Archive for February, 2016

'Project Runway': Like déjà vu

By
February 25th, 2016



PHOTO COURTESY LIFETIME

Kini Zamora works on his garment on the set of "Project Runway All Stars."

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5
Episode 3 recap: "A Little Bit Country, A Little Bit Rock N Roll"

The episode starts in the studio, where host Alyssa Milano shows up and introduces the country music band Little Big Town, best known for the song "Girl Crush."

Band members explain the two different fashion styles of the two female singers, the brunette Karen Fairchild (rock 'n' roll, modern and vintage) and blonde Kimberly Schlapman (girl next door). Proceeding from their differences, the designers are told they will be working in pairs to come with an "opposites attract" look for the women to wear on the red carpet of the Academy of Country Music Awards. Each designer will be responsible for one look in the always dreaded pairs challenge.

Last week's winning designer Sam Donovan is put in the all-powerful position of assembling the teams and his first move is to pick Kini Zamora as his partner, referring to the Hawaii designer as "some kind of wizard."

Designers are given a budget of $600, $300 for each look, and once they start working, Kini asks Sam how he decided to put the designers together.

In teaming Stella Zotis with Valerie Mayen, Sam explains that Valerie is like bubblegum and Stella is like tar, making them natural style opposites and setting them up for success. He describes Layana Aguilar as having a more couture style and Emily Payne being more street, etc.

It actually works on one level because Stella, who always wants to work in leather, wants to be naughty and Valerie is her nice counterpart. But their personalities clash because Valerie is a vocal taskmaster and Stella is more laidback. As Valerie's insults add up, Stella says, "Someone should give that broad a chill pill."

Members of Little Big Town, from left, Philip Sweet, Karen Fairchild, Jimi Westbrook and Kimberly Schlapman.

This is the first time in two seasons that I see Kini frustrated. He's afraid of being in the bottom two, but looking at the other designers' creations, I don't think that's a possibility at all. But he's angry by the amount of help Sam needs.

Sam acknowledges Kini's speed and help, saying he just turns around and all of a sudden there's a couture top on his manikin.

Kini says he's angry because he has to sew the zipper and finish Sam's pants, and that's the reason he doesn't like team challenges. He must have been sensing a déjà vu moment. This also happened to him in his initial "Project Runway" appearance, when he created the look that gave Sean Kelly a first place win. Even so, they've remained friends. In fact, Sean came out to support Kini during his November runway show for Honolulu fashion week, and he'll be back here on March 18 to join Kini, Ari South and fellow "Project Runway" alum Alexander Knox for a fashion show at the 5th annual Susan G. Komen Hawaii Pink Tie Ball at the Royal Hawaiian Hotel. More details at www.komenhawaii.org.

With Sam being from Boston and Kini from Hawaii, when mentor Zanna Roberts Rassi visits for a critique, they suggest a "beach and bitch" theme. It's more like Kini's breezy to Sam's structured, masculine pant look. I don't understand when Rassi tells Kini his look is too 1990s, because it is very current and right on the spring cold/bare shoulder trend. Given the show's filming before last fall's New York Fashion Week, the look really put Kini ahead of the pack.

Both of these looks could be credited to Kini, even though this was the result of a team challenge. I thought these were the most red carpet ready looks.

He creates a mermaid fishtail gown with watercolor blue chiffon draping, borrowing from last week's movement challenge. It looks beautiful coming down the runway. Daniel Franco says Kini's color and fabric choices are "mesmerizing." It's an advantage coming from Hawaii. We know color, and we know print.

Franco and Mitchell Perry choose a "pleasure and pain" theme with Daniel creating a bondage look see-through gown and Mitchell creates a pink floral bodice attached to a sloppy, bulky bubblegum pink skirt. He has zero technique and during the judging is told that his creation looks like a craft project that helps drive the team to the bottom.

On top are the teams of Kini and Sam, and Asha Daniels and Alexander Pope, working with the themes of light and dark and depth and shadows.

Playing with light and dark, Asha's breezy white mini and Alexander's gown.

I love Asha's white dress which is like a breath of fresh air, so clean and light looking. Once again I don't like Pope's gown. There's nothing new about the silhouette and it has a puffy, cheap-looking mesh overlay that looks cheap.

I also liked Dom Streater's sleek white dress with elaborate cutouts, though it is more about a fab dinner date than red carpet. She has had a low-key presence so far, but she won her season, so I wouldn't overlook her.

In the judging Alyssa says that Sam's look (that Kini created) is her favorite of all the designs she's ever seen on the "All Stars" runway. It must have really sucked to hear someone praised for his work, but if Sam did win for Kini's look, the TV audience would know Kini was cheated.

But it did not come to that moment because Asha and Alexander were named the winners. Kini's looks lost points when, standing still, the chiffon added layers to the look, which the singers said would add pounds to photos. Without model physiques, they said they couldn't take the risk of looking heavier when they often share the same red carpet as svelte stars such as Taylor Swift and Nicole Kidman.

Teams Stella/Valerie and Daniel/Mitchell end up on the bottom. Stella is saved by the strength of Valerie's jumpsuit. If they were on the bottom, Stella would have gone home for a slit that opened to her model's crotch.

So once again, Daniel and Mitchell are on the bottom and although I want to save my eyes from another week of looking at Mitchell's work, Daniel is sent home. I agreed with judge Georgina Chapman who said Daniel's gown could have been elegant if he had lined the skirt. The leather cut-out skirt was beautiful and even as is, I know some star, like Rihanna, would look great in it.

Daniel's look was much better than this photo indicates due to his slouchy model. In the background, Mitchell's "craft project."

Daniel's look was much better than this photo indicates due to his slouchy model. In the background, Mitchell's "craft project."

'Project Runway': Into the wind

By
February 19th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

Dancers from Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater provide the designers with inspiration for a challenge involving movement and flow.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5
Episode 2 recap: Let it Flow

The second episode of "Project Runway All Stars" opens with the designers heading to the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater studio.

I'm so excited about this challenge because I love movement in clothing, partly because I'm short so movement is important. I love the sophistication of structure too, but short people tend to disappear in a crowd and when clothes move, they catch the eye and force viewers to take notice and perhaps do a double-take.

At the studio, the dancers perform for them and the designers are instructed to keep their eyes on the fabric. They're told the forecast for the runway is "blustery wind," with a wind machine to enhance the billowy, ethereal quality of their designs.

Hawaii designer Kini Zamora selects bright yellow fabric and shows a sketch in vivid yellow and orange, giving a shout-out to Hawaii and the colors associated with the islands.

In a pre-season interview, Kini said all the designers got along but it doesn't look like Sam Donovan and Mitchell Perry are getting along because Sam made snarky, critical blog remarks about Mitchell's work during his season.

Kini Zamora works his magic on his yellow gown.

Mentor Zanna Roberts Rassi, senior fashion editor for Marie Claire magazine, comes in and during her critique of the designers' work, tells Kini she sees the "start of something glamorous," in his work. Meanwhile, Alexander Pope looks at Kini's gown and says, It looks like a yellow blob."

Rassi's last remark to the designers is that they're playing it too safe and that their garments look like normal apparel in the wind, instead of having been created for the wind.

When Kini finishes his gown, it looks beautiful but then he announces that he's going to dip-dye it and everybody, including me, is afraid for him because the garment is complete and there is no recovery from error. It's a big if as to whether the dye will turn out the way he wants it to and he knows it. He says that if he gets one spot of the orange dye on the field of yellow, "It's bye-bye Kini."

Kini's finished look, front and back.

Luckily, it turns out well, and Stella Zotis chalks up the final result to Kini's coming from Hawaii and being inspired by a tequila sunrise.

In the design room and on the runway the designers ooh and ah over Alexander Pope's cape, but it's paired with a tacky sheer dress with blue floral overlay. I have issues with the idea of a cape attached to a collar and random dress. Of course a chiffon cape is going to move in the breeze. Such a basic idea requires zero thought.

On the runway, Kini, is named as one of the top designers, along with Sam and Layana Aguilar. Judge Georgina Chapman praises the color and said that the ombre dye elevates the gown. Guest judge Vanessa Hudgens says he gave her a "total birds of paradise" moment. Judge Isaac Mizrahi doesn't like the gown's lace bodice and show host Alyssa Milano questions the black belt that cuts the gown in half.

I love Sam's dress, with movement built into the dress so that it doesn't require a wind machine to flow. Kini ends up safe, and Sam is declared the winner.

On the bottom are Alexander, Fäde Zu Grau, Emily Payne. I think Alexander should go home, but sadly it is Fäde who goes home. I think he's a talented designer, but flow is not his strong suit.

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Sam's finished look.

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Alexander's look.

This more structured dress got Fäde sent home, even though it's more tasteful than Alexander's ensemble.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Atelier Cologne fortune, fragrance

By
February 17th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Giselle Zelauy shows Atelier Cologne prizes that were available by selecting a winning fortune cookie.

Atelier Cologne launched its new Collection Orient with an "Orient Express" Lunar New Year celebration Feb. 13 at Neiman Marcus, complete with the romance of herb, spice and floral fragrances, fortune cookies and secrets revealed in tea leaves.

Atelier Cologne founders and creators Sylvie Ganter and Christophe Cervasel traveled to Asia and the Middle East to come up with five new Colognes Absolue inspired by the regions' beauty, people and customs, and precious raw materials.

I've always been a fan of the brand's fresh citrus scents and that of Silver Iris, but all of the new fragrances have a beautiful mystique. What maqkes it so confusing is that I always end up liking four fragrances and can't decide which I like most. But I've walked away wearing them and by the end of the afternoon, after experiencing all the notes as they emerge, it becomes apparent which I like best. Of these, I'm leaning toward imosa Indigo, though I'd like to try Poivre Electrique and Encens Jinhae again.

I've met Sylvie and Christophe many times and the couple revels in coming up with romantic stories for each fragrance. The stories often involve chance encounters between strangers who might connect in playful to clandestine ways.

Atelier Cologne's lineup of new fragrances.

The new scents in fresh white packaging, are:

Encens Jinhae: A floral woody fragrance featuring Jinhae cherry blossom, Samarkand incense and Sicilia lemon.

Philtre Ceylan: A woody citrus with black tea from Ceylan, bergamot from Calabria and green mint from India.

Poivre Electrique: A spicy woody fragrance with black pepper from Vietnam, bitter orange from Tunisia and incense from Samarkand.

Mimosa Indigo: A leather floral with mimosa indigo from India, mandarin orange from Italy and white leather accord.

Tobacco Nuit: A woody frarance featuring tobacco flower from Turkey, clementine from Italy and labdanum from Egypt

Also new is Bergamote Soleil: With bergamot from Calabria, jasmine from Egypt, lavender from Provence, cardamome from Guatemala andheart of vetiver from Haiti.

The tea leaves in my cup forecast a busy, worrisome April and summer of creativity.

True to the Orient Express theme of the event, patrons were able to enjoy a tea leaf reading as well as an opportunity to pick a lucky fortune cookie to win prizes from Atelier Cologne.

Although I have consulted mediums before, it was the first time I had a team meeting which spiritual intuitive medium Sarah Chamberlain described as a dying art form.

Europe had a history of tasseography, divination from spatters of wax, lead and other substances, which evolved into tea-leaf reading in the 17th century, after Dutch merchants introduced Chinese tea to Europe.

Chamberlain said her grandmother read coffee grounds and although her grandmother died when she was only 6, she later discovered she had a natural gift. I was intrigued by the way she was able to make sense of what you or I would see as a random scattering of tea leaves what she told me sounded like it could turn out to be fairly accurate. She indicated a stressful April which is a time that we will be launching something new at the newspaper and a time that I also plan to be traveling.

She was able to see birds, airplanes, guardian angels, dancers, stress and all these things through the end of the year. She also sees Big Ben at the end of the year, and I've really been wanting to go to London this year. I already know it's not happening in spring because I'm making other plans, but fall is a possbilitu. I'll revisit the reading at the end of the year to see how much comes true.

If you're interested in talking to her, she does readings at Sedona at Ward Centre. You can call the store for more details.

I love the stories that fuel the creation of the fragrances. I was drawn to this page because of the dream catcher imagery. I just made a dream catcher with a group of friends. This turned out to be one of my favorites, the cherry blossom fragrance with a story that reads: "The wind was blowing. The graceful petals of the cherry blossoms were dancing like snow flakes. Suddenly, she got closer to him and dove into jet black eyes. He thought that his spell started to take hold. Her beauty was unique. Despite feeling guilty, he kissed her."

I also love Atelier Cologne's refreshing citrus fragrances, including the newest, Bergamote Soleil.

Spiritual intuitive / medium Sarah Chamberlain reads tea leaves for an Atelier Cologne shopper.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Kini Zamora debuts on 'All-Stars'

By
February 12th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIMEThe designers learn what their challenge will be. Hawaii designer Kini Zamora is in the front row at right.

PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

The designers learn what their challenge will be. Hawaii designer Kini Zamora is in the front row at right.

 

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5

Episode 1: What Makes an All Star?

In the debut episode of "Project Runway All Stars," the competition opens with what amounts to a mini documentary of Hawaii designer Kini Zamora's story from "Project Runway's" Season 13.

The opening sequence reminded us of his capabilities, recapping his spectacular win on the rainway and American Girl competitions. I was reminded that I really wanted that American Girl outfit in red check, topped by a black-and-white Chanel-like coat in dress length. Stunning.

It also showed his teaming with Amanda Valentine for a challenge involving turning storage locker discards into a three-piece collection that included a dress made from deflated soccer balls.

He was also victorious in another challenge that had the designers trying to rework losing looks from contestants that had been booted out.

Designer Sam Donovan says that Kini is one of the three or four designers he feels is intimidating because "he can sew like a warlock," referring to his speed, and he calls Kini a genius.

After being reunited with some of the designers from his season—Emily Payne, Mitchell Perry and Fäde Zu Grau—and the other designers, show host Alyssa Milano arrived to say this would be the toughest competition ever and that there is no immunity in "All Stars."

Their challenge: Create a fashion forward look inspired by the moment in your life you knew you wanted to become a designer.

Based on my most recent interview with Kini a few weeks ago, I figured that moment came when he was still in grade school, working alongside his aunt Delilah Patoc.

Sure enough, he talked about the moment at age 10 when he created a sketch and his aunt helped him to sew it into reality, an eye-opening, wow moment for the budding designer.

I never thought of designers as being in a dangerous profession, but the first OMG moment arrives when Daniel Franco—the first to go home in "Project Runway's" inaugural season, and fourth to go home in Season 2—slices off the top of his finger with a pair of scissors.

After that, there's not much mystery as to who might go home. Daniel's ragged suit dress and Mitchell's uncohesive pieced-together Franken-frock look like they're destined for the bottom two.

On the runway, Kini is safely in the middle of the pack for his creation, a black-and-white dress with fitted bodice, collar details and a full skirt.

Valerie Mayen is declared the winner for a top with a lattice pattern of sherbet colors, paired with flirty black-and-white shorts.

Daniel and Mitchell do end up on the bottom, but surprise! The judges tells them they still don't know who they are as designers, allowing both to stay another week.

Stay tuned. I will be recapping Kini's journey each week after each new "Project Runway All Stars" episode airs.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage appears in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Happy New Year from Qeelin

By
February 8th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY QEELIN A model wears pieces from Qeelin's Wulu collection, which put the brand on the map when Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung wore the designs to the Cannes Film Festival in 2007.

PHOTOS COURTESY QEELIN

A model wears pieces from Qeelin's Wulu collection, which put the brand on the map when Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung wore the designs to the Cannes Film Festival in 2007. The collection was inspired by the bottle gourd with lines that echo the curves of the auspicious No. 8. With its hard shell, these bottles have been used to carry medicine, wine and “magic.” They were also tied to the backs of children and boat people to serve as life preservers.

The nature of my work, being so far from other major cities, is that I sometimes must write about things I haven't had an opportunity to examine firsthand. Such was the case of writing about Qeelin, a brand conceived by Hong Kong designer Dennis Chan after he found inspiration while on a 1997 trip to Dunhuang’s Mogao Caves in northwestern Gansu Province, which had been a major stop on the ancient Silk Road.

In photographs, the jewelry managed to be sophisticated, charming and whimsical takes on Chinese symbols and mythology, but photographs didn't prepare me for the ingenuity of the pieces, with their moving parts and engineering. In addition to the pure visual joy of seeing an adorable necklace featuring a panda set adrift via pink balloon, I was captivated by a necklace in the shape of a diamond cloud-encrusted snuff bottle that was also a kaleidoscope. Peer into the bottle opening and the colors of gemstones take on different shapes as the bottle shifts.

I guess it should have figured, given Chan's background in industrial design. He said that until he reached those caves, he had little interest in jewelry. Today, he considers it a great challenge to create art within such a small framework.

He had been schooled in industrial design and marketing, and was making a living as a design consultant for companies ranging from automobile manufacturers to tech giant Panasonic, but nine years of seeing others’ success with his ideas left him with a hunger to create his own brand.

What that would be, he didn’t know, until he reached those caves.

Happy New Year! The Xi Xi collection is represented by the Chinese lion and the lion dance, signifying celebration and joy, with a mouth that opens and closes. This particular design is from Qeelin's couture collection, and only three exist. In 18K white gold with full pave diamonds, rubies and onyx.

Happy New Year! The Xi Xi collection is represented by the Chinese lion and the lion dance, signifying celebration and joy, with a mouth that opens and closes. This particular design is from Qeelin's couture collection, and only three exist. In 18K white gold with full pave diamonds, rubies and onyx; $123,000.

“Fifteen-hundred years ago, it was the crossroad of all trade with the West opening to the East. It was a stopover, a melting pot, and because travel was dangerous they built caves, sanctuaries that they filled with temples and artwork,” Chan said, during a phone interview from his home in Hong Kong. “Because the desert is so dry, the murals are so well-preserved and they really fascinated me. You could see how people were dressed, their hairstyles, fashion and jewelry. Here, we had this really amazing history, but I felt like no one was taking care of it.”

There, he had an epiphany that he would be the one to take China’s story to the West through jewelry, and Qeelin was born. The name is a Westernized spelling of “qilin” or “kirin,” a mythical fiery and fearsome-looking creature representative of prosperity, success and protection.

Chan introduced his first pieces in 2004, and among fans of the brand was Hong Kong actress Maggie Cheung. In February 2007, Cheung was headed to the Cannes Film Festival and asked Chan if she could wear his jewelry on the red carpet. She had been nominated for a Palme d’Or Best Actress award for her role in “Clean,” also starring Nick Nolte.

The Bo Bo collection featues the panda, a Chinese symbol of innocence and peace, which has been reimagined as a Teddy bear with articulated limbs. This karge classic Bo Bo pendant is in 18K white gold with diamonds and black diamonds.

The Bo Bo collection featues the panda, a Chinese symbol of innocence and peace, which has been reimagined as a Teddy bear with articulated limbs. This karge classic Bo Bo pendant is in 18K white gold with diamonds and black diamonds.

When Cheung became the first Asian woman to win a Palme d’Or—for her role as a woman whose life goes into a tailspin after she is wrongfully accused of heroin possession—it not only changed her life, but Chan’s as well.

“It was very lucky. The next day everybody was talking about her dress, her jewelry, and overnight my products became famous.”

Chan leveraged that publicity by choosing to open the first Qeelin boutique in Paris at Jardin du Palais Royal later that year. There are now 25 Qeelin boutiques worldwide, but only recently has the brand begun to move into the United States.

Timed to the beginning of the Year of the Monkey, Qeelin launched at Neiman Marcus Ala Moana and pieces can be viewed in the Precious Jewels Salon, Level One. In the United States, prices start at about $415 for a pair of Wulu cufflinks or $810 for a petite Wulu bracelet in 18K rose gold.

PHOTO BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comThis Bo Bo comes with its own wardrobe which can be switched up with the help of a "magic" magnetic wand.

PHOTO BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

This Bo Bo comes with its own wardrobe which can be switched up with the help of a "magic" magnetic wand.

The growth of the brand coincides with China’s growing world presence and cultural pride.

“I spent one-fourth of my life in Europe, where I loved window shopping. I found that luxury stores were not really about products but a story and a history. It’s something we weren’t doing in China,” Chan said.

“When most people talk about Chinese style, they talk about antiques. China has a reputation of doing a lot of copying and being the workshop of the world. But that story is evolving. It’s the same way people were talking about Japan after World War II. Even Korea. Before, nobody wanted to drive Korean cars. Now, they’re everywhere.

“Living in a country, you don’t think much about your own culture, but when you travel, you look back and have more respect for your own heritage.”

For the Chinese New Year, Qeelin's Lucky 12 app will give you a Chinese zodiac reading and suggest lucky items you can wear (from the Qeelin collection of course), to enhance luck, wealth, career or relationships, or mitigate the energy of unlucky stars in your chart.

For the Chinese New Year, Qeelin's Lucky 12 app will give you a Chinese zodiac reading and suggest lucky items you can wear (from the Qeelin collection of course), to enhance luck, wealth, career or relationships, or mitigate the energy of unlucky stars in your chart.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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LeSportsac reveals its new look

By
February 5th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comPosters at LeSportsac stores emphasize the new light-as-air material being used in the brand's new bag collections.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Posters at LeSportsac stores emphasize the new light-as-air material being used in the brand's new bag collections.

LeSportsac stores are getting a new look, and its Waikiki Shopping Plaza store was only the second in the nation—the first was Soho, NYC—to roll out the streamlined, sportier aesthetic.

Honolulu media was invited to take a look Jan. 29 during a reception that welcomed LeSportsac VP, Global Creative Director D'Arcy Jensen and Senior Director, Global Marketing Berly Isaak, who were heading back to New York later that evening in advance of the introduction of a LeSportsac pop-up shop at Lord & Taylor.

The event also introduced the brand's latest handbags, totes, backpacks, crossbodys and traveler's duffels made from its new packable, tissue-weight Nylon, the same fabric being used in contemporary apparel by such luxury brands as Moncler.

"We're going back to our roots and the things important to the brand and our customers," Jensen said.

LeSportsac VP, Global Creative Director D'Arcy Jensen, left, and Senior Director, Global Marketing Berly Isaak, were in town for a week in advance of the LeSportsac Waikiki Shopping Plaza store reveal.

LeSportsac VP, Global Creative Director D'Arcy Jensen, left, and Senior Director, Global Marketing Berly Isaak, were in town for a week in advance of the LeSportsac Waikiki Shopping Plaza store reveal.

The brand launched 42 years ago with traveler-friendly, lightweight handbags and duffels, and the stores' redesign is in keeping with a global athleisure trend aimed toward smart, stylish leisure living.

I'm all for the new featherweight gear coz I'm a lightweight when it comes to heavy lifting, and there's nothing worse than struggling with heavy bags while traveling. It's bad enough that I'm short and often travel solo, meaning that I often depend on the kindness of strangers to help me with loading my carryon into airline overhead compartments.

Other innovations in designs include making the switch from plastic hardware to coated aluminum used on iPhones for a sleeker industrial look. They've added more webbing to support the lighter weight material, and more color has been added inside the bag via printed pockets.

"We're being more innovative because everyone's knocking us off," said director of sales Cindy Eastman.

Response has been positive, and the stores' new look will be making its way across the country, and there were hints of wearable fashion to come.

The Waikiki Shopping Plaza LeSportsac store is only the second in the nation to roll out the brand's sportier, modern look.

The Waikiki Shopping Plaza LeSportsac store is only the second in the nation to roll out the brand's sportier, modern look.

lesport store

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

'Sporty' spring at Bloomingdale's

By
February 4th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comMiss Hawaii USA 2016 Chelsea Hardin was among the models during the Bloomingdale's "Welcome to Fashion Paradise" in-store runway show that took place Jan. 30.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Miss Hawaii USA 2016 Chelsea Hardin was among the models during the Bloomingdale's "Welcome to Fashion Paradise" in-store runway show that took place Jan. 30. She is wearing a Milly trapeze dress ($795) with Kate Spade large "Flynn" handbag ($298).

Me and anything sports-related don't mix, and if anyone asks me any questions about the Super Bowl or recent Pro Bowl events in town, I just have to respond, "Huh?"

I generally run from anything sport-related, but a Jan. 30 "Welcome to Fashion Paradise" runway show at Bloomingdale's offered a glimpse of that rarified world as members of the NFL Players Association filled seats to take in the newly arrived Spring-Summer 2016 collections.

The NFL Players Association was formed to help the players and their families in all aspects of their lives, from collective bargaining to dealing with sudden fame, making travel arrangements and finding financial advisors and agents.

Travel managers help to coordinate events for wives, girlfriends, moms and other friends and family members traveling with the players to various cities, and the fashion show was one of the events on the agenda during the Pro Bowl.

The women proved to be just as entertaining as the show itself, bringing new meaning to the idea of sporty fashion. The show's four segments were devoted to island-inspired casual wear, the season's whites and color collections, and a "Hot Hawaii Nights" segment timed for Valentine's Day date nights.

In the audience were members of the NFL Players Association in town for the Pro Bowl, including left, Nikki and Taylor Jordan, wife and son of New Orleans Saints defensive end Cameron Jordan, and Steffanie Jordan, Cameron's sister.

In the audience were members of the NFL Players Association in town for the Pro Bowl, including left, Nikki and Taylor Jordan, wife and son of New Orleans Saints defensive end Cameron Jordan, and Steffanie Jordan, Cameron's sister.

Vanessa is wearing a Mara Hoffman one-piece swimsuit ($230), with Figue handbag ($425) and August Hat Co. wide-brim hat ($70).

Vanessa is wearing a Mara Hoffman one-piece swimsuit ($230), with Figue handbag ($425) and August Hat Co. wide-brim hat ($70).

Daniela Abe on the runway in a RED Valentino steel-gray sparkle dress ($1,195) that was part of the "Hot Hawaii Nights" segment.

Daniela Abe on the runway in a RED Valentino steel-gray sparkle dress ($1,195) that was part of the "Hot Hawaii Nights" segment.

A selfie moment before the start of the show.

A selfie moment before the start of the show.

More looks courtesy Bloomingdale's:

PHOTOS BY MARCO GARCIA / courtesy bloomingdale'sChelsea wears a La Perla mesh hoodie ($894) worn over a black-and-white one-piece swimsuit ($354) and white slacks.

PHOTOS BY MARCO GARCIA / courtesy bloomingdale's

Chelsea wears a La Perla mesh hoodie ($894) worn over a black-and-white one-piece swimsuit ($354) and white slacks.

Chevis in a DVF navy Fleurett midnight dress ($368) with Ted Baker flower starburst necklace ($129).

Chevis in a DVF navy Fleurett midnight dress ($368) with Ted Baker flower starburst necklace ($129).

Bruna wears a Max Mara blush sheet dress ($975), with matching overcoat ($2,690).

Bruna wears a Max Mara blush sheet dress ($975), with matching overcoat ($2,690).

Ryley Colle in The Kooples dress shirt and suit.

Ryley Colle in The Kooples dress shirt and suit.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage is in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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