Fashion Tribe

Make-and-take at Sedona

July 29th, 2015
PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comJewelry-making instructor Trisha Cortez shows the array of beads and supplies available at Sedona, where she teaches classes in wire-wrapping and macrame bracelets.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Jewelry-making instructor Trisha Cortez shows the array of beads and supplies available at Sedona, where she teaches classes in wire-wrapping and macrame bracelets.

What did I do on my summer vacation? Thanks to Sedona, I learned to make macrame shamballa bracelets in a single afternoon with instructor Trisha Cortez.

The Ward Village shop recently began offering a couple of beginners’ jewelry-making classes in wire wrapping and macrame knotting.

The reason I wanted to try my hand at knotting is because I've purchased such bracelets around town and worry about the day the cords give out and I'm left with beads, stones and gems I would no longer be able to wear. I don't know who to turn to for repair so figured it would be good to learn.

I was drawn to the shamballa bracelets that have become popular over the past few years. Shamballa is a mythical kingdom that Tibetan Buddhist believe in, and the bracelets are a symbol of enlightenment, peace and spirituality. Each stone and bracelet has a different meaning for individuals. I chose stones representing calm, energy, positivity, clarity, love and protection.

The process of making shamballa bracelets starts with bead selection. I chose to work with amethyst, rose quartz, adventurine and malachite. Some students were smart to show up a half hour before class started to select their beads. Students have the option of purchasing or bringing in their own beads.

The process of making shamballa bracelets starts with bead selection. I chose to work with amethyst, rose quartz, adventurine and malachite. Some students were smart to show up a half hour before class started to select their beads. Students have the option of purchasing or bringing in their own beads.

The process seemed intimidating because I had no clue how the knots worked, except from a wearers' point of view. Even after she introduced the concept, I and fellow classmates were like, "We're supposed to finish that much in two hours?"

Stringing the beads.

Stringing the beads.

I had my first bracelet finished and a turquoise one in process by class end.

I had my first bracelet finished and a turquoise one in process by class end.

Class sizes are limited for individual attention, and boy did we need it. Luckily, I asked in advance if Cortez is patient, and yes she is a saint to put up with me. But once we got into the flow and rhythm, the process was fairly easy and zenlike. You just need to know your left from your right, and over and under.

I became somewhat addicted and wanted to make a couple more bracelets right away. It involved no more than purchasing the cording, beads and a macrame board for home use. For finishing the ends of the nylon cord, Trisha used a lighter, but I am afraid to be that close to fire so I used the flame from my gas range and an unfolded paper clip.

I went back to the store a few days later because I was in need of a carnelian bracelet.

I went back to the store a few days later because I was in need of a carnelian bracelet.

The next wire wrapping classes are at 10:30 a.m. Aug. 9, 23 and Sept. 13; cost is $35 per session, includes materials and a stone to wrap. You may also bring in your own stone or purchase a different stone on site.

Macrame knotting classes will be held at 2:30 p.m. the same days; cost is $26 per session, includes cord for a bracelet. Students may also purchase beads on site to weave into their custom design.

Call Cortez at (808) 591-8010 on Fridays and Saturdays for class openings and availability.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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