Archive for the ‘Art’ Category

LV scents trigger wanderlust

October 6th, 2016


After a long absence, fragrance is back at Louis Vuitton. Seven new scents capture the essence of travel that is in the DNA of the luxury brand.

Once upon a time, like every other major luxury brand, Louis Vuitton had its own line of fragrances, introduced in 1925. The last launch came in 1946, after the end of World War II.

Now, after a 70-year absence, fragrance is back in the big way with the launch of a seven-scent collection created by renowned third-generation Grasse perfumer Jacques Cavallier Belletrud.

The beautiful scents are made from all-natural ingredients using CO2 extraction to maintain the fragile essence of plants and flowers used.

The names of the fragrances tell a story of a journey through life and travels in keeping with the brand's roots in creating sturdy, stackable and waterproof trunks for travelers.


Ceramic keys, above and below, make it easy to smell the individual fragrances before selecting a few to try on.


The excursion starts with Rose Des Vents, evoking a field of roses in Belletrud’s home of Grasse, France, leading to Turbulences, with the scent of tuberoses, to stir excitement about the road ahead. Dans La Peau possesses an infusion of leather reflecting LV’s association with travel luggage. Apogee’s lily of the valley scent represents the pinnacle of travel, while the warm vanilla scent of Contre Moi (“Close to Me”) is one to snuggle up with when missing home. Matiere Noire (“Dark Matter”) blends dark wood and white narcissus and jasmine to create an air of mystery, and Mille Feux (“Thousand Lights”) is and ode to a starlit sky or Aurora Borealis, the light that contributes to the magic of travel.

The fragrances are presented in elegant apothecary-style bottles designed by Apple watch designer Mark Newson to reflect the heritage brand, combined with contemporary magnetic cap and illusion spray stem.

To mark the introduction, the Louis Vuitton Waikiki store recently presented an open house allowing shoppers to sample the new fragrances through a smart display including ceramic keys that allowed all to easily take in the individual scents before deciding which they wanted to try on their skin.

A display near the entrance at the Waikiki Louis Vuitton store.

Work on the fragrances began four years ago, and it was well worth the wait. All the fragrances are so great I wanted to try them all. Although unisex, a couple scents, such as Dans Le Peau and Matiere Noire struck me as more masculine. In the store, I was drawn mostly to the florals, but now I have taken to wearing Mille Feux most of the time, taken by the spark of the thousand lights of fireworks. The candy-like fragrance includes an infusion of raspberry, with osmanthus, iris and saffron.

Each 100 milliliter bottle is $240; 200 milliliter bottles are $350. Refills are available at $150 and $300, respectively. A mini set of all seven scents in 10 millileter sizes is $290. And a travel set of four 7.5 milliliter pocket atomizers is $240. Available at Louis Vuitton Waikiki and Ala Moana Center.


A display of Gump's perfume bottles through Oct. 18 reflects a shared luxury heritage that continues on the Waikiki site that was home to the Gump Building from 1928, and Louis Vuitton today.

Coinciding with the introduction and tied in with the local roots of the Gump Building that now houses the Louis Vuitton store, LV is also presenting a mini display of four Hawaiian carved wood perfume vessels created by Fritz Abplanalp in the mid-1930s. That's when Alice Spalding Bowen, a gallery manager at Gump's—Honolulu's original luxury store—had the idea of creating fragrances unique to Hawaii, for affluent steamship travelers.

Abplanalp used ohia, monkeypod, milo and hau woods to create the floral cases that housed vials of Pikake, Plumeria and Fern Lei fragrances. The bottles will be on display through Oct. 18, on loan from the Honolulu Museum of Art.


Also displayed is "Lei in a Bottle: Collecting Hawaiian Perfume Bottles," a book by Gwen and Evan Olins, tells the story of Hawaiian perfume bottles from the 1930s through '60s, including the Gump's story.

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Living culture at the MAMo Wearable Arts Show 2016

May 24th, 2016


One of Maui designer Anna Kahalekulu's models holds up a life-sustaining pohaku, or stone, the inspiration for her collection for the 10th annual MAMo Wearable Art Show.

Storyteller/performer Moses Goods opened the Maoli Arts Month 10th annual Wearable Art Show on May 18 at Hawaii Theatre with his tale of Maui "making plants fly" by shaping them into a lupe, or kite, reflecting the ingenuity of the demigod and the Hawaiian people, who, from humble materials, were able to create, clothe, house and feed themselves.

It was a tale befitting the show dedicated to showcasing the creativity of Native Hawaiian and Pacific designers, artists and cultural practitioners.

The show is one of the highlight events of a month that includes a film festival, storytelling festival and art exhibition.

With the click of 'ili 'ili and pahu rhythms with the speed of a heartbeat, Maui-based designer and educator Anna Kahalekulu, a first-timer to the Oahu show, was the first to present. Her show was focused on the pohaku, or stones considered to be one of the people's life-sustaining forces.

Her fabrics dyed with plant materials and alaea reflected the multi-colors and textures of stones from mountain to sea.

In addition to the work shown on stage, Rava Ray showed pieces, in the Hawaii Theatre lobby, that she created for last year's Honolulu Fashion Week, including this piece incorporating turkey, peacock and pheasant feathers.

The show was tamer than last year's event, when many an artist made a political statement regarding the building of the Thirty Meter Telescope atop Mauna Kea.

The show featured the return of Lufi Luteru, Wahine Toa, Maile Andrade and Marques Marzan. Maori designer Hone Bailey was there representing Aotearoa, or New Zealand.

With co-host and show director Robert Uluwehi Cazimero feeling under the weather, there wasn't as much of the comedic banter between him and producer emcee Vicky Holt Takamine as usual, but enough to add lightness and laughter to the evening.

A hair look created for 6th generation weaver Keaou Nelson's show of handwoven accessories.

Unfortunately, maybe I was laughing a little too hard regarding their tale of a missing connection at the airport due to confusion over Kauai designer Lavena Kehaulani Kekua's full name, which hadn't been included on the ticket.

Adding a double whammy to her day, I must have hit the stop button on my video camera, so her show isn't included as one of the videos below. It was a beautiful show of bold, handpainted scarves. All I can say is, "Sorry" and "Come back next year!"

And the same goes for the audience. Even at its most sedate, this is still one of the most lively shows in town.

Following the show, there was an after-party and trunk show where some girl snagged Kahalekulu's sleeveless yellow silk jacket I wanted.

And, as a testament to Wahine Toa's and designer Nita Pilago's popularity, there was a line at a private entrance for her work.

Another show will take place June 25 at the Maui Arts & Cultural Center. Call (808) 242-2787 for more information. Featured will be the work of Maile Andrade, Marques Marzan, Wahine Toa, Koa Johnson, Anna Kahalekulu, Elisha Clemons and Kehau Kekua.

Are designers ever done before showtime? Above, Marques Marzan adds black trim to one of his garments. Below left, Anna Kahalekulu works on a lauhala capelet, and Keoua Nelson works on one of his woven belts.

mamo anna

mamo nelson

Marzan's inspiration was the chiefly fan, the pe'ahi, that incorporated weaving and twining techniques, and often, human hair from a close relative or someone imbued with strong mana.

Here are the shows, in order of presentation:

Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Louis Vuitton Ala Moana introduces 'Haute Maroquinerie'

April 23rd, 2014

Ala MoanaThe newly renovated Louis Vuitton store at Ala Moana Center made room for its Haute Maroquinerie bespoke handbags for those who want a hand in creating their own signature purse.David Franzen Photography

Louis Vuitton reopened its expanded Ala Moana Center store with an early morning blessing April 19, before the center opened.

The expansion allowed the arrival of LV's Haute Maroquinerie, with a special salon for afficionados of made-to-order leather goods, one of the few select LV boutiques offering the bespoke service worldwide.

The one-of-a-kind handbag personalization service offers clients the ability to select one of five shapes in two different sizes, with a palette of 26 colors in eight different types of leather, as well as hardware.

Ala MoanaThe store's new look.

lvdivaNadine Kam photos
This little pom, Diva, loves being toted around in LV.

lvpupDiva's human, Noelle Sasaki.

lv leathersThose seeking a personalized  'Haute Maroquinerie' handbag start by selecting one of five designs, available in two sizes, then has a choice of 26 colors and eight different styles of leather.

lvhardwareThen comes hardware selection.

The shapes available are:

>> Noé: Designed by Gaston Louis Vuitton in 1932 to carry champagne bottles.
>> Triangle: Created in 1934 to carry knit works.
>> Lock-it: A 1958 design that owes its name to the expression used when protecting ones’ precious belongings.
>> Milaris: One of two contemporary designs.
>> Neo Steamer: Trapeze-shaped original introduced in 2011.

Louis Vuitton's relationship with Hawaii dates back 32 years, when Ala Moana Center became home to its first freestanding store in Hawaii.

Valérie Chapoulaud-Floquet, President and Chief Executive Officer of Louis Vuitton Americas, noted, “Louis Vuitton has accompanied travelers to Hawaii since early 1880. Hawaii is one of our most vibrant markets with sophisticated global clients who appreciate the value of luxury.”

To commemorate the grand reopening, LV partnered with Hawaiian artist, dancer and cultural expert Sig Zane, to design artwork for the store’s vestibules. The hand-carved ilima design—honoring the history of the area—is accompanied by Zane's original Hawaiian chant, "Ka Lanakila Pio," expressing a love story between Louis Vuitton and Hawaii. The poem is written on kapa that resembles the Louis Vuitton damier pattern, with Hawaiian symbols of spear, pathway, waves and mountains.

In addition to women's leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories and jewelry, the expanded store carries a greater assortment of menwear and accessories.

For the opening, Louis Vuitton also created a limited edition Monogram Idylle pendant necklace, in 18k white gold necklace with sapphire pendant.

lvzaneFrom left, Brandy Serikaku, Kuhao Zane and Sig Zane in one of the vestibules bearing the artwork they created in collaboration with Paris artisans.

blessingThe store is blessed before employees and guests enter.

lvblessEmployees hands-on involvement with blessing the store.

lvmenPicture This! Photography
Part of the new menswear department.

lvfashThe reoriented staircase to the store's second floor. (more…)

Vivienne Westwood celebrates 1st year in Waikiki

March 11th, 2014

westwoodRed, white and blue, the British way.Nadine Kam photos

Vivienne Westwood marked its first anniversary at The Moana Surfrider Hotel on March 6, a celebration of fearless, individualistic Brit style.

If you've got a wild side at all, you've got to love Dame Westwood, an icon of punk, new wave and shock fashion.

In spite of her ties to the U.K. punk scene and Malcolm McLaren's SEX boutique, I find the clothing carried here to be both original and more easy to wear than you'd imagine, given her reputation for eclectic, eccentric clothing.

You must check it out!

west2From left, Jason Alex Yapching, Azlinn Gregg and Catherine Caldwell.

west1Westwood boutique manager Jered Branco with Spa at Trump director Bridgette DeVore, left, and Malie Moran.

westwoodjVivienne Westwood statement necklaces, the larger with her signature Orb motif. You can see the design more clearly on the bag below:



Unfortunately, after early dinner at the Hyatt, I could only drop in at Westwood for a few minutes before heading to second dinner at Stage in the Honolulu Design Center, which was marking the return of chef Ron De Guzman and debuting a collection of fashion-inspired artwork. You can view more at my other blog, Take a Bite.


Edward Atkins wins Pull-In online vote

October 22nd, 2013


Online voters have selected Edward W.K. Atkins as the 4th artist whose design will be produced and sold next year in the Pull-in Hawaii 2014 Limited Collection celebrating the brand's flagship store opening in Waikiki.

Atkins joins three other winners selected earlier: Lee Maxwell, Kai Kawamoto and Koreena Nagain.

Winners will receive a cash prize and a launch party to promote their design and their work as artists. Atkins won with more than 1,200 votes out of 2,300, from a field of 43 artists who entered.

The store is slated to open at 227 Lewers St., Waikiki Beach Walk. Stayed tuned for more info about the opening date.

Pull-In was created in 2000 by  a former marketing director of Quiksilver Europe, Emmanuel Lohéac. The international French designer label features underwear and beachwear in eye-catching graphic prints for men, women and children. Originally created as a surf apparel brand, Pull-In quickly became popular with celebrities such as Madonna, Eva Mendes, Snoop Dogg and Ben Gordon of the Chicago Bulls.

HFM: 'Snapshot of Style' pops up at Kahala Mall

October 15th, 2013

Dallas Nagata White's "Lava Kiss" will be up for silent auction at Kahala Mall's "Snapshot of Style" event.

Kahala Mall will present “Snapshot of Style,” a pop-up photo gallery and fall shopping event for Hawai'i Fashion Month, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 16.

The one-night only exhibition of work by Hawaii photographers, including Kicka Witte, Keith Kandell, John Hook, David Murphey, Dallas Nagata White, and others, will highlight the event, an evening store crawl with sips and light bites as guests discover snapshots of fashion and lifestyle in Hawaii captured by camera.

Other highlights include in-store promotions, live DJ and an exclusive scavenger hunt with live prize giveaways at Center Court, including a two-night stay at The Modern Honolulu, a Kahala Mall shopping spree, and more.

Upon entry, guests will be given a VIP booklet which includes the following: an exclusive VIP savings pass, five featured photographs hidden in five participating stores. Guests will visit participating stores not only for great deals, but also to find the photos shown in the VIP booklet. After they complete the search, they’ll turn in their completed forms to be entered to win live prize giveaways at 8:30 p.m.

The five in-store photographs will also be featured in the Oct. 16 silent auction, with 100 percent of proceeds to benefit Kapiolani Medical Center’s Campaign for Children.

Some of the photos to be showcased at the event are already pretty famous, like the “Lava Kiss”
photo by Dallas Nagata White that went viral this year and was seen everywhere, including National Geographic online and the Huffington Post.

Visit for further event information or for further “Snapshot of Style” event details.

Pull-in Hawaii artists want your votes

October 8th, 2013

pull-in As noted in an earlier post, Pull-in Hawaii held its first live design competition at OUTFIT: Hawaii Fashion Designers Market, Oct. 2 and 3, and three winners have been named: Lee Maxwell, Kai Kawamoto and Koreena Nagai.

Their designs will be a part of the Pull-in Hawaii 2014 Limited Collection to be sold in the new Waikiki flagship store at Waikiki Beach Walk, 227 Lewers St., when it opens at the end of the year.

Winners also receive a cash prize and a personal launch party to promote their design and their work. But, there's still one more spot up for grabs, and the public is invited to cast votes for a fourth winning design. Voting will close at noon Oct. 16.

To view the entries, see who's on top, and vote, visit:

HFM: A celebration of 'Fashion as Art' at HiSAM

October 6th, 2013


Models tread carefully on the wet glass tiles of the Hawaii State Art Museum's Sculpture Garden during a First Friday show of bridal and evening wear featuring the work of 15 local designers.Photos by Nadine Kam

Adding a touch of glamour to First Friday festivities on Oct. 4 was the Hawai'i Fashion Month double bill of the HiSAM bridal and formal wear fashion show and "The Way We Wear" exhibition, which ran from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Hawai‘i State Art Museum.

The fashion show was free, one of the signature events of Hawai‘i Fashion Month, with designers showcasing evening and bridal gowns in the open air of the HiSAM sculpture garden, with a soundscape by DJ Teley Brandon. Featured designers were Nicole Vermillion, Lauren Tiburcio, Beverly Horton, Bernard Foong, Sarah Yama­shige, Randy A. Leano, Jaclyn Mae Santos, Chun Hui Chen, Sahra Indio, Feliz Salas, Ryan Hana­oka, Erin Midori Ludolph, Breanne Lee, Alegra Matsuo Mossman and Michele Y. Matsuo.

Attendees were encouraged to don black-tie and evening attire in keeping with the theme.

The evening started with a rain blessing, which ended with the start of the show, but started to come down hard, timed to the show's finale, which brought out either cheers or screams from fans. It was hard to tell which, but by show's end, visitors watching from the second-floor gallery had begun to scatter.

Non-flash video

All agreed the show was beautiful, though those of us who love fashion were saddened by the idea of the designers going home with gowns with wet hems. Maybe there's a good dry cleaner in town who is willing to offer their services.

The event also marked the opening of "The Way We Wear," an exhibit offering a glimpse into local culture through clothing from various times and places, with garments from the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts' Art in Public Places Program and on loan from the University of Hawaii at Manoa's Historic Costume Museum.

The free exhibition will continue through Jan. 18 in the Diamond Head Gallery. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays, except state and federal holidays. The museum is also open for First Friday from 6 to 9 p.m. (galleries close at 8:30 p.m.) monthly.
HiSAM is at 20 S. Hotel St. Call 586-0300.

More of HFM:


At left, Corin Gentry stopped to pose after the show with designer Erin Ludolph, right, and her model Mahina Alexander, and Condesa-Azria Nora Meijide-Gentry.


Designer Beverly Horton was one of the few designers to go with print. Her dress flowed beautifully on the runway. (more…)

Recent Posts

Recent Comments