Archive for the ‘Culture’ Category

Neiman Marcus + polo field

By
September 19th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Fourth generation polo playing brothers Carlitos, left, and Mariano Gracida, are the sons of 10-goal legend Carlos Gracida, from Mexico. With Emi Sklar, center.

The Hawaii International Polo Association presented the Hamptons-inspired Hawaii International Polo Championships Sept. 17 on Waimanalo Polo Field, welcoming international polo celebrities Nic Roldan, Luis Escobar, Juancito Bolini, and Carlitos and Mariano Gracida for a fundraising and exhibition match to support polo in Hawaii and provide horse clinics for disadvantaged youths.

Over in Honolulu, gray clouds loomed, and it was no different on the East side, but it made for a painless, sun-free sky with neither shades nor picture hat necessary to enjoy the sport. We wore them anyway in keeping with the spirit of the Hamptons in Hawaii, and in spite of the all-day gray weather, not a drop of rain fell.

Music by DJ Dorian Wright was the backdrop for the Hawaii Polo Life event that started with players arriving on the field via Makani Kai helicopters, and Red Bull jumpers BASE-jumped onto the field from the helicopter in a second pass.

On the ground, guests could check out new cars from JNExotics.

Tyeski Quintel brought her conure, Polito, named after Argentine polo player Polito Pieres. Little Polito hitches a ride on Marciano Gracidas' shoulder. (I think he was a little afraid of the bird.)

Neiman Marcus models on Waimanalo Polo Field before the start of the exhibition match.

Neiman Marcus was slated to stage a fashion presentation at half-time and had a comfy lounge set up for VIP guests, so it was like watching the game and parade of fashion—on both guests and models—from a living room sofa.

And of course there was food in addition to the finery, with Anicea Campanale of The Nook offering the best of upscale picnicking, including deviled eggs with wasabi and ikura, paté, Okinawan sweet potato salad, and more.

NM models, from left, Austin Kino, Eri Aihara and Alli McIntyre, show new fall looks available in the store now.

More looks from Neiman.

Among those showing up for the match were, from left, Mary Ronnow, Traci Brady and Lieren Pierson.

Also taking in the match were Ralph Perkins, with Angie Zhang in white lace.

North Shore horse and polo enthusiast Jeanna de Garcia, with a saddle-style bag from Mexico.

Local fashion designer Allegra Matsuo Mossman in one of her creations.

Model Daniella Abe in a denim look from Neiman Marcus.

The Nook's Anicea Campanale shows some of the food she prepared for the event, including charcuterie platters.

nm-food

Egg on egg. These deviled eggs topped with ikura had the perfect balance of salt and wasabi.

Delicious paté and shaved parmesan.

A dessert bar included mini apple pies for two and Magnolia Bakery's banana cream pudding, as well as an assortment of cookies, candies and macarons.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Inside the Int'l Market Place

By
August 24th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A treehouse built under the canopy of a 160-year-old banyan tree still remains at the heart of the reimagined International Market Place, which opens to the public tomorrow.

Three years in the making, the redesigned, reimagined International Market Place will open Aug. 25 following a 9:30 a.m. blessing.

It's a complete rehaul of what was, at the end of its tenure, mostly a warren of ticky-tacky tourist kiosks and random food court. It felt dark, small and confining.

A walk-through this morning with developer Taubman Centers chairman, president and CEO Robert Taubman revealed a thoroughly modern mall that is bright, and to borrow a word from the Donald, HUGE! In place of a uni-level center borne of tiki culture is a tri-level series of shops and restaurants worth the drive into Waikiki.

Taubman said he aimed to celebrate the area's history, not only of the market place, but with water features recalling 'Apuakehau Stream that once existed on the site.

At the center of the complex is the Queen's Court, built to honor Queen Emma and her family. As a gathering place, it houses a stage for daily performances.

It could not have been easy to design around the old market place's 160-year-old banyan tree, but they did it, as well as built into it a tree house reminiscent of the original that was home to original market place founder Don Beach, who made it his home and office.

Those who decry a lack of green space in Waikiki will be glad to see the shops opening to The Queen's Garden, honoring the legacy of Queen Emma, who, with King Kamehameha IV, founded The Queen's Medical Center. Medicinal plants incorporated into the landscape include pohinahina (medicinal tea), ki (used for asthma, fever and headaches), and hapu'u (used to dress wounds).

Queen Emma's statue, created by Viliami Toluta'u, stands in the Queen's Court.

Other plants were inspired by her Kauai residence, including purple bougainvillea and pink water lilies.

About half of the market place's approximately 70 retail shops are said to be opening tomorrow. I'm not so sure about that number. It seems high considering many of the shops were still works-in-progress today.

Of the 10 restaurants planned, from what I can tell, only Stripsteak by Michael Mina will be fully open beginning 11:30 a.m., as well as Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi.

As for the retail tenants, Crazy Shirts will be back, returning to its roots. Founder Rick Ralston, who eventually sold the company, got his start airbrushing T-shirts steps away from the old International Market Place in 1964, more than five decades ago.

Moving inward, from certain vantages, you can see all three levels of the market place.

Some of the retailers will be hosting special sales and events, including:

Fabletics: The activewear brand co-founded by Kate Hudson in 2013 has evolved beyond e-commerce into brick and mortar. During the grand opening of the new 1,946-square-foot retail space, guests will be able to enjoy a 20 percent discount on all purchases through Aug. 28, and there will be a door buster sale with a complimentary pair of black Salar capris with a $49 purchase for the first 50 customers all four days. There will also be light refreshments and champagne from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 27.

Jo Malone London: The bespoke fragrance brand will be introducing its newest fragrance collection, Basil & Neroli. Shoppers will be able to enjoy a relaxing hand and arm massage at the Jo Malone Tasting Bar and discover the brand’s signature Fragrance Combining.

Saks Fifth Avenue: The store will open following a 9:15 a.m. blessing and company president Marc Metrick and model Emma Hepburn Ferrer, granddaughter of Audrey Hepburn, will be among the guests. Hepburn Ferrer will appear on behalf of Decorté, a Japanese luxury beauty brand available exclusively at Saks. Beauty lovers will be able to enjoy Cirque de Beauté, a beauty event featuring makeovers, product sampling and fall previews and demonstrations on the ground floor.

Shinola: The Detroit-based modern design brand founded in 2011 conceived with the belief that products should be well made and built to last. It’s known for its dedication to thoughtful manufacturing of watches, bicycles, leather goods, journals and soon, audio equipment. To celebrate its grand opening of its 18th retail site, Shinola will feature music by Aloha Got Soul and serve Kalua pork sliders with Hawaiian slaw and Shinola cola floats with locally made ice cream from Dave’s Hawaiian Ice Cream from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday and 3 to 7 p.m. Aug. 27.

Swarovski: The crystal specialist will host a grand-opening event from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, highlighted by its fall-winter jewelry collections and gift items.

Vera Bradley: The new 1,800 square-foot store will carry the complete Vera Bradley collection of handbags, luggage and other travel items, accessories, eyewear, jewelry, and fragrances. On opening day Thursday, Vera Bradley will serve sips and sweet and savory treats, and host a grand opening giveaway. For updates, follow @VeraBradley on Twitter and Instagram.

The banyan tree stretches from the ground to the center's third-story restaurant level.

It must have been tricky building around the banyan. This is the support structure for the tree house.

Here's the roster of retail and restaurant tenants. A single asterisk (*) before the name indicates brands that are unique to the island.

SHOP
*45rpm
ABC Stores
*Abeo
Abercrombie & Fitch
Aesop
Anthropologie
Banana Republic
*BCBG MAX AZRIA
Brunello Cucinelli
*Capital Teas
*Catimini
Chapel Hats
*Christian Louboutin
Clarks
Crazy Shirts
*Fabletics
Flip Flop Shops
FootAction USA
Fossil
*Free People
GameStop
GNC Live Well
Godiva Belgium 1926
Greenroom Hawaii
*Hanna Andersson
*Herve Leger
Hilton Grand Vacations (kiosk)
Hollister
Honolulu Cookie Co.
*Intermix
Island Art & Sole
*Jo Malone
*Kona Coffee Purveyors
Laline
Lani Beach by Mireille
L'Occitane en Provence
LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
MAC
Maui Divers Jewelry
Michael Kors
*Mitsuwa Marketplace
*Oliver Peoples
*Ondademar
Pandora
Papyrus
*Penhaligon's
*Robin's Jean
*Saks Fifth Avenue
Sand People
*Seafolly Australia
*Shinola
Shoe Palace
*Stuart Weitzman
*Sugarfina
Sunglass Hut
Swarovski
Tabora Gallery
Tesla
*Trina Turk
Vera Bradley
Vilebrequin
*YOGASMOGA

EAT:
*Baku
*Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi
*Flour &; Barley
Goma Tei Ramen
*Herringbone
*Kona Grill
*STRIPSTEAK
*Yauatcha
*The STREET, A Michael Mina Social House

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Neko Café, for the love of cats

By
June 26th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Michelle Brown didn't mind Cardamom's foot on her face at the one-day Neko Café pop-up inside MORI by Art+Flea.

Hawaii is home to lots of animal lovers and familiarity with the Japanese concept of cafés with animals—from dogs to goats to snakes to owls—you can snuggle up to.

But it all started with cats, and during Adopt-A-Cat Month, the Hawaiian Humane Society teamed up with MORI by Art+Flea and Morning Glass to present a one-day pop-up Neko Cafe at Ward Village Shops.

I thought it would be a lazy Saturday far from the masses at the grand opening of Ala Moana Center's Japan Village Walk June 25, but I arrived at MORI to see a long line and steady stream of people wanting in for the opportunity to sit and cuddle with a cat.

Because some of them were already cat owners with no intention to adopt, I have no idea why they would wait in line to pet another cat.

Many hands at work.

The event was to have ended at 2 p.m., but that's about when they cut off the line, still about two hours long because people who were sitting with the cats were in no rush to leave. By that time, nine out of 20 cats had been adopted.

MORI director Aly Ishikuni said she was surprised by the turnout and said because of the enthusiasm, this won't be the last cat cafe we'll be seeing in Honolulu. A lot of the people in the crowd are advocating for a permanent site to help alleviate the stray/abandoned cat over-population on Oahu.

As a bird person, I ask, how about a bird cafe too?

Hawaii people love a line.

Tania Torres dressed for the occasion.

Christine Kam of Hawaiian Humane Society holds on to one of the more active kittens.

In addition to petting cats and purchasing refreshments from Morning Glass, attendees could make a donation to the Humane Society to help care for animals in their charge. Kela Wong, left, and Michi Sato, were helping out.

Cat owners and cat lovers could shop for a variety of made in Hawaii cat merch, such as these YKNOT bow ties.

There was also cute ceramic ware, big and small, by Dee Oliva.

Something for the wall.

Or a tank top to wear.

Mahina Akimoto of Morning Glass, with one of the kittens.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

June is time to go crazy for cats

By
June 8th, 2016



PHOTO COURTESY HAWAIIAN HUMANE SOCIETY

The Hawaiian Humane Society is bringing its cats out into the community during Adopt-a-Cat month, including introducing a pop-up Neko Cafe at MORI by Art+Flea. This cat has David Bowie eyes.

I'm not a cat person, but I've often wondered why cat people are labeled "crazy," when dog people are not. It seems to me dog people are the ones marching their four-legged friends into stores and restaurants, pushing them in baby strollers, or carrying their clothed pets around like babies. Who's the real crazy?

Anyway, to indulge "crazy" cat people, June is Adopt-a-Cat month and Crazy Shirts and the Hawaiian Humane Society will be hosting an adoption event at Crazy Shirts’ Pearlridge store from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 11. Crazy Shirts will cover the regular adoption fee of $75 for the first 20 kittens to be adopted kittens from HHS.

crazy

The apparel company has also released its annual Adopt-a-Cat design with a portion of the proceeds benefiting the humane society. The front of the T-shirt features an illustration of smiling kittens on a skateboard, while the back shows the rear view of the mousers and reads “Adopt-A-Cat, Hawaiian Humane Society, People for animals. Animals for people.”

The designs are available in men’s white crew neck Ts, women’s scoop neck Ts, and children’s white classic crew neck Ts. T-shirts, priced form $21 to $29, can be purchased at select Crazy Shirts retail stores and at CrazyShirts.com.

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Who wouldn't love a kitten as cute as Jasper, from the Hawaiian Humane Society?

Then later this month, the humane society will partner with Mori by Art+Flea to host Neko Cafe, Hawaii's first pop-up cat cafe. The event will take place 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 25 at the Mori boutique at Ward Warehouse. The event will feature Morning Glass Coffee in the company of cats and kittens available for adoption. Adoption fees will be waived at this event.

The shop will also be hosting special pop-ups offering one-of-a-kind cat themed products and art by a handful of local vendors and artists including Cat Party Hawaii, Lila Lee, Natalie Nakasone, Smokey Road Publishing, Aloha Siempre, ADIDAP, Mistprint, and more.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Spot's collar spells out his wish.

For those wishing to adopt direct, all adoption fees for cats 6 months and older at the humane society this month will be waived, and I.D. tags will be 25 percent off. On June 9 and 10, the cost of adopting a kitten will be reduced to $10. Fees cover such services as spay/neuter surgery, health examinations, microchip I.D.s and post-adoption health care for two weeks. Call 356-2225 for more information.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Oscar de la Renta at DeYoung

By
April 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Oscar de la Renta's 2000-01 Spanish-influenced designs were the focal point of one of the tableau in a retrospective of his work at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. The exhibition continues through May 30.

"Oscar de la Renta: The Retrospective" on view at the de Young Museum of Fine Arts in San Fransisco, celebrates the work of the designer who was born in the Dominican Republic, trained in Spain, and made his career in the United States, until his death on Oct. 20, 2014, at the age of 82.

The world premiere exhibition, curated by André Leon Talley, former editor-at-large for Vogue magazine, includes 120 ensembles, curated from the best museums in the United States, and his friends, family and clients.

The designer was born Oscar Arístides Renta Fiallo in the Dominican Republic and trained with Spanish designers Cristóbal Balenciaga and Lanvin designer Antonio del Castillo.

After moving to the United States to create ready-to-wear fashion in the early 1960s, he made his name as by dressing First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. In addition to designing for his own eponymous brand, he designed the haute couture collection for Balmain between 1993 and 2002.

The exhibition covers five decades of de la Renta fashion, but instead of being organized chronologically, it is organized by themes, showing how Spanish influences in his life were consistently reflected in his work. Other galleries reflect a fascination with Asia, a love of gardens, and his popularity with New York society, celebrities and heads of state over decades. He dressed everyone from Audrey Hepburn and Liza Minnelli to Rihanna and Taylor Swift, and the show closes with some of his red carpet creations.

Beyond fashion, a video gallery screens mini docs about the designer, including his desire to give back to his home country, by opening schools and orphanages to help disadvantaged children.
———————
Tickets for the Oscar de la Renta exhibition at the de Young Museum in San Francisco start at $30 per person, including general admission. Discounts available for seniors, students and youth. Free for ages 5 and younger. Premium tickets are also available. The museum is in Golden Gate Park, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive. Open 9:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays, through May 30.

Some of my favorite pieces in the Spanish section were those the designer created for Balmain. This summer dance dress and bolero were worn by De la Renta's wife Annette. It comprises silk, jet beads, passementerie and raffia.

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This spring 2005 flounced lace evening dress was designed especially for Annette and was the designer's favorite, comprising black tulle and black silk taffeta applique.

De la Renta enjoyed gardening and that was the theme of a Vogue photo shoot by Peter Lindbergh, published in October 1997. These mannequins in floral silk Balmain gowns were arranged to recreate one of the images.

Acknowledging the rise of the Asian model that coincided with China's and Korea's growing economic power, Vogue reimagined a 1948 Cecil Beaton photograph, with eight Asian models wearing Oscar de la Renta Spring 2011 ballgowns. The new photo was shot by Steven Meisel. This detail of the photo is displayed on a video screen, with mannequins in the dresses posed in similar fashion.

Detail of jeweled tassels gracing a jacket and skirt ensemble from one of de la Renta's Asia-inspired collections.

This 1998-99 Oscar de la Renta for Pierre Balmain evening dress is of green silk tafetta with beads, sequins and metallic thread embroidery. It was juxtaposed with Russian artist Konstantin Makovsky's 1884 painting, "Preparing for the Wedding."

More Spanish ruffles.

I'm too sexy for Dubai

By
April 21st, 2016



PHOTO BY CRAIG T. KOJIMA / ckojima@staradvertiser.com

I had to dig into my closets and drawers to come up with a handful of garments appropriate for travel to Dubai, which means covering shoulders and hemlines below the knees. This is one of the few dresses I have that isn't a shoulder-baring tank style.

Pretty much no one in Hawaii would use the words "too sexy" to describe me. I don't dress provocatively and don't strut around as if I think I'm God's gift to men. If I do bare arms almost every day, it's because our Western standards make it OK in a hot, beachy city, to walk the streets in tank tops. That's not sexy, that's normal.

Dressing for Dubai, where I'm traveling, is another matter. I hear it's a cosmopolitan city where people forgive Westerners their trespasses and tourists wear anything they want. But I think it's wise to respect one's hosts when traveling abroad and in Dubai, an Arab city, that means covering up as much skin as possible, from shoulders downward.

Problem was, I had to dig through my closets and drawers to find shirts and dresses with sleeves, that weren't too low cut, that didn't have cut-outs, and dresses and skirts that fell below my knees. And, came up pretty much empty-handed.

So, I went shopping. And, couldn't find anything.

It's because most Western dress that I would want to wear, is provocative in some way. Trends often reflect the shifting focus on different erogenous zones, selecting what is to be concealed and revealed to maximize the beauty of the female form.

Hydrating masks from TheFaceShop will be my skin's best friends in the desert. Alas, I forgot my sunscreen at home!

So, if I found a top with a high neckline, I'd turn it around and find a low-cut back. A lot of sleeves today have cut-outs to show more skin. Many tops are so long that shorter girls like me are wearing them as dresses that are about an inch or two away from impropriety.

All I found were a few cast-off long skirts—no doubt discarded for being unsexy—from Goodwill. I dug some more at home and cobbled together five days worth of garments that might pass muster when worn with scarves, and I also figured I could wear leggings under some tunic-style dresses.

There was one shirtdress I dug out of a suitcase, and I wondered why I never wore it. Was it too tight?

Nope. I tried it on and it fit in all the right places, but, it was too long by about four inches and I never got around to hemming it, so the length made it perfect for Dubai.

Only problem was, to my eye and sense of proportion, it was too long, so it stayed at home.

There's appropriateness in terms of cultural mores, and appropriateness by fashion's rules, and this time, fashion won. I'll see how it all works out.

NM Sogetsu show heralds spring

By
March 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A shopper stops for a closer look at one of the Sogetsu ikebana arrangements that were on view at Neiman Marcus.

On the anniversary of 3/11, the tragedy of the Japan earthquake and tsunami, a display of Sogetsu ikebana flower arrangements served as a symbol of man's resilience in the wake of disaster.

It was also nice to see flowers in bloom prior to the first day of spring, March 20.

The three-day "Art of Flowers ... Now" celebration of spring, art, fashion and flowers, took place at Neiman Marcus, which Sensei Linda Hamasaki and her 40 students of Sogetsu School of Ikebana, dressed with their dramatic creations March 11 through 13.

In a tie-in to the retailers' fashion, many of the Japanese-style arrangements featuring red, the color of the season. Arrangements incorporated local tropical plants, seasonal flowers and some spring flowers flown in from Japan.

Hamasaki, who has been practicing Sogetsu ikebana for more than 20 years, said that's not very long in terms that learning is a never-ending journey.

She said that the Sogetsu School stresses movement that expresses the energy of the living materials. It's the students' task to understand their plant materials and bring out their best.

She said that given the same materials and same lessons, each student will come out with something different.

"With any kind of artform, you're working with color, harmony and movement, but when you're working with living materials, you can't force it to do what you want, you have to adapt to it," she said.

Here's a look:

The artists posed for a photo during the opening of the exhibition.

Instructor Linda Hamasaki, with some of her students' work in the background.

Joyce “Seika” Tomonari created a towering display, including a base of metal that resembled branches.

A creation by Dorothy "Seien" Nitta and Barb Matsumoto was on view in the Shoe Salon.

A manikin peers from behind a protea arrangement by Tracie Iha and Joanne Chang.

An arrangement of  nanohana flowers imported from Japan.

An arrangement of nanohana flowers imported from Japan.

Even a "3 Stones" art installation was festooned by Shevaun Low.

Sheets of pink and red plastic were cut and manipulated with heat to accompany an ikebana anthurium arrangement by Joyce "Seika" Tomonari in the Jonathan Adler shop.

Ikebana heralds spring at NM

By
March 9th, 2016



PHOTO COURTESY NEIMAN MARCUS

Sheets of pink and red plastic were cut and manipulated with heat to accompany an ikebana anthurium arrangement to be featured in Neiman Marcus's Jonathan Adler shop.

During a three-day celebration of spring, art, fashion and flowers, Neiman Marcus will host a free Sogetsu Ikebana Exhibition by Sensei Linda Hamasaki and her 40 students of Sogetsu School of Ikebana, March 11 through 13.

The Japanese flower arranging displays will integrate the latest Neiman Marcus spring fashions, many featuring red, the color of the season.

The ikebana creations will incorporate local tropical plants, seasonal flowers and some spring flowers flown in from Japan. In addition, Joyce “Seika” Tomonari will be highlighting a sculpture designed by the late artist Michael Tom. The metal sculpture, entitled “House that Held the Sun” is from her personal art collection.

Each level in the store will house several large-scale arrangements by Sensei Hamasaki and her advanced students. The center aisle in Gift Galleries on Level Three will also serve as the “Sogetsu Gallery” housing 11 smaller arrangements.

A directory of the pieces will be available to guide guests through the store to view all of the arrangements.

Exhibition hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. March 11, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. March 12, and noon to 5 p.m. March 13.

Also, while in the store, enjoy the "Art of Fashion," informal modeling of the latest Spring 2016 trends throughout the store from noon to 2 p.m. today through March 14.

Other spring events:

Dolce & Gabbana Spring 2016: View the designers' latest collection inspired by the style and culture of Italy through the eyes of foreign tourists from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 10 to 12. Enjoy Italian-inspired refreshments and informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. March 11 and 12. In Designer Sportswear, Level Two.

Maria Canale for Forevermark: Meet the jewelry designer from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 10 to 12 and view her latest jewelry pieces, along with a special collection of rough diamonds available for purchase. In Precious Jewels Salon, Level One. Here's a link to my post about Canale's last visit to Hawaii: http://fashiontribe.staradvertiserblogs.com/2013/01/04/1905/

Eileen Fisher event: View the Spring 2016 Collection from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 11 and 12,
and enjoy informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. both days, in Sport Shop, Level Two.

Milly event: View the latest collection and receive a gift with a qualifying purchase, between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. March 11 and 12, in Sport Shop, Level Two.

Prom event: View some of spring’s best evening gowns 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 12, and pick up prom ideas during informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. There will be gown and wardrobe consultations, as well as makeover tips for prom season. Customers will receive a clutch with a qualifying purchase that day. Consultation appointments are limited; call 948-3444.

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