Archive for the ‘Accessories’ Category

Living culture at the MAMo Wearable Arts Show 2016

May 24th, 2016
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VIDEO CAPTURES AND PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

One of Maui designer Anna Kahalekulu's models holds up a life-sustaining pohaku, or stone, the inspiration for her collection for the 10th annual MAMo Wearable Art Show.

Storyteller/performer Moses Goods opened the Maoli Arts Month 10th annual Wearable Art Show on May 18 at Hawaii Theatre with his tale of Maui "making plants fly" by shaping them into a lupe, or kite, reflecting the ingenuity of the demigod and the Hawaiian people, who, from humble materials, were able to create, clothe, house and feed themselves.

It was a tale befitting the show dedicated to showcasing the creativity of Native Hawaiian and Pacific designers, artists and cultural practitioners.

The show is one of the highlight events of a month that includes a film festival, storytelling festival and art exhibition.

With the click of 'ili 'ili and pahu rhythms with the speed of a heartbeat, Maui-based designer and educator Anna Kahalekulu, a first-timer to the Oahu show, was the first to present. Her show was focused on the pohaku, or stones considered to be one of the people's life-sustaining forces.

Her fabrics dyed with plant materials and alaea reflected the multi-colors and textures of stones from mountain to sea.

In addition to the work shown on stage, fashion student Rava Ray showed pieces, in the Hawaii Theatre lobby, that she created for school projects at Parsons The New School for Design, including this piece incorporating turkey and peacock feathers.

The show was tamer than last year's event, when many an artist made a political statement regarding the building of the Thirty Meter Telescope atop Mauna Kea.

The show featured the return of Lufi Luteru, Wahine Toa, Maile Andrade and Marques Marzan. Maori designer Hone Bailey was there representing Aotearoa, or New Zealand.

With co-host and show director Robert Uluwehi Cazimero feeling under the weather, there wasn't as much of the comedic banter between him and producer emcee Vicky Holt Takamine as usual, but enough to add lightness and laughter to the evening.

A hair look created for 6th generation weaver Keaou Nelson's show of handwoven accessories.

Unfortunately, maybe I was laughing a little too hard regarding their tale of a missing connection at the airport due to confusion over Kauai designer Lavena Kehaulani Kekua's full name, which hadn't been included on the ticket.

Adding a double whammy to her day, I must have hit the stop button on my video camera, so her show isn't included as one of the videos below. It was a beautiful show of bold, handpainted scarves. All I can say is, "Sorry" and "Come back next year!"

And the same goes for the audience. Even at its most sedate, this is still one of the most lively shows in town.

Following the show, there was an after-party and trunk show where some girl snagged Kahalekulu's sleeveless yellow silk jacket I wanted.

And, as a testament to Wahine Toa's and designer Nita Pilago's popularity, there was a line at a private entrance for her work.

Another show will take place June 25 at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center. Call (808) 242-2787 for more information. Featured will be the work of Maile Andrade, Marques Marzan, Wahine Toa, Koa Johnson, Anna Kahalekulu, Elisha Clemons and Kehau Kekua.

Are designers ever done before showtime? Above, Marques Marzan adds black trim to one of his garments. Below left, Anna Kahalekulu works on a lauhala capelet, and Keoua Nelson works on one of his woven belts.

mamo anna

mamo nelson

Marzan's inspiration was the chiefly fan, the pe'ahi, that incorporated weaving and twining techniques, and often, human hair from a close relative or someone imbued with strong mana.

Here are the shows, in order of presentation:

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Wirebag accessory or jewelry?

March 22nd, 2016
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PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Sascha Koki shows Anteprima/Wirebag's new three-dimensional Year of the Monkey backpack, designed to hold on to the wearer and keep small belongings tucked into its tummy. This one is $779.

Anteprima/Wirebag will be launching part of its Spring/Summer 2016 collections tomorrow, with styles ranging from playful to luxe.

Among designs to be introduced is Anteprima's "999" collection of hand-knitted wirebags using a blend of 99.9 percent pure silver and the brand's signature wire yarn, with 18K rose gold plate logo rings. Prices of the silver bags range from $430 to $907.

On the more playful side are a duo of "Monkey"-shaped backpacks ($425 and $779), and the "Cactus" collection, a trio of crossbody, wristlet and handle bags in the shapes of barrel and seguaro cacti, and rectangle dotted with fluffy areoles and beaded bristles. Prices range from $276 to $648.

The new selections include about 22 designs exclusive to the Hawaii market.

Shoppers who purchase $480 or more from the boutique will receive an Anteprima X Hawaiian drip coffee gift, while supplies last.

Anteprima/Wirebag is in the Royal Hawaiian Center, Building B, ground level. Call 924-0808.

A smaller monkey ($425), in orogento color, holds on to a purse rack.

A jeweled floral key ring dangles from one of Anteprima's new wire glitter bags for the spring/summer season.

PHOTOS COURTESY ANTEPRIMA/WIREBAG

Anteprima's Latte Metallico Cactus bag, $648.

This handbag is from Anteprima's Glitter Miscuglio collection.

This handbag is from Anteprima's Glitter Miscuglio collection.

POSHd opens its doors at Ward

March 8th, 2016
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PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Valerie Ragaza-Miao at the entrance to her new shop, POSH'd by Valerie Joseph, at Ward Village Shops, next to Bed Bath & Beyond.

Valerie Ragaza-Miao, founder of the Valerie Joseph boutique, celebrated Girl's Day March 3 with the grand opening of her new boutique concept at Ward Village, POSHd by Valerie Joseph.

"I consider it the older, socially conscious sister of Valerie Joseph," she said. "I've always been a big supporter of community and always wanted to expand awareness of socially conscious brands."

Beyond her visibility as a boutique owner, Ragaza-Miao has been a longtime supporter of community organizations such as Community Helping Schools, raising funds through her annual PINC (Partners Inspiring Nouvelle Concepts) events, and also staging events to boost girls' and womens' self-esteem.

Ragaza-Miao, whose motto has long been, "Life is short, buy cute clothes," still delivers the cuteness at her new boutique, but now features more garments sourced from microbusinesses that help support women in impoverished countries.

Valerie 's husband Joseph Miao, with the couple's toy poodle Sukoshi, who gives Bellini restaurant's Maile  Sengoura a kiss. Maile catered the event.

Valerie 's husband Joseph Miao, with the couple's toy poodle Sukoshi, who gives Bellini restaurant's Maile Sengoura a kiss. Maile was serving up burger sliders for the event.

Among jewelry items are Greenie Bracelets that come wrapped around handmade, recycled paper embedded with seeds, allowing purchasers to plant trees with each purchase.

Ragaza-Miao also carries note-filled tins from Gratitude, a company that enlists artists to create products to promote social responsibility and help raise funds for education in at-risk populations. Each note bears a message to leave behind to brighten someone's day.

Also part of the lifestyle boutique are small home decor such as pillows, and Ragaza-Miao's Coco Java line of Hawaiian coffee, at $7.99 for 7 ounces, and gluten-free, candy sprinkle "confetti" studded coconut-flavored Hawaiian pancake mix ($9.99).

The boutique is next to Bed Bath & Beyond. For more information, call 942-5258 or visit POSHdHawaii.com.

Malie Moran, left, and Midweek style editor Yu Shing Ting in POSHd apparel.

Pastry chef Eddie Lopez was serving up pancakes made from Valerie's Coco Java gluten-free "Coconut Confetti" pancake mix. The mix includes candy sprinkles that offer a pop of color.

A closer look at the pancakes dotted with candy sprinkle "confetti."

The purchase of a Greenies bracelet allows buyer to plant a tree with the seed-embedded paper the bracelets come wrapped around.

Gratitude notes are filled with leave-behind notes bearing messages to brighten the day of friends, loved ones or even strangers.

For the POSHd home.

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Beaded fringe collar.

Clear globe purse.

Louis Vuitton Ala Moana introduces 'Haute Maroquinerie'

April 23rd, 2014
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Ala MoanaThe newly renovated Louis Vuitton store at Ala Moana Center made room for its Haute Maroquinerie bespoke handbags for those who want a hand in creating their own signature purse.David Franzen Photography

Louis Vuitton reopened its expanded Ala Moana Center store with an early morning blessing April 19, before the center opened.

The expansion allowed the arrival of LV's Haute Maroquinerie, with a special salon for afficionados of made-to-order leather goods, one of the few select LV boutiques offering the bespoke service worldwide.

The one-of-a-kind handbag personalization service offers clients the ability to select one of five shapes in two different sizes, with a palette of 26 colors in eight different types of leather, as well as hardware.

Ala MoanaThe store's new look.

lvdivaNadine Kam photos
This little pom, Diva, loves being toted around in LV.

lvpupDiva's human, Noelle Sasaki.

lv leathersThose seeking a personalized  'Haute Maroquinerie' handbag start by selecting one of five designs, available in two sizes, then has a choice of 26 colors and eight different styles of leather.

lvhardwareThen comes hardware selection.

The shapes available are:

>> Noé: Designed by Gaston Louis Vuitton in 1932 to carry champagne bottles.
>> Triangle: Created in 1934 to carry knit works.
>> Lock-it: A 1958 design that owes its name to the expression used when protecting ones’ precious belongings.
>> Milaris: One of two contemporary designs.
>> Neo Steamer: Trapeze-shaped original introduced in 2011.

Louis Vuitton's relationship with Hawaii dates back 32 years, when Ala Moana Center became home to its first freestanding store in Hawaii.

Valérie Chapoulaud-Floquet, President and Chief Executive Officer of Louis Vuitton Americas, noted, “Louis Vuitton has accompanied travelers to Hawaii since early 1880. Hawaii is one of our most vibrant markets with sophisticated global clients who appreciate the value of luxury.”

To commemorate the grand reopening, LV partnered with Hawaiian artist, dancer and cultural expert Sig Zane, to design artwork for the store’s vestibules. The hand-carved ilima design—honoring the history of the area—is accompanied by Zane's original Hawaiian chant, "Ka Lanakila Pio," expressing a love story between Louis Vuitton and Hawaii. The poem is written on kapa that resembles the Louis Vuitton damier pattern, with Hawaiian symbols of spear, pathway, waves and mountains.

In addition to women's leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories and jewelry, the expanded store carries a greater assortment of menwear and accessories.

For the opening, Louis Vuitton also created a limited edition Monogram Idylle pendant necklace, in 18k white gold necklace with sapphire pendant.

lvzaneFrom left, Brandy Serikaku, Kuhao Zane and Sig Zane in one of the vestibules bearing the artwork they created in collaboration with Paris artisans.

blessingThe store is blessed before employees and guests enter.

lvblessEmployees hands-on involvement with blessing the store.

lvmenPicture This! Photography
Part of the new menswear department.

lvfashThe reoriented staircase to the store's second floor. (more…)

Honolulu Eye Clinic hosts trunk show

March 11th, 2014
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If you're shopping for eyewear, check out this trunk show of designer brands taking place at Honolulu Eye Clinic from noon to 4 p.m. March 12, with discounts AND lunch! Can't beat that!

TrunkShowHEC