Archive for July, 2015

'Taste' reprises UH senior show

By
July 7th, 2015



The Associated Chinese University Women hosted its annual fundraiser, "A Taste of Creativity," on June 27, with a reprise of the 2015 senior fashion show staged by recent graduates of the University at Manoa School of Fashion Design and Merchandising. The students whose works will be showcased are: Li Jin King, Gabrielle Sanehira, Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi, Ayaka Hosomi and Asia Joan Mateo.

More than 350 ACUW members and guests showed up at the Hilton Hawaiian Village for entertainment by Frank DeLima, market place and bake sale.

PHOTOS COURTESY ACUWRecent University of Hawaii graduates staged a repeat performance of their senior showcase during the ACUW fundraiser fashion show. This design is by Li Jin King.

PHOTOS COURTESY ASSOCIATED CHINESE UNIVERSITY WOMEN

Recent University of Hawaii graduates staged a repeat performance of their senior showcase during the ACUW fundraiser fashion show. This design is by Li Jin King.

Gown by Ayaka Hosomi.

Gown by Ayaka Hosomi.

Desert flower-inspired creation by Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi.

Desert flower-inspired creation by Grace Tsubaki-Noguchi.

Ayako Hosomi's models take their final walk.

Ayaka Hosomi's models take their final walk.

ACUW was founded in 1931 by 12 Chinese women friends who wanted to retain the social ties they had developed in college, while also perpetuating Chinese culture and contributing charitable and volunteer services to Hawaii communities.

Funds raised by the fashion show help provide scholarships to Hawaii students attending a four-year college.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

HIDESIGNCOMMUNE debuts

By
July 1st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comCURATE DECOR + DESIGN suspended racks from the ceiling of Kakaako Agora for the inaugural HIDESIGNCOMMUNE. Considering all the hard work that went into the space design, it was a shame it had to be taken down overnight to ready the space for another event. It seems they could have kept the market open over the weekend. Maybe next year.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

CURATE DECOR + DESIGN suspended racks from the ceiling of Kakaako Agora for the inaugural HIDESIGNCOMMUNE. Considering all the hard work that went into the space design, it was a shame it had to be taken down overnight to ready the space for another event. It seems they could have kept the market open over the weekend. Maybe next year.

Nineteen new and established Hawaii designers banded together to launch the inaugural annual design and retail event, HIDESIGNCOMMUNE, a fashion show and marketplace promoting local design talent. The free event took place Saturday at Kakaako Agora.

“We hope this event will build connections among designers, foster growth for small businesses, and increase public engagement in local design and fashion,” said event director Reise Kochi, bringing up a weak spot I've noticed whenever and wherever fashion events take place.

That is, the shortage of public engagement with fashion and design. I started thinking about this last fall during Hawai'i Fashion Month and Honolulu Fashion Week, when, as important as the showcases were, most of the audience comprised friends and family of the designers. Where were the regular people, those with no connections to the fashion, design, beauty or media industries?

One of my thoughts was that the fashion set can be off-putting to people who don't want to feel alienated in a room of so-called beautiful people.

Reise Kochi talked about the Kakaako Agora setup with M33Ms Emiko Miyazawa, back from intensive jewelry studies in New York. Can't wait to see what she comes up with next!

Reise Kochi talked about the Kakaako Agora setup with M33Ms Emiko Miyazawa, back from intensive jewelry studies in New York. Can't wait to see what she comes up with next!

Then there is the notion that this may be the result of budget cuts leading to lack of arts education and appreciation in the schools and people growing up with the idea that things like art, design and fashion are unnecessary luxuries only meant for the wealthy.

When I think back on my childhood and how I got to this place of appreciating beauty, the arts and the hands that create, I realize how fortunate I was. Unbelievable as it seems today, attending humble Waipahu Elementary was much like attending a private school. We had a tremendous arts program, so I grew up drawing, painting, throwing pottery and handbuilding clay, producing puppet shows, performing in band, exploring bookbinding, and many, many other such areas of study. More important than learning an artistic skill set is that such classes also encourage a sense of play and imagination.

I took it for granted that every school had these programs, but in talking to many other people who are products of our public schools, they had no such programs, and I think it shows in the lack of imagination to solve this state's many problems.

Solutions, instead, must come from all of us at a grassroots level, and in the case of supporting local talent it's easy. Wear local. This is another weak spot I noticed during Fashion Month, when I make an effort to wear creations by local designers only to observe that few others do. Maybe local fashion needs a movement similar to that of the food industry, which has been very successful in promoting the "eat local" idea.

While the idea of island apparel might have been perceived as kitschy and unfashionable before, what we saw during HIDESIGNCOMMUNE were styles that transcend the islands, and can be worn anywhere in the world, created by people with a contemporary, global outlook.

Participating designers were Common Goods, Rumi Murakami, Allison Izu, Reise Kochi, Gillia, Salt Liko, Moon Collective, Evening Invitation, Issa de' Mar, M33Ms, Chad Aoyagi, Ten Tomorrow, Ryan Ota, Mojobeebee, Spark, Andy South, Virginia Paresa, S.tory Standards, B. D'Angelo and Tutuvi.

As the world grows warmer, there's no reason Hawaii can't be at the forefront of warm-weather clothing trends. We've had decades to practice.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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