers had already gone shopping at Re-Use Hawaii to construct the Mu‘umu‘u Heaven popup and showed her plans for an installation that captured the lighthearted energy of her brand.

“They understood my concept and made it very easy to say yes,” she said. The pop-up is slated to be in place through the end of June.

Mascia shows one of the throw pillows fashioned from vintage Hawaiiana fabric, carried at the Mu'umu'u Heaven pop-up inside T Galleria by DFS.

Mascia shows one of the throw pillows fashioned from vintage Hawaiiana fabric, carried at the Mu'umu'u Heaven pop-up inside T Galleria by DFS.

The store within a store is adorned with greenery by local landscape architect and florist, Tamara Rigney, of Paiko.

The store within a store is adorned with greenery by local landscape architect and florist, Tamara Rigney, of Paiko.

The Mu'umu'u Heaven pop-up is also home to some of Mascia’s stash of collectible vintage Americana glassware.

The Mu'umu'u Heaven pop-up is also home to some of Mascia’s stash of collectible vintage Americana glassware.

Also featured as part of the pop-up is a selection of Dale Hope's Hope For Man shirts, along with a small exhibition tracing the roots of his family business. Included is photo of Prince Charles wearing a "Moorea" print shirt during a trip to Hawaii in 1985, when a royal entourage took over 100 rooms at The Kahala. The shirt is available as a numbered, 127-piece limited edition collector's item at the pop-up.

Also featured as part of the pop-up is a selection of Dale Hope's Hope For Man shirts, along with a small exhibition tracing the roots of his family business. Included is photo of Prince Charles wearing a "Moorea" print shirt during a trip to Hawaii in 1985, when a royal entourage took over 100 rooms at The Kahala. The shirt is available as a numbered, 127-piece limited edition collector's item at the pop-up.

Meanwhile, Hana Hou Vintage in Kailua is home to her "untouchables," a collection of vintage apparel she deemed too good to cut up for her upcycled Mu'umu'u Heaven original designs.

Hippie floral pins at Hana Hou Vintage.

Hippie floral pins at Hana Hou Vintage.

She grew up shopping thrift stores in Melbourne, Australia, and admits to dressing like an "old lady" as a pre-teen, developing her individual style as she went along.

Now, she's thinking about writing a book to create more mindfulness about the value of reuse and recyling, and encourage fans of fast fashion to think about the repurcussions of consuming cheap, wear-once-and-throw-away fashion, with its detrimental cost to the planet.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

Beauty tips from Tata Harper

By
May 12th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comA clean-faced Meleana Estes posed for a photo with Tata Harper, right, after the natural beauty expert's skincare workshop.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A clean-faced Meleana Estes posed for a photo with Tata Harper, right, after the natural beauty expert's skincare workshop.

Tata Harper was in town Wednesday to visit Neiman Marcus and introduce the latest additions to her line of all-natural skincare products, made at her Vermont farm. She also conducted a master class for NM clientele, during which she shared her philosophy of healthy living, a journey that, for her, began when her father-in-law fell ill with cancer.

That was when she began to see the way we fill our lives, bathroom counters and medicine cabinets with synthetic ingredients that can have health consequences.

She's been busy since I interviewed her three years ago, adding makeup basics in the form of sheer Lip Treatments and natural-looking and delicious Volumizing Lip and Cheek Tints. I bought the Very Sweet Volumizing Lip and Cheek Tint in a shimmering peach color, that tastes like candy. Everyone left with rosy, glowing skin.

Since the last time I interviewed Tata, she's come up with a basic line of skin-nourishing color products, the sheer lip treatments and Volumizing Lip and Cheek Tints shown here.

Since the last time I interviewed Tata, she's come up with a basic line of skin-nourishing color products, the sheer lip treatments and Volumizing Lip and Cheek Tints shown here.

Participants in her skincare workshop tried no fewer than 10 face products, two bodycare treatments and portable rollerball aromatherapy treatments aimed at reducing stress and irritability. She even has a "Love Potion" geared toward inducing calmness, positivity and happiness, that makes a woman more appealing to men.

I was already a big fan of her Hydrating floral essence, which hydrates skin before applying moisturizer, as well as her Repairative Moisturizer. But she also offers anti-aging serums, and I just have to figure out which one I need most. The treatment options are: Rejuvenating (anti-aging collagen treatment), Boosted Contouring (lifting and firming), Concentrated Brightening (tone correcting), or Elixir Vitae (wrinkle solution).

Also new from Tata Harper: Take-it-with-you aromatherapy rollerball treatments addressing "Irritability," "Bedtime" relaxation and "Stress." There's also a "Love Potion, essential oils for mood enhancement said to make a woman more attractive to men.

Also new from Tata Harper: Take-it-with-you aromatherapy rollerball treatments addressing "Irritability," "Bedtime" relaxation and "Stress." There's also a "Love Potion," essential oils for mood enhancement said to make a woman more attractive to men.

I feel there's a universal consumer sentiment that 100 percent natural cannot possibly be as effective as manmade chemicals, but so far, Tata Harper's products seem to work really well for me. The caveat is that everyone's skin is different, but the brand is growing because more and more people are concerned about the chemicals we use in everyday life, and the smart choice seems to be going the natural route.

It was this notion that set Harper on her journey. After her father-in-law became ill with cancer, she started thinking about the products we use daily, that can be harmful, and, noting a lack of healthful retail options, she simply decided to make her own products, and her skin is flawless.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

RELATED VIDEO:

UHM students present 'AXIS'

By
May 8th, 2015



RUNWAY PHOTOS BY CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / crussell@staradvertiser.comThis gown by Ayaka Hosomi was among the designs shown on the runway during the University of Hawaii at Manoa's annual senior fashion show, "AXIS: point of origin."

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

This gown by Ayaka Hosomi was among the designs shown on the runway during the University of Hawaii at Manoa's annual senior fashion show, "AXIS: point of origin."

The Class of 2015 fashion design students at the University of Hawaii at Manoa scrapped the traditional long catwalk during their annual senior showcase, this year titled, "AXIS: point of origin," which took place Sunday at the Hilton Waikiki Prince Kuhio Hotel.

Pillars in the banquet room didn't offer the best sight lines and called for a workaround. The result was a runway around the room that gave everyone a closeup view of the designs as they were presented.

The collections were strong, and I think the best compliment you can give a designer is to say you want to see more from them. I wanted to see more.

The back view of Hosomi's design. A short dress by the designer was selected to be presented at the Costume Society of America's annual conference May 27 through 30 in San Antonio, Texas.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

The back view of Hosomi's design. A short dress by the designer was selected to be presented at the Costume Society of America's annual conference May 27 through 30 in San Antonio, Texas.

p align="left">This floral dress by Asia Joan Mateo created buzz in the audience when petals dropped to the floor as model Erika Eifler twirled. People weren't sure whether it was intended or whether it represented a wardrobe malfunction. The back view is below.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

This floral dress by Asia Joan Mateo created buzz in the audience when petals dropped to the floor as model Erika Eifler twirled. People weren't sure whether it was intended or whether it represented a wardrobe malfunction. The back view is below.

POSED PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comAsia Joan Mateo mixed jewelry elements into her ultra-feminine designs.

NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Asia Joan Mateo mixed jewelry elements into her ultra-feminine designs.

p align="left">Li King sent out models in xiang-yun-sha fabric, unique to China. It's government protected due to the exacting, region specific mud and taro dye process used in its creation. This design will also be presented at the Costume Society of America's annual conference.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

Li Jin King sent out models in xiang-yun-sha fabric, unique to China. It's government protected due to the exacting, region specific mud and taro dye process used in its creation. This design will also be presented at the Costume Society of America's annual conference.

Eva Blacker wears a maxi from Gabrielle Sanehira's "Mod Nouveau" collection combining a Space Mod aesthetic and panels and inserts of photographic film.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

Eva Blacker wears a maxi from Gabrielle Sanehira's "Mod Nouveau" collection combining a Space Mod aesthetic and panels and inserts of photographic film.

Hayley Hisaka wears a jumpsuit reflecting designer Ayaka Hosomi's Japanese heritage. Her aim was to create contemporary, polished silhouettes incorporating historical elements.

NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Hayley Hisaka wears a jumpsuit reflecting designer Ayaka Hosomi's Japanese heritage. Her aim was to create contemporary, polished silhouettes incorporating historical elements.

Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi delivered a romantic desert flower-inspired collection.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi delivered a romantic desert flower-inspired collection.

Li Jin King was the only designer to send men's looks down the runway.

CINDY ELLEN RUSSELL / CRUSSELL@STARADVERTISER.COM

Li Jin King was the only designer to send men's looks down the runway.

Li Jin King, center, posed with her models after the show.

NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Li Jin King, center, posed with her models after the show.

Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi, seated, posed with her models after the show.

NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi, seated, posed with her models after the show.

THE COLLECTIONS:

GROUP SHOWCASE: "ECO ECLECTICISM"

AYAKA HOSOMI: “LEGACY”

Ayaka Hosomi revisits her Japan heritage through her senior collection, inspired by Japanese textiles.

She grew up with a love of fabric and materials she could manipulate with her hands, and said her work was transformed through a single class in embellishment, which gave her the basics in knitting, crochet and dyeing fabric.

“Everything I learned, I liked, and I wanted to use all the techniques,” she said, and the result showed in her Eco Eclectic group piece, a dress of hand-dyed, sustainable cotton gauze with sculptural, detachable crocheted embellishment.

She said she likes the idea of continuing to work with sustainable or recycled materials. “I think its something we all have to do in the future, and it’s our challenge to make it interesting and different.”

LI JIN KING: “ADAPTATION”

Born and raised in Dalian in Northeast China, it took a move to Hawaii for Li Jin King to discover aspects of Chinese costume lost to a younger generation.

While working with the UHM Historic Costume Collection, she came across a fabric of 100 percent silk, made with a centuries-old, now cultural heritage-protected technique of dyeing fabric over the 60 hottest days of summer, with mud and taro root that imparts an aromatic smell, and unique crackling effect as the garment is worn and ages. The fabric name, xiang-yun-sha, translates as “perfumed cloud clothing,” because of its fragrance and light, airy structure.

“In the creases, it forms a black line, like a tortoise shell,” she explained. According to her mentor, Dr. Shu Hwa Lin, an associate professor with the FDM program, examples of the jiang-yun-sha textiles existed in 5th century China, and export of the fabrics started in the 15th century. It became popular with wealthy patrons throughout Southeast Asia and Russia in the 1920s and ’30s.

King’s collection featured sexy, skin-baring twists on the qipao, the classic Mandarin-collar Chinese dress, as well as menswear comprising silks and reversible apparel utilizing xiang-yun-sha fabric.

By highlighting classic Chinese design, even while making adaptations for today’s wearer, she aims to call attention to some aspects of history being lost.

“I’ve always been fascinated by construction and so much has changed with the qipao. The original garments had no seam lines at the shoulders. Today, they have the seam lines, like Western dress.”

ASIA JOAN MATEO: “JARDIN DE PAPILLONS”

While growing up, Asia Joan Mateo always wanted to be Vera Wang, the figure skater turned bridal designer.

“I attended a lot of weddings and I was always the flower girl wearing the itchy dresses. I was fascinated by the adult dresses and wanted to wear those instead,” she said.

Today, there’s nothing to stop her and she’s brought her love of flowers, butterflies and bridal fashion together in her ultra-femme senior collection with a palette of fuschia, purple and nude colors.

Hers was a romantic collection, and she created a buzz moment when model Erika Eifler twirled in a dress of fabric roses, sending a handful falling around her. People wondered whether that was done on purpose or represented a wardrobe malfunction, so didn't know whether to cheer or gasp.

A suggestion for future fashion shows: In the case of the former scenario, if you want a moment, go big so there's no second-guessing intent.

GABRIELLE SANEHIRA: “MOD NOUVEAU”

Originally a student of photography, Gabrielle Sanehira couldn’t deny her attraction to fashion design. She’d got a taste of it at Kauai High School, where she was involved with theater and costume design, and came to the attention of school officials when altering her boxy school uniform T-shirt to be more form-fitting.

She now incorporates her eye for details and photographic materials in her collection, “Mod Nouveau,” comprising minimalist, mod silhouettes, with accent panels, collars and edging details of large format photo film sheet negatives bearing her own images of water and nature.

“I had to be careful with it because it didn’t have the same flexibility as fabric.”

It took some design modifications to work with the stiff film, but gauging from her Eco Eclectic group design, an American Spirit dress fashioned from the brand’s cigarette boxes, she loves a puzzle.

The sheath dressed is pieced together with darker prints of the cigarette box forming a graphic pattern on the dress.

During her three weeks of working on the dress, she smoked a lot of cigarettes, but said the experience was cathartic.

“It was me finally giving up smoking, working through it,” she said. “While I was working on the dress, I kept think of all the money it costs to smoke.”

GRACE TSUBAKI-NOGUCHI: “MIRAGE”

This year’s senior show marks a second chance for Grace Tsubaki-Toguchi, who had to bow out of the 2013 show due to family crisis.

She found inspiration in a single cactus given to her by her father before his death in December 2013.

“After that, the cactus started to die and I got really sad, but after four months it started to revive.”

She saw that as a sign to go on with her life, and although she could not finish her original line, she found comfort in the colors of the desert, mixed with metallic and sheer element in her current collection of separates and dresses with tiers of color and texture.

“I always liked clean, architectural lines. That hasn’t changed. Only the colors changed.”

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Bouquet of 'roses' for mom

By
May 8th, 2015



PHOTOS COURTESY NEIMAN MARCUSChantecaille Rose Face Oil ($185).

PHOTOS COURTESY NEIMAN MARCUS

Chantecaille Rose Face Oil ($185).

If you’re thinking flowers for Mother’s Day, remember that flowers wilt, so you may want to add something with a little more permanence to that thought.

Everything’s coming up roses in the beauty department, and here are a few options available at Neiman Marcus, where a Spring Scent Event continues through May 10.

Laura Mercier Infusion de Rose Nourishing Oil ($62) and Infusing de Rose Nourishing Cream ($68).

Laura Mercier Infusion de Rose Nourishing Oil ($62) and Infusing de Rose Nourishing Cream ($68).

Fresh Rose Face Mask ($62).

Fresh Rose Face Mask ($62).

Natura Bisse limited edition Diamond Experience Rose Oil ($65).

Natura Bisse limited edition Diamond Experience Rose Oil ($65).

During the event, those who make a purchase of $100 or more in Cosmetics or Fragrance will receive an bag filled with beauty samples.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Jewelers name 2015 winners

By
May 7th, 2015



Denny Wong was named Jewelry Designer of the Year, collecting the highest points for his jewelry designs during the Hawaii Jewelers Association annual design competition, with winners announced during the groups annual banquet May 2 at Honolulu Country Club. Here are the winners in three categories:

JEWELRY UNDER $3,500

HJA JaliRing

First Place: “Jali” ring by Jason Dow. This eternity ring design captures the mysterious ephemeral transparency of intricate jali screens seen in prized Indian architecture. In 18 karat rose gold, framed in black diamonds.

HJA WaterFall

Second Place: “Waterfall” by Carrie Nottage Smith, Na Hoku. This elegant opal inlay and diamond pendant expresses the hues and movement of Hawaii’s waterfalls.

HJA Fire

Third Place: “Fire and Ice” necklace, Denny Wong Designs. An icy blue apatite and fiery pink sapphire are the gems featured in this dramatic white gold pendant.

HJA WaterFall

People’s Choice: “Waterfall,” Na Hoku.

JEWELRY OVER $3,500

HJA Tide

First Place: “Ocean Tides” ring, Maui Divers design team. This ring features a perfect example of Hawaii’s state gem, black coral, surrounded by waves of diamonds.

HJA Bliss

Second Place: “Royal Bliss” ring, by Dona Wong, Keoni Collections. A stunning royal blue tanzanite is the centerpiece of this pendant, with a diamond crown set atop a rich, diamond-decorated lotus design base. Craftsmanship fit for a monarch in white and yellow gold.

HJA Koala

Third Place: “Koala” pendant, Tiara Pearl International. The cute and cuddly koala is a perfect expression for this impressive baroque Australian South Seas pearl.

Delicate and imaginative use of white gold, diamonds, black rhodium and even a stick of wood completes this sculpted design of Australia’s iconic, irresistible living teddy bear.

HJA SnowFlake

People’s Choice: "Snowflake" by Moshe Hakemolo, Diamond Guy Hawaii. The design of this engagement and wedding ring set is as delicate as a snowflake and packs a blizzard of brilliance. Set in 18 karat white gold it features a 3.5 carat round diamond that is surrounded by custom-cut fancy shaped diamonds.

HAWAIIAN-THEMED JEWELRY

HJA Kilauea

First Place: “Kilauea” necklace, Denny Wong Designs. The flickering of red emitted from the unique rose-cut red garnet featured in this 18 karat gold pendant represents Kilauea’s fiery cauldron. The black tourmaline necklace it is dangling from represents the black basalt rock that is Kilauea. Every aspect of this garnet, diamond and tanzanite pendant evokes fire.

HJA Treasured

Second Place: ”Treasured Waters” by Dona Wong, Keoni Collections. Featuring a natural shape precious red coral and flowing diamond studded gold, this pendant expresses the dreamy romantic beauty of Hawaii’s waters. It completes its water motif design with a delightful raindrop filigree pattern on the back.

HJA Plumeria-1

Third Place: “Plumeria Scroll,” gold and diamond pendant, Maui Divers. This pendant features a delicate sculpted plumeria with flowing, diamond accented royal scrolling. A jewelry wardrobe staple for locals and a prize for visitors who might want to bring home a memento of their stay.

HJA He`e

People’s Choice: "He'e (Octopus)" by Donna Shimazu, Na Hoku. The power and grace of the Hawaiian octopus is wonderfully expressed in this powerful slide pendant.

With a gold body and Tahitian black pearl head and diamonds for the eyes this beautiful piece would be the perfect possession for those with the he'e as their aumakua.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Hale'iwa Store Lots hosts preview

By
May 2nd, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comSurfboard signage marks the site of Kamehameha Schools' Hale'iwa Store Lots.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Surfboard signage marks the site of Kamehameha Schools' Hale'iwa Store Lots.

Day trippers have a lot more ways to spend a day in Haleiwa with the opening of Haleiwa Store Lots, a Kamehameha Schools shopping/dining/gathering spot in the vicinity of Matsumoto Shave Ice.

A VIP event took place on Friday to celebrate the project's completion in advance of its free public grand opening from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The family-friendly event will feature walking tours, educational activities, arts and crafts, prize giveaways and entertainment. There are 95 parking stalls.

Resort and leisure apparel at Mahina.

Resort and leisure apparel at Mahina.

A selection of bracelets at Mahina.

A selection of bracelets at Mahina.

During the VIP event, representatives from Kamehameha Schools' Land Assets and Commercial Real Estate Division spoke of the community's strong desire to keep the country, country, and the development on formerly residential zoned land was built with community input. What the community wanted was to see structures simpatico with the nature of Haleiwa, meaning:

» Low rise

» Pedestrian friendly

» Walkways, but no sidewalks

» Historical accuracy in new buildings that would blend in with the old to look like they have stood in the town since plantation times

» To incorporate gathering spaces

» Homegrown merchants and restaurants

Nostalgic setup inside Hale'iwa Fruit Stand.

Nostalgic setup inside Hale'iwa Fruit Stand.

Men's apparel at Kahala.

Men's apparel at Kahala.

A peek inside Malibu Shirts.

A peek inside Malibu Shirts.

The new development appears to have fulfilled those promises, and Hale‘iwa Store Lots is now open with 16 stores:

» Matsumoto Shave Ice

» Whaler’s General Store

» Hale’iwa Fruit Stand

» Clark Little Gallery

» Global Creations

» Greenroom Hawai‘i

» Guava Shop

» Island Vintage Coffee

» Kahala Sportswear

» Mahina

» Mā‘ilikūkahi Hale Kamehameha Schools North Shore Information Center

» Malibu Shirts

» Spam Hawai‘i

» Splash! Hawai‘i

» T&C Surf

» Teddy’s Bigger Burgers

In the coming months, four merchants will open, including Better Homes and Gardens Real Estate Advantage Realty North Shore, Fatboy’s, Rajanee Thai Cuisine and Uncle Bo’s Pupu Bar & Grill.

Pick up a T-shirt along with your shave ice from Matsumoto's.

Pick up a T-shirt along with your shave ice from Matsumoto's.

Their spaces may not yet be open, but that didn't stop Uncle Bo's and Fatboy's from offering a sneak of potential menu items. Above, furikake-crusted ahi over rice with lentils from Fatboy's, and below, Thai-style Manila clams from Uncle Bo's.

Their spaces may not yet be open, but that didn't stop Uncle Bo's and Fatboy's from offering a sneak of potential menu items. Above, furikake-crusted ahi over rice with lentils from Fatboy's, and below, Thai-style Manila clams from Uncle Bo's.


For more information, visit www.haleiwastorelots.com.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

‘Dior and I’ opens on Oahu

By
May 1st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comRaf Simons scrutinizes a classic "New Look" Dior dress in "Dior and I.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Raf Simons scrutinizes a classic "New Look" Dior dress in "Dior and I."

The house of Dior was thrown into upheaval in 2011 when racist statements made by desgner John Galliano got him fired from the design position he had held at the prestigious design house for 15 years. The fashion rumor mill wondered who would, or could, replace him.

It takes many hands to embellish fabric for Dior's couture designs.

‘DIOR AND I’

Opens Friday at Consolidated Theaters Kahala 8

Rumored replacements at the time included Riccardo Tisci of Givenchy, Alber Elbaz of Lanvin, Stefano Pilati of Yves Saint Laurent and Phoebe Philo of Celine.

All made sense, but the fashion world received a double shock when the announcement came in 2012 that Raf Simons had been appointed as Dior’s new creative director.

Simons was not a natural choice. The Belgian designer had studied industrial and furniture design and did not see a fashion show until after graduating in 1991, when an all-white show by Martin Margiela inspired him to pursue fashion. He started with menswear and later, as creative director at Jill Sander, Simons became established as a minimalist designer whose work didn't seem to fit with Dior’s haute grandeur and highly embellished designs.

“Dior and I” focuses on the eight-week honeymoon that marked Simons’ inauguration into the Dior world, tasked from Day 1 to put his first collection on the runway. There is much to be done, and it doesn't help that Simons doesn’t speak much French and has trouble communicating with a staff and management set in their ways, and as obligated to the clientele that keeps the house in business, if not moreso than their creative director. He is angry when deadlines are not met by key staffers who must jet around the world at the command of certain clients.

During a fitting, Simons decides to shorten a dress to make it a more contemporary top.

During a fitting, Simons decides to shorten a dress to make it a more contemporary top.

From his initial meeting with the staffers of the atelier, Simons contemporary approach to work was at odds with the people who worked in this rarified world. Chanel and Dior are the last two houses working in the tradition of haute couture with its own ateliers, one for suits and one for dresses, its couture creations made entirely by hand.

Upon his first meeting with this creative team, when asked what to call him, the designer replies that it's fine to address him as Raf. Uncomfortable with this casualness, staffers say they will call him Mr. Simons.

“Why Raf Simons? He is in menswear,” a seamstress mutters, and it takes a while for them to warm to his aloof persona and understand his method.

PHOTO BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comThis piece from Raf Simons Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2012 collection took its place alongside his predecessors' work at MOCA Shanghai's "Esprit Dior" exhibition in fall 2013. Here's a link to a post on my visit to the exhibition: http://bit.ly/1E1syJV

NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

This piece from Raf Simons Haute Couture Fall/Winter 2012 collection took its place alongside his predecessors' work at MOCA Shanghai's "Esprit Dior" exhibition in fall 2013. Here's a link to a post on my visit to the exhibition: http://bit.ly/1E1syJV

Trained in industrial design, Simons doesn't sketch and instead draws inspiration from images and artwork collected in folders and passed on to the patternmakers and seamstresses, who piece together garments based on these dossiers. They appear happy to let their imaginations run free.

Simons hears the criticisms from the outside world as well, saying even though he worked for a minimal brand, it "does not mean I am a minimalist."

Throughout the process, Simons appears daunted by the challenge of making his own imprint on a legacy so strong, set in the mere decade Christian Dior ran his atelier, beginning with his New Look in 1947, a time when people were eager to forget about World War II. Dior got rid of boxy, uniform-look styles for women, in favor of rounded voluptuousness focusing on soft shoulders, voluminous skirts and nipped in waists.

Studying this legacy, Simons said he was amazed by how contemporary Dior's designs remain, but that he wanted to take a radical approach to modernizing, wanting it to be "more dynamic because women are more dynamic today."

French filmmaker Frédéric Tcheng directed and produced this film. He also co-produced "Valentino: The Last Emperor, directed by Matt Tyrnauer, but where that film was filled with stunning visuals and poignancy, "Dior and I" runs cool.

For a fashion film, there is very little fashion on display until the very end, with Simons triumphant debut Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2012 collection.

There is no suspense because the audience already knows Simons first collection is successful. Tcheng is more focused on Simons struggle, but that entails him sitting, chin in hand, mutely worrying. Who wouldn't do that? It's not enough for a fashion film.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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