Archive for November, 2015

'Dogs in Coats' at Max Mara

By
November 30th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comWilliam Wegman's "Dogs in Coats" series arrives at Max Mara for an event taking place 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 1.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

William Wegman's "Dogs in Coats" series arrives at Max Mara for an event taking place 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 1.

Max Mara is welcoming a special exhibition of William Wegman’s iconic "Dogs in Coats" photography series featuring images of Weimaraners in Max Mara’s signature 101801 double-breasted cashmere and wool beaver coats.

The exhibition debuted in Boston, where Wegman—who rose to fame with his Weimaraner portraits—earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from Massachusetts College of Art. The show made its way to Chicago, New York, Toronto, Houston, San Francisco and cities in between before arriving at the Waikiki store for a shopping event taking place 6 to 8 p.m. Dec. 1.

Max Mara originally commissioned Wegman to create a series of eight images featuring its 101801 coat in celebration of the brand's 50th anniversary in 2001. In celebration of the renewal of "Dogs in Coats," Max Mara is offering a reproduction of 30 limited edition 101801 coats with the original silhouette and camel color. Exclusive Dogs in Coats notecards will be included with every purchase. Guests will also receive an exclusive signed edition of Wegman’s book, "Polaroids," with a qualifying purchase of $2,000 or more.

The Max Mara store is at 2186 Kalakaua Ave. Call 926-6161.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

From one runway to another

By
November 25th, 2015



Hawaii designer Kaypee Soh, right, with Japan model/actress Hinano and center, AULA designer Yukimi Kawashima.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Hawaii designer Kaypee Soh, right, with Japan model/actress Hinano and center, AULA designer Yukimi Kawashima.

As a sponsor of the second annual Honolulu Fashion Week, Hawaiian Airlines presented a Runway to Runway fashion show of international designers from Hawaii and destinations served on its travel routes, and partnered with a handful of Honolulu Community College Fashion Technology Program graduates and other emerging designers for a unique experiment in upcycling as a fun way to demonstrate social and environmental responsibility.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comOne of Korean designer Lie Sangbong's creations, presented during the Hawaiian Airlines Presents: Runway to Runway fashion show.

One of Korean designer Lie Sangbong's creations, presented during the Hawaiian Airlines Presents: Runway to Runway fashion show.

The HCC graduates and participating designers from The Cut Collective + Creative Lab’s Fashion Immersive Program were invited to participate in the airline’s Cabin[to]Couture project as a platform to showcase their skills using first-class and coach seat materials that were removed from planes after HA rejuvenated the cabin of its Boeing B717 neighbor island aircraft earlier this year with modern, lightweight seats.

The upcycled garments and accessories made from the old seat fabric were unveiled in a small exhibition that greeted fashion week participants over the weekend.

When approached with the project, Joy Nagaue, professor of the Fashion Technology Program at HCC said, “I accepted; our students can do anything!”

And so they can. The work shown by Randy Oribello (Class of 2014), Chai Lim (Class of 2013) and Jacky Lau (Class of 2013), was nothing short of amazing in detail, and even more impressive given the weight, thickness and inflexibility of the fabric.

This airline seat, above, became this dress, below.

This airline seat, above, became this dress, below. The upcycling challenge was part of Hawaiian Airlines “Cabin[to]Couture” challenge to emerging local designers.

Chai Lim was inspired by the notion of air and flying in creating an airy, short skirt paired with a clean, structured strapless top. The 2013 HCC graduate works at Tori Richards, as a pattern technician.

Chai Lim was inspired by the notion of air and flying in creating an airy, short skirt paired with a clean, structured strapless top. The 2013 HCC graduate works at Tori Richards, as a pattern technician.

Making my way through the market place toward the end of fashion week, I overheard one vendor refer to Oribello as "the grommet king" due to his corsetry expertise.

Other Fashion Immersive participants were clothing designers Chanterelle Chantara and Lizzy Chitamitre, jewelry designer Emiko Miyazawa, textile and handbag designer Jana Lam.

“Fashion and design have always been deep-rooted in the Hawaiian Airlines brand,” said Alisa Onishi, director of brand management at Hawaiian Airlines. “This project allows us to give back to our local community through education in a very unique and original way.” You can read a bit more about the airlines' fashion history in one of my older posts.

Then at 8 p.m. Saturday, lights dimmed for the Hawaiian Airlines presents Runway to Runway show featuring the capsule collections of Hawaii's Kaypee Soh; Tokyo's AULA, designed by Yukimi Kawashima; Ellery from Sydney, designed by Kym Ellery; Todd Snyder from New York; and Lie Sangbong from Seoul.

A cage dress presented by Korea's Lie Sangbong.

A cage dress presented by Korea's Lie Sangbong.

A gown by Lie Sangbong.

A gown by Lie Sangbong.

An ensemble by AULA's Yukimi Kawashima.

An ensemble by AULA's Yukimi Kawashima.

Randy Oribello’s “patchwork” corseted bustier is layered with strips of main cabin seat covers paired with a short skirt and peplum. Love the use of the fabric in the bustier's back detail, below. The 2014 HCC graduate now works in the costume department at Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa at Ko Olina.

Randy Oribello’s “patchwork” corseted bustier is layered with strips of main cabin seat covers paired with a short skirt and peplum. Love the use of the fabric in the bustier's back detail, below. The 2014 HCC graduate now works in the costume department at Aulani, A Disney Resort & Spa at Ko Olina.

hawncorsetback

Jacky Lau was inspired by the shapes within the seat covers and created a futuristic tail jacket paired with fitted cargo pants lined with pocket details, below. A sales associate at Macy's, he said his pursuit of design stems from an interest in cosplay.

Jacky Lau was inspired by the shapes within the seat covers and created a futuristic tail jacket paired with fitted cargo pants lined with pocket details, below. A sales associate at Macy's, he said his pursuit of design stems from an interest in cosplay.

hawn detail

hawn detail2

It was a fantastic showcase for all, and I'm looking forward to seeing Kaypee Soh's full collection in December.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Kini Zamora Spring/Summer 2016

By
November 22nd, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKini Zamora posed backstage with a couple of his models after the presentation of his Spring/Summer 2016 collection at Honolulu Fashion Week.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Kini Zamora posed backstage after his fashion show at the Hawai'i Convention Center.

Kini Zamora has been one busy guy, traveling to Austin, Tex., in August for "Project Runway's "Werk" fashion show, to Fashion Week Los Angeles in October, and opening his shop The Clique by KZ, last month.

And sending 40 looks down the runway during his Spring/Summer 2016 showcase at Honolulu Fashion Week on Friday.

Out went last year's sportswear in favor of feminine dresses and jumpsuits. His color palette for women ranged from creme florals to a mix of muted and shiny metal for evening.

Most striking were dazzling evening gowns of feather-light, near transparent silver and orange metallics. There were also short, pleated metallic skirts that the bold-hearted can pull off by day.

More structured pieces showcased the technique that got him to the finale of "Project Runway." (See the video below.)

Interspersed with the women's wear were casual pieces for men who have not advanced as far as women in the fashion realm. T-shirts and tank tops bore the word "Kane," as if none of us could guess by eyeing the beefcake!

One of Kini's "Project Runway" pals, Sean Kelly, was there to show his support.

One of Kini's "Project Runway" pals, Sean Kelly, was there to show his support.

Chuching Yang back stage in one of Zamora's designs.

Chuching Yang back stage in one of Zamora's designs.

Chuching Yang and Meg Akim in evening ensembles.

Chuching Yang and Meg Akim in evening ensembles.

Zamora's male and female models wore jewelry by Pharoah Beads, by local designers now based in Las Vegas.

Zamora's male and female models wore jewelry by Pharoah Beads, by local designers now based in Las Vegas.

Before the show, Kini's 40 ensembles lined up as dressers, below, study the looks to be created.

Before the show, Kini's 40 ensembles lined up as dressers, below, study the looks to be created.

kini backstae

Back stage after the show, I spotted designer Sean Kelly, winner of Kini's "Project Runway" Season 13. I tried to shoot the two from a low angle, which had Kelly saying, "I'm up here." So funny because that's the line one of my beautiful friends uses when men are talking to her boobs.

We had a nice chat about his own travels post-"Runway," and how he has to balance design work/time with the demands of celebrity. He also spoke about growing up in New Zealand in a small place where he had nothing to do, so his creativity stems from having to entertain himself.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Fashion Week opens in Waikiki

By
November 21st, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com Honolulu Fashion Week's "Live Aloha" show opened with Grace Lee, left, interviewing New York Fashion Week creator Fern Mallis, and local-born curator in charge of The Costume Insitute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harold Koda.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Honolulu Fashion Week's "Live Aloha" show opened with Grace Lee, left, interviewing New York Fashion Week creator Fern Mallis, and local-born curator in charge of The Costume Insitute, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Harold Koda.

Honolulu Fashion Week opened Friday with a marketplace of local brands and "Live Aloha" fashion show featuring about 25 local designers and brands at the Hawai'i Convention Center.

One of the runway looks.

One of the runway looks.

Among those represented, big and small were Malia Jones, Matt Bruening, Ari South, Roberta Oaks, Sig Zane, Bliss Lau, Reyn Spooner, Florencia Arias, Allison Izu, Rumi Murakami, Ten Tomorrow and Language of the Birds. Credit for styling the local showcases goes to Don Sumada, originally from Hawaii, who's now a freelance editorial and fashion show stylist based in New York City.

The show opened with Grace Lee briefly interviewing special guests in town for the event, fashion royalty Fern Mallis, who started New York Fashion Week in 1993, and Harold Koda, the local-born curator in charge of the prestigious Costume Institute, Metropolitan Museum of Art.

I was able to interview both, who are as humble as can be given their stature in the fashion/museum world.

I had a seat, but ended up sitting on the floor for the best video angle. As a result, everyone who said hello, like fashion show producer Lynne O'Neill and Harold Koda, had to bend way down to greet me. Sorry about that!

I had a seat, but ended up sitting on the floor for the best video angle. As a result, everyone who said hello, like fashion show producer Lynne O'Neill and Harold Koda, had to bend way down to greet me. Sorry about that!

Pierre, dressed in an indigo kerchief for the show, at the CHAI Studio booth within the fashion week marketplace.

Pierre, dressed in an indigo kerchief for the show, at the CHAI Studio booth within the fashion week marketplace.

Jana Higa of Blue Bird Jewelry showed some of her latest creations in the market place.

Jana Higa of Blue Bird Jewelry showed some of her latest creations in the marketplace.

Dexter Doi and Carol D'Angelo of Ecolicious, started their company with eco tote bags long before the plastic bag ban, and have since moved into apparel. Next year, they may enter the cut-and-sew phase of their business. Many locally educated designers know Carol as a former instructor at the University of Hawaii apparel design program and former curator of the UH Textile Collection.

Dexter Doi and Carol D'Angelo of Ecolicious, started their company with eco tote bags long before the plastic bag ban, and have since moved into apparel. Next year, they may enter the cut-and-sew phase of their business. Many locally educated designers know Carol as a former instructor at the University of Hawaii apparel design program and former curator of the UH Textile Collection.

In case you want to catch the close of the event today, the fashion week marketplace will be open until 5 p.m. Admission is free.

You might also be able to catch the Hawai‘i Pacific Health—Beautiful Survivors runway show at 2 p.m., during which cancer survivors of various ages will step onto the runway in apparel by Hawaii-based designers. Tickets are available on a first-come, first-serve basis; click here to purchase $25 reserved tickets.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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International model search on

By
November 20th, 2015



ELI SCHMIDT PHOTOHawaii-born international model Keke Lindgard modeled a Bliss Lau volcano bead dress worn over a Matt Bruening evening gown during last year's inaugural Honolulu Fashion Week.

COURTESY ELI SCHMIDT

Hawaii-born international model Keke Lindgard modeled a Bliss Lau volcano bead dress worn over a Matt Bruening evening gown during last year's inaugural Honolulu Fashion Week.

Are you the next Keke Lindgard? The local model, back home for Honolulu Fashion Week, has walked Paris runways, been featured on international magazine covers and been the face of Gucci Eyewear?

Find out if you have the look of an international superstar during the Honolulu Fashion Week Model Search taking place 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday at the Hawai'i Convention Center.

A panel of judges are searching for models between the ages of 15 to 24 years old. Females should be 5-foot-8 or taller, and guys between 5-foot-11 to 6-foot-3. Bring one to two portfolio images.

Models should wear:

» Simple, form fitting clothes

» Tight jeans or short skirts and tight tank tops or T-shirts

» Heels for girls

» No slippers

» Clean hair and clean face (no product in your hair and very minimal make up)

» Bring a bikini (women)

Judges include Roman Young, Wilhelmina International; Bobby Gutierrez, Wilhelmina Models, NYC; Damon Rutland, NOMAD Management; Lynne Hanzawa O’Neill, fashion show director; Lashauna Downie, Bliss Models and Talent; Ryan Brown, Wilhelmina Hawai‘i; and Joy Kam, Kathy Muller Talent and Modeling Agency.

Models will be seen on a first-come, first-served basis, with the last model seen at 12:30 p.m. Selected models will have an opportunity to be featured in next year's fashion week event.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Lolitas drop in at Museum of Art

By
November 19th, 2015



The Honolulu Museum of Art hosted an opening reception this week for its latest exhibition, "Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion," continuing through April 3, 2016.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comJapan street artist Minori is in town for the opening of Honolulu Museum of Art's new exhibition, "Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion." She's with the museum's textiles curator Sara Oka, who created the exhibition.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Japan street artist Minori is in town for the opening of Honolulu Museum of Art's new exhibition, "Harajuku: Tokyo Street Fashion." She's with the museum's textiles curator Sara Oka, who created the exhibition.

In town for the occasion were Japan streetwear artist Minori—dramatically dressed and in shironuri, or white face, makeup—and Juliette et Justine designer Mari Nakamura, who both graciously posed for photographs with guests, many of them fans of colorful and flamboyant Harajuku style, and dressed for the occasion.

True to the spirit of dress as an expression of creativity and fantasy, the museum created an "Alice in Wonderland" space with giant mushroom, forest thicket and March Hare.

Coincidentally, 2015 marks the 150th anniversary of Lewis Carroll's "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Realizing I know the story by osmosis yet have never actually read it, I just bought the anniversary edition of the book, illustrated by Salvador Dali.

For the background of the Harajuku exhibition, see my earlier post.

If you feel you missed the excitement, mark your calendar for next year, when the following events will take place:

» Jan 28, 2016: Meet guest artist Misako Aoki, president of the Japan Lolita Association, 10 a.m. to noon in the exhibition gallery. Free with museum entry.

» Jan. 29, 2016: ARTafterDARK: Kawaii Hawai‘i-themed event focused on Harajuku. Misako Aoki will be in the exhibition gallery, posing for fan selfies. Event runs 6 to 9 p.m.; $25 general admission. Free for museum members.

» Feb. 21, 2016: Bank of Hawaii Family Sunday: Mori Girl and Steam Boy. Free event will feature art activies and anime and manga related films, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Many guests showed up outfitted for the occasion. From left are Cat Agena, Chris Minn and Angela.

Many guests showed up outfitted for the occasion. From left are Cat Agena, Chris Minn and Angela.

>Dezerae Leon Guerrero is one of the models who will be walking the floor of the exhibition. She's wearing a mix of Vivienne Westwood and pieces created by her mom. She also sews her own garments. The hat is from Alice and the Pirates.

>

Dezerae Leon Guerrero is one of the models who will be walking the floor of the exhibition. She's wearing a mix of Vivienne Westwood and pieces created by her mom. She also sews her own garments. The hat is from Alice and the Pirates.

Brent Anbe accessorized with a Party City bow and crown accented with photos of his dog Stewie. Yes, the name was inspired by "Family Guy."

Brent Anbe accessorized with a Party City bow and crown accented with photos of his dog Stewie. Yes, the name was inspired by "Family Guy."

Also in town for the event was Juliette et Justine designer Mari Nakamura, right, pictured with Sara Oka.

Also in town for the event was Juliette et Justine designer Mari Nakamura, right, pictured with Sara Oka.

Aileen Uedoi, left, in Juliette et Justine, and Christi Kim in Baby the Stars Shine Bright. Both say they tend to dress in classic Lolita style, but dressed in sweet Lolita style for the occasion.

Aileen Uedoi, left, in Juliette et Justine, and Christi Kim in Baby the Stars Shine Bright. Both say they tend to dress in classic Lolita style, but dressed in sweet Lolita style for the occasion.

Kari Chu in dress and accessories by Angelic Pretty.

Kari Chu in dress and accessories by Angelic Pretty.

Among garments on view is this kawaii, sweet and innocent decora/fairy kei design by Nile Perch. Love the unicorns.

Among garments on view is this kawaii, sweet and innocent decora/fairy kei design by Nile Perch. Love the unicorns.

After strolling the exhibition, stop by the museum shop for Harajuku key chains, jewelry, books and more.

After strolling the exhibition, stop by the museum shop for Harajuku key chains, jewelry, books and more.

The show is open during museum hours, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays, through April 3, 2016. Museum admission is $10 and includes same-day admission to Honolulu Museum of Art Spalding House; youths 17 and younger are admitted free. Call (808) 532-8700 or visit www.honolulumuseum.org.

UNRELATED TO the museum's exhibition, but of interest to anime and cosplay fans, the first Anime Matsuri will take place at the Hawai'i Convention Center next weekend.

Events include a Lolita Tea Party, Maid Cafe, concert and cosplay fashion show. Special guests are Reika, described as Japan's No. 1 cosplayer with 18 years of cosplay experience and more than 500 costumes, and Stella Chuu, a New York City-based cosplayer and burlesque performer who merges pop culture and striptease.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Kensei at Greystones Mansion

By
November 18th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKensei, center, posed for pictures after his fashion show with his models, songstress Cathy Foy, left, and Dale Young.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

Kensei, center, posed for pictures after his fashion show with his models, songstress Cathy Foy, left, and Dale Young.

Stylist Kensei staged an intimate fashion show for 20 of his friends at Greystones Mansion on Sunday.

The presentation featured fall looks including a 1970s boho-inspired segment, and evening looks showcasing the layering of textiles, textures, jewelry and accessories with Kensei-style ingenuity.

Cathy Roberts in one of Kensei's evening ensembles.

Cathy Roberts in one of Kensei's evening ensembles.

Segments were introduced by songstress Cathy Foy, who set the tone of the shows with disco-era songs: Abba's "Dancing Queen" and Donna Summer's "The Last Dance," and Broadway's "South Pacific" tune, "Bali Hai."

Makiki's  graceful Greystones Mansion was the setting for the elegant show.

Makiki's graceful Greystones Mansion was the setting for the elegant show.

The 1970s-inspired segment also had a Southwest vibe with plenty of leather, fringe and statement jewelry.

The 1970s-inspired segment also had a Southwest vibe with plenty of leather, fringe and statement jewelry.

Radasha Hoohuli in a beaded evening ensemble.

Radasha Hoohuli in a beaded evening ensemble.

A special place was held for long-time Kensei friend, Jane Lyman, who died April 29 at the age of 93. The last time Kensei staged such an intimate show was in his living room, to mark Lyman's 90th birthday.

I missed the beginning of the show, but was told that at the start, a giant moth fluttered through the living room, that portends a visit from the deceased. There were many that felt Jane was there with us. Certainly, she would have loved to be there and would have enjoyed the show immensely.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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Ted Baker opens doors

By
November 18th, 2015



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comA peek into the windows at the new Ted Baker London store in Ala Moana Center's Ewa Wing Expansion.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / NKAM@STARADVERTISER.COM

A peek into the windows at the new Ted Baker London store in Ala Moana Center's Ewa Wing Expansion.

Ted Baker London hosted a grand opening party Nov. 10, two days before the boutique opened its doors in Ala Moana Center's new Ewa Wing.

The luxury clothing brand is known for its distinct use of pattern and color and a quintessential British sensibility, unconventional and irreverent, with attention to detail that to learned eyes deliver something out of the ordinary.

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The charming invite made note of Ted Baker's roots as a shirt specialist and the company's new home in Hawaii.

The charming invite made note of Ted Baker's roots as a shirt specialist and the company's new home in Hawaii.

I've always been a bit obsessed with British style, so became the first to make a purchase from the new boutique, a pretty floral flared skirt. Their women's fashion combine retro ladylike prettiness and classic lines with a bit of cheek and sass that makes it fun, not too serious.

Jenny Kim, left, and Tarynn Nago wear dresses by Ted Bake, with the boutique's dressing rooms as a backdrop.

Jenny Kim, left, and Tarynn Nago wear dresses by Ted Bake, with the boutique's dressing rooms as a backdrop.

Spools of thread that are part of the decor, convey a sense of London tailoring.

Spools of thread that are part of the decor, convey a sense of London tailoring.

Ladylike goves.

Ladylike goves.

The feminine bow is a Ted Baker signature.

The feminine bow is a Ted Baker signature.

Cocktails served up in coconut cups.

Cocktails served up in coconut cups.

Not to be ignored, Ted Baker gives equal time to menswear, for men who want to get noticed.

A well-dressed woman is matched by a dapper gentleman.

A well-dressed woman is matched by a dapper gentleman.

Daniel Morales in Ted Baker, with the boutique's dressing rooms as a backdrop.

Daniel Morales in Ted Baker, with the boutique's dressing rooms as a backdrop.

As one of the first of the 30-plus new stores to open its doors, party-goers that evening were greeted by security outside the construction barricade. Once the doors opened, the first glimpse of the beautiful new wing and the lighted store were revealed. The barricades are now history!

As one of the first of the 30-plus new stores to open its doors, party-goers that evening were greeted by security outside the construction barricade. Once the doors opened, the first glimpse of the beautiful new wing and the lighted store were revealed. The barricades are now history!

During a weekend of fashion shows celebrating the opening and the fall season, Ted Baker was among the brands featured on Ala Moana's Center Stage. See the video below.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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