Archive for March, 2016

Kini watch: No fairy tale ending

By
March 31st, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

The designers receive their assignment on the latest episode of "Project Runway All Stars."

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5
Episode 8 recap: "Once Upon a Runway"

At New York's Drama Book Shop, the designers meet up with host Alyssa Milano and Laura Michelle Kelly, star of the theater production, "Finding Neverland."

They are assigned to design for various fictional heroines from children's stories, using the character's back story to bring her to life in a modern runway look.

Hawaii designer Kini Zamora said he's always wanted to design for a modern fairy tale, so he said hearing the challenge is like a dream come true. He's assigned "Alice in Wonderland" and opts to use denim, with a couture denim ruffle in back, a look fit for a fantasy tea party, and adorable in execution.

Kini's modern take on "Alice in Wonderland" heading to a tea party.

With a background in costume, Alexander Pope would seem to have an advantage in the competition. He's assigned one of the easiest characters to dress to impress, Cinderella. But instead of being creative, he comes up with what is essentially a boring bridesmaid dress.

Things heat up while the designers are in the lunchroom, when Ken Laurence points out there could be only six designers left instead of eight, because there have been two saves during the season.

It's a sore point with Kini because he created a top during the season's only team challenge, that kept Sam Donovan in the competition, and the two get into a tiff.

Sam's updated "Little Mermaid" ensemble.

Sam is making a mesh crop top and pencil skirt for "The Little Mermaid," with applique patches of blue and shimmery sequins reflecting the sea. Alexander reminds Kini that it's the same sort of junior look that got Stella Zotis eliminated from the competition.

Sure enough, Kini ends up in the top three with Dom Streater and Asha Daniels, and Sam ends up on the bottom with Alexander and Layana Aguilar.

I'm certain the win will be between Kini and Dom. I love Dom's idea of a Tinker Bell straight off Carnaby Street. Hers is a garment I might not notice on a rack, but it looks fabulous on her model, with bold prints and cut-out negative space "wings."

I'm shocked when Asha wins. Her jumpsuit with tail design is borderline old lady, Eastern European tacky, on par with Alexander's gown.

As for the bottom, it's a toss-up. Layana's look reads more ready-to-wear than designer. Alexander's look is old, and Sam's is too simple. But I'm feeling the judges had to keep Sam, because the Kini-Sam rivalry is the only interesting storyline of the season. So, no fairy tale ending for Kini.

Layana has been on the bottom several times, so she seems like the one to go home, but in the end, going too "old lady" is the worst offense for a designer, and Alexander is sent home.

I didn't care for Asha's winning design, which looks old and tacky.

The old lady gown that got Alexander sent home.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Magnolia White & Galia Lahav

By
March 29th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY MAGNOLIA WHITE

Designs by Galia Lahav were introduced during a Magnolia White couture bridal fashion show that took place March 25 at 53 by the Sea.

Magnolia White, a couture bridal salon, will open its doors April 1, and celebrated in style with a preview fashion show of designs by Galia Lahav at 53 by the Sea.

The fashion show took place March 25, with a red carpet welcome for guests, followed by the fashion show that had models walking through the doors of the palatial restaurant, and ascending its marble staircase.

Following the show, guests sat down to a four-course dinner, showcasing the restaurant as a venue for a full spectrum of special events. Themed to weddings, courses represented "Something Refreshing" (salad with heart of palm "lace" and citrus vinaigrette), "Something Savory" (roast chicken), "Something Rich" (Kona lobster) and "Something Sweet" (dessert).

A Galia Lahav design showcased inside the Magnolia White couture bridal salon. The designer is known for her dramatic illusion backless gowns.

Magnolia White launched in 2015 in Omotesando, Tokyo, and features couture gowns by designers in New York, London and Paris.

The Honolulu bridal salon is the exclusive Hawaii retailer for Galia Lahav, and will also feature collections by David Fielden, Rue de Seine and Delphine Manivet, with accessories from Emmy London and Paris by Debra. Designs range from simple gowns fit for a destination wedding, to the romantic, to the elaborate work of Galia Lahav, known for her illusion backs, cascading silk tulle skirts and use of Italian ivory lace.
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Magnolia White is on the ground level of the Hokua Tower, 1288 Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 106. Call (808) 800-3088. The boutique will be open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays, and Saturdays and Sundays by appointment. Online: www.magnolia-white.com.

A model in Galia Lahav at 53 by the Sea.

Galia Lahav is also known for its use of Italian lace.

Stunning tulle skirts also made impression as models entered the room and ascended the 53 by the Sea staircase.

A glamorous full skirt.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

The fashion show dinner opened with a salad of Waipoli Farm greens, Nalo Farm micro greens, Big Island grapefruit and fennel, with toasted macadamia nuts, blanketed by hearts of palm "lace," and drizzled with citrus vinaigrette.

J

J. Ludovico Farm roast chicken was draped with red beet consomme jelly and served with Sumida Farm watercress puree, roasted Ho Farm tomatoes and braised green papaya seasoned with sansho chili.

The main course comprised steamed Kona lobster and sautéed Kona abalone cooked with Naked Cow truffle butter sauce, Big Island kabocha puree, with an Aloha Tofu soy milk emulsion, and served with grilled onions, green beans and Hamakua Ali'i mushrooms.

Dinner concluded with "Something Sweet" in the form of lilikoi mousse and jasmine-infused jelly with Hawaiian salted caramel sauce, Kona coffee cookie and an assortment of seasonal fruit.

On the Shop A Le'a spring runway

By
March 25th, 2016



Backstage with DVF boutique manager Marilee Mattson, center, and her platinum-haired models.

Here's a look at DVF and Bloomingdale's designs that were on the runway when Ala Moana Center presented its spring fashion event, Shop A Le'a, March 14 through 20. These shows took place on March 19.

Kini watch: Trading fabric, barbs

By
March 25th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

Kini Zamora plots out his design.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5
Episode 7 recap: "Bait and Stitch"

Every week, the designers get their assignments before heading off to Mood to make their fabric selections. This week, they start at Mood so they know some twist is in play.

Host Alyssa Milano meets them and reminds them that they've been chided for poor fabric choices, so this week, producers have taken the fabric choice out of their hands. The designers pick envelopes that contain the type of fabric they must use to create an evening resort look.

Some of the choices are unusual for the task such as neoprene, and Hawaii designer Kini Zamora being assigned brocade to create a resort look.

When they arrive at the workroom, Alyssa is already waiting for them, so they know something bad is about to happen. They are told that they must switch fabric with another designer and none of them is happy. After all the selections are made, Kini and Sam Donovan are the only ones left to swap fabric and neither is happy.

Kini's dress, made with Sam Donovan's lace, has kept him in the competition for another week.

Of the two, Sam has the better deal because he hasn't given Kini much fabric to work with, the lace is sheer and there's nothing to build under it. In trading barbs, Kini says, "I can't hide the hideous." Sam's lace does look very cheap and when Kini voices his grievances to mentor Zanna Roberts Rossi, she tells him not to make excuses, "figure it out."

Kini manages to come up with a cocktail look and ends up safely in the middle.

Sam is named to the Top 3 for a dress that, in spite of the weight of brocade, appears to flow. Dom Streater is named the winner for a linen ensemble that included a beach towel-style stripe pattern that she pieced together with strips of blue and yellow fabric.

And Valerie Mayen is sent home for a jumpsuit with tacky porno-costume bodice.

Interesting how there have been so many jumpsuits on the runway this season, as well as turbans.

Sam's look created with Kini's brocade.

Dom's winning linen creation.

The walking "Creamsicle" jumpsuit that sent Valerie home.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Macy's hosts spring glam event

By
March 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Brigitte Patton modeled spring whites during informal modeling showcasing spring's trends at Macy's.

Macy's presented a "Get Glam & Get Going" spring party March 12, with host Crystal Pancipanci sharing the season's style trends, with informal modeling, refreshments, free lei for shoppers and a photobooth for fun snaps.

Among trends featured were white lace, matched sets, gingham, pops of color, graphic prints, red, and denim on denim.

Here's a look:

 Miss Hawaii USA 2016 Chelsea Hardin modeled a Michael by Michael Kors gingham check dress.

Miss Hawaii USA 2016 Chelsea Hardin modeled a Michael by Michael Kors gingham check dress.

Hardin in bold print.

Crystal Pancipanci shows jewelry and accessories for the season.

During the celebration of spring, shoppers could help themselves to lei provided by Cindy['s Lei Shoppe.

Shoppers were able to pose for photobooth snaps during the event.

Shoppers were able to pose for photobooth snaps during the event.

macys photobooth

Among those stopping by that day was MAIA Couture's Rupal Gohil, with her blue-eyed accessory.

NM Sogetsu show heralds spring

By
March 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A shopper stops for a closer look at one of the Sogetsu ikebana arrangements that were on view at Neiman Marcus.

On the anniversary of 3/11, the tragedy of the Japan earthquake and tsunami, a display of Sogetsu ikebana flower arrangements served as a symbol of man's resilience in the wake of disaster.

It was also nice to see flowers in bloom prior to the first day of spring, March 20.

The three-day "Art of Flowers ... Now" celebration of spring, art, fashion and flowers, took place at Neiman Marcus, which Sensei Linda Hamasaki and her 40 students of Sogetsu School of Ikebana, dressed with their dramatic creations March 11 through 13.

In a tie-in to the retailers' fashion, many of the Japanese-style arrangements featuring red, the color of the season. Arrangements incorporated local tropical plants, seasonal flowers and some spring flowers flown in from Japan.

Hamasaki, who has been practicing Sogetsu ikebana for more than 20 years, said that's not very long in terms that learning is a never-ending journey.

She said that the Sogetsu School stresses movement that expresses the energy of the living materials. It's the students' task to understand their plant materials and bring out their best.

She said that given the same materials and same lessons, each student will come out with something different.

"With any kind of artform, you're working with color, harmony and movement, but when you're working with living materials, you can't force it to do what you want, you have to adapt to it," she said.

Here's a look:

The artists posed for a photo during the opening of the exhibition.

Instructor Linda Hamasaki, with some of her students' work in the background.

Joyce “Seika” Tomonari created a towering display, including a base of metal that resembled branches.

A creation by Dorothy "Seien" Nitta and Barb Matsumoto was on view in the Shoe Salon.

A manikin peers from behind a protea arrangement by Tracie Iha and Joanne Chang.

An arrangement of  nanohana flowers imported from Japan.

An arrangement of nanohana flowers imported from Japan.

Even a "3 Stones" art installation was festooned by Shevaun Low.

Sheets of pink and red plastic were cut and manipulated with heat to accompany an ikebana anthurium arrangement by Joyce "Seika" Tomonari in the Jonathan Adler shop.

Wirebag accessory or jewelry?

By
March 22nd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Sascha Koki shows Anteprima/Wirebag's new three-dimensional Year of the Monkey backpack, designed to hold on to the wearer and keep small belongings tucked into its tummy. This one is $779.

Anteprima/Wirebag will be launching part of its Spring/Summer 2016 collections tomorrow, with styles ranging from playful to luxe.

Among designs to be introduced is Anteprima's "999" collection of hand-knitted wirebags using a blend of 99.9 percent pure silver and the brand's signature wire yarn, with 18K rose gold plate logo rings. Prices of the silver bags range from $430 to $907.

On the more playful side are a duo of "Monkey"-shaped backpacks ($425 and $779), and the "Cactus" collection, a trio of crossbody, wristlet and handle bags in the shapes of barrel and seguaro cacti, and rectangle dotted with fluffy areoles and beaded bristles. Prices range from $276 to $648.

The new selections include about 22 designs exclusive to the Hawaii market.

Shoppers who purchase $480 or more from the boutique will receive an Anteprima X Hawaiian drip coffee gift, while supplies last.

Anteprima/Wirebag is in the Royal Hawaiian Center, Building B, ground level. Call 924-0808.

A smaller monkey ($425), in orogento color, holds on to a purse rack.

A jeweled floral key ring dangles from one of Anteprima's new wire glitter bags for the spring/summer season.

PHOTOS COURTESY ANTEPRIMA/WIREBAG

Anteprima's Latte Metallico Cactus bag, $648.

This handbag is from Anteprima's Glitter Miscuglio collection.

This handbag is from Anteprima's Glitter Miscuglio collection.

Kini watch: Going for Baroque

By
March 20th, 2016



PHOTOS COURTESY LIFETIME

Kini Zamora's still in the "All Stars" game in Week 6.

'PROJECT RUNWAY' ALL STARS SEASON 5
Episode 6 recap: "Going for Baroque"

I miss the screening of project runway All-Stars last week Thursday while I was on Maui I reached home at 11 PM and promptly crashed after running around all day from Kahului to Makawao to Paia.

The next day I also had to find out if Kini had won before writing about his grand opening at the Clique by KZ.

After reading a recap I remembered this was the week that they were to go back in time to the Baroque era. Commenters were dissing the designers for not knowing the details of the Baroque period, and producers for bringing the designers to a medieval event, which had a style preceding the more ornamented Baroque era.

When I actually watch the episode host Melissa Milano actually talked about the medieval. Eating into the Baroque so it just goes to show you how commenters always go off tangent and really don't pay attention to what is being said.

The funny thing is that they're giving only two days to create a Baroque piece when the elaborate garments we now associate with Baroque garments took months to create. Milano tells the designers, "For one of you it will be off with your head." Lucky for the designers that in today's reality show duels, it just means getting booted off.

This is Baroque style, 1590 to 1725:

In Caspar Netscher's 17th century painting, Susanna Huygens wore a Baroque white satin dress with paned sleeves.

Spanish painter Diego Velázquez's 17th century painting "Las Meninas (The Maids of Honour" provides a classic example of Baroque style.

In another example of the Baroque, artist Peter Paul Rubens' 17th century portrait of Susanna Fourment shows an open high-necked chemise, red sleeves tied on with ribbon points, and a broad-brimmed hat with plumes.

I love a challenge like this because it also gives me a chance to learn more about costume beyond the 19th to 21st centuries. Recalling my interview with Harold Koda, former curator in charge of the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institution, he said that when he first entered the field he had general knowledge of period dress, but had to learn to differentiate between details of a 1750 sleeve vs. a 1760 sleeve. Think about future clothing historians trying to determine a 1950 dress from a 1950 replica dress made in 2016. To start, you look at details of fabric and construction that was more exacting in the past.

Baroque style started around 1600 in Rome and spread throughout Europe. It started with simplification, eliminating the Elizabethan ruff in favor of broad lace or linen collars. Waistlines rose for both men and women. Sleeves became full and were often paned or slashed to show the voluminous sleeves of the shirt or chemise beneath.

Later in the period, the body was tightly corseted, with a low, broad neckline and dropped shoulder. In later decades, the overskirt was drawn back and pinned up to display the petticoat, which was heavily decorated, leading into the late Baroque, or Rococo, period that we associate with the extravagance and excess of the French royal court beginning with Louis XV.

Everyone is anti-Sam Donovan this week. He chooses a beautiful lace fabric and Mitchell Perry says that doesn't make a good designer when the fabric is doing all the work. Well, fabric choice is one of a good designer's top considerations. His lace gown is beautiful, but it looks like another contemporary, halter top dress. The other designers are peeved that once again, he doesn't give credit to another designer who helped him with the idea and placement of lace cut-out flowers. This time it's Dom Streater who goes uncredited, like Hawaii designer Kini Zamora before her.

Meanwhile, Kini opts for a fitted red gown with gold-embroidered applique details and a skirt that in his illustration looks a lot like that of his famous "Rainway" dress from the original "Project Runway" Season 13. In execution, it turns out more like accordion details. For this, he ends up safely in the middle of the pack.

Online, Kini critics online didn't like seeing what they consider to be a repeat of his umbrella dress.

For the first time, I really like one of Layana Aguilar's creations, a sort of Spanish matador interpretation of the Baroque, in what starts out with a short dress. Because the challenge is to create a gown, she scrambles to create a skirt, and I really like the movement of the skirt in contrast to the severe bodice. The judges hate the colors of yellow and what they call brown, but on my TV screen appears as a mauve. They also think there's too many ideas in the top, but hello, this is a couture challenge.She said she worked with couture techniques while working for Oscar de la Renta, and I think it shows.

This is the first time Ken Laurence claims a win for an elegant sheath with capelike sleeves. It looks more like a medieval-inspired garment rather than Baroque, but it is stunning.

And Mitchell Perry goes home for disaster of a short-long dress.

Ken Laurence was deemed the winner for this contemporary expression of a medieval cloak.

This is Medieval style, 5th to 15th centuries:

Think of your typical Renaissance Faire garb. Women's fashion of the early Middle Ages was influenced by classical Greek and Roman clothing, and consisted of two tunics under a long cloak that likely protected the tunics from the grime of their daily lives. People didn't own many clothes so had to preserve what they had.

Tunics and robes became more ornate in the late medieval period.

This is Rococo, also considered late Baroque, 18th century:

Think Marie Antoinette in her most ornate court dress worn over wide panniers.

Going back into this history reminded me of the work of another local designer, Eric Chandler, who has since semi-retired to Washington state. He created many an elaborate late Baroque-style ball gown, this one modeled by Emma Wo in 2008.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her coverage in print on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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