Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Inside the Int'l Market Place

By
August 24th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A treehouse built under the canopy of a 160-year-old banyan tree still remains at the heart of the reimagined International Market Place, which opens to the public tomorrow.

Three years in the making, the redesigned, reimagined International Market Place will open Aug. 25 following a 9:30 a.m. blessing.

It's a complete rehaul of what was, at the end of its tenure, mostly a warren of ticky-tacky tourist kiosks and random food court. It felt dark, small and confining.

A walk-through this morning with developer Taubman Centers chairman, president and CEO Robert Taubman revealed a thoroughly modern mall that is bright, and to borrow a word from the Donald, HUGE! In place of a uni-level center borne of tiki culture is a tri-level series of shops and restaurants worth the drive into Waikiki.

Taubman said he aimed to celebrate the area's history, not only of the market place, but with water features recalling 'Apuakehau Stream that once existed on the site.

At the center of the complex is the Queen's Court, built to honor Queen Emma and her family. As a gathering place, it houses a stage for daily performances.

It could not have been easy to design around the old market place's 160-year-old banyan tree, but they did it, as well as built into it a tree house reminiscent of the original that was home to original market place founder Don Beach, who made it his home and office.

Those who decry a lack of green space in Waikiki will be glad to see the shops opening to The Queen's Garden, honoring the legacy of Queen Emma, who, with King Kamehameha IV, founded The Queen's Medical Center. Medicinal plants incorporated into the landscape include pohinahina (medicinal tea), ki (used for asthma, fever and headaches), and hapu'u (used to dress wounds).

Queen Emma's statue, created by Viliami Toluta'u, stands in the Queen's Court.

Other plants were inspired by her Kauai residence, including purple bougainvillea and pink water lilies.

About half of the market place's approximately 70 retail shops are said to be opening tomorrow. I'm not so sure about that number. It seems high considering many of the shops were still works-in-progress today.

Of the 10 restaurants planned, from what I can tell, only Stripsteak by Michael Mina will be fully open beginning 11:30 a.m., as well as Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi.

As for the retail tenants, Crazy Shirts will be back, returning to its roots. Founder Rick Ralston, who eventually sold the company, got his start airbrushing T-shirts steps away from the old International Market Place in 1964, more than five decades ago.

Moving inward, from certain vantages, you can see all three levels of the market place.

Some of the retailers will be hosting special sales and events, including:

Fabletics: The activewear brand co-founded by Kate Hudson in 2013 has evolved beyond e-commerce into brick and mortar. During the grand opening of the new 1,946-square-foot retail space, guests will be able to enjoy a 20 percent discount on all purchases through Aug. 28, and there will be a door buster sale with a complimentary pair of black Salar capris with a $49 purchase for the first 50 customers all four days. There will also be light refreshments and champagne from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 27.

Jo Malone London: The bespoke fragrance brand will be introducing its newest fragrance collection, Basil & Neroli. Shoppers will be able to enjoy a relaxing hand and arm massage at the Jo Malone Tasting Bar and discover the brand’s signature Fragrance Combining.

Saks Fifth Avenue: The store will open following a 9:15 a.m. blessing and company president Marc Metrick and model Emma Hepburn Ferrer, granddaughter of Audrey Hepburn, will be among the guests. Hepburn Ferrer will appear on behalf of Decorté, a Japanese luxury beauty brand available exclusively at Saks. Beauty lovers will be able to enjoy Cirque de Beauté, a beauty event featuring makeovers, product sampling and fall previews and demonstrations on the ground floor.

Shinola: The Detroit-based modern design brand founded in 2011 conceived with the belief that products should be well made and built to last. It’s known for its dedication to thoughtful manufacturing of watches, bicycles, leather goods, journals and soon, audio equipment. To celebrate its grand opening of its 18th retail site, Shinola will feature music by Aloha Got Soul and serve Kalua pork sliders with Hawaiian slaw and Shinola cola floats with locally made ice cream from Dave’s Hawaiian Ice Cream from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday and 3 to 7 p.m. Aug. 27.

Swarovski: The crystal specialist will host a grand-opening event from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, highlighted by its fall-winter jewelry collections and gift items.

Vera Bradley: The new 1,800 square-foot store will carry the complete Vera Bradley collection of handbags, luggage and other travel items, accessories, eyewear, jewelry, and fragrances. On opening day Thursday, Vera Bradley will serve sips and sweet and savory treats, and host a grand opening giveaway. For updates, follow @VeraBradley on Twitter and Instagram.

The banyan tree stretches from the ground to the center's third-story restaurant level.

It must have been tricky building around the banyan. This is the support structure for the tree house.

Here's the roster of retail and restaurant tenants. A single asterisk (*) before the name indicates brands that are unique to the island.

SHOP
*45rpm
ABC Stores
*Abeo
Abercrombie & Fitch
Aesop
Anthropologie
Banana Republic
*BCBG MAX AZRIA
Brunello Cucinelli
*Capital Teas
*Catimini
Chapel Hats
*Christian Louboutin
Clarks
Crazy Shirts
*Fabletics
Flip Flop Shops
FootAction USA
Fossil
*Free People
GameStop
GNC Live Well
Godiva Belgium 1926
Greenroom Hawaii
*Hanna Andersson
*Herve Leger
Hilton Grand Vacations (kiosk)
Hollister
Honolulu Cookie Co.
*Intermix
Island Art & Sole
*Jo Malone
*Kona Coffee Purveyors
Laline
Lani Beach by Mireille
L'Occitane en Provence
LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
MAC
Maui Divers Jewelry
Michael Kors
*Mitsuwa Marketplace
*Oliver Peoples
*Ondademar
Pandora
Papyrus
*Penhaligon's
*Robin's Jean
*Saks Fifth Avenue
Sand People
*Seafolly Australia
*Shinola
Shoe Palace
*Stuart Weitzman
*Sugarfina
Sunglass Hut
Swarovski
Tabora Gallery
Tesla
*Trina Turk
Vera Bradley
Vilebrequin
*YOGASMOGA

EAT:
*Baku
*Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi
*Flour &; Barley
Goma Tei Ramen
*Herringbone
*Kona Grill
*STRIPSTEAK
*Yauatcha
*The STREET, A Michael Mina Social House

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Beauty trends at Macy's

By
August 17th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Joy Ramos, left, was the mannequin for the day as nine beauty brands worked their magic on her bare skin, from a foundation of skin care, to brows, lashes and full color look, during Macy's Ala Moana's inaugural Beauty Trend Show. Here, she's in the chair with representatives from Lancome.

Macy's hosted it's first Beauty Trend Event July 16 at the Ala Moana Center store, highlighted by something I haven't seen done here before, a start-to-finish makeover, from skin care to color, featuring several beauty brands.

It had to be hard to determine who would do what. Typically, each brand would perform a makeover using all of its own products, but that's not realistic.

I think even the most loyal customers pick and choose the best from each product line, and very few match their skin care to their choice of color brands.

Among skincare products highlighted were:
Clinique City Block Purifying Charcoal Cleansing Gel
SKII Facial Treatment Essence
Clarins Double Serum
Chanl Le Blanc Intensive Spot Treatment and Hydra Flash Balm
Shisedo Ibuki Beauty Sleeping Mask and Ibuki Quick Fix Mist
Origins Plantscription line

Color products featured:
Lancome Le Base Pro and Le Lipstick in "Clear"
Estée Lauder Nude Cushion Stick Double Wear Foundation
Benefit Browvo and Kabrow brow tamers
M.A.C Dazzle Eyes shadow
Urban Decay Vice Lips and makeup setting spray
Bobbi Brown Sunset Pink Collection

I stopped by the Benefit Brow Bar after the show, where nine brow-perfecting products are the most offered by any other brand on the beauty floor.

The "no makeup" makeup look continues to go strong into fall, with the "skin is in" belief that your own glowing skin is the best face you can put forward.

Also current are strongly contoured, thicker brows; and a range of soft neutral and nude lips to candle apple and red lipsticks.

Guests could drop in for a brow redo at Benefit's Brow Bar, with a line of nine products to help you achieve a bold look like Cara Delevingne's.

I finally had time to check out Lancome's Juicy Shakers, oil-based lip tints, that were a hit in Dubai when I was there in April.

It was also my first opportunity to actually try Lancome's Juicy Shaker since returning home from Dubai way back in April. It was funny that one of my friends wanted me to search for the Arab woman's beauty secret, kajal, or kohl, while I was there. I searched high and low because, the real Arab woman's beauty secret is contemporary beauty products, and I saw them lining up in the malls for the launch of the Juicy Shakers!

It's a new generation of pigmented oil "gloss," a combination of cranberry, peach, sweet almond and rose de muscat oils with lip-softening and antioxidant properties with just a hint of color. I'm using the Juicy Shaker in "Berry Tale" and love it. You can wear it as is for a sheer color wash, or wear it over any of your lipstick shades to give it a glossy coat.

———
Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Shiseido's Ibuki Quick Fix Mist puts you a spritz away from instant relief from skin's enemies, dehydration and stressed skin, while preventing makeup from wearing off or creasing.

Joy's finished look.

One of the sales associates in color by Urban Decay.

Dior hosts Winter 2016 preview

By
August 17th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

This dress was one of several modeled by Daniella Abe during a preview trunk show of Dior's Winter 2016 ready-to-wear collection. Styles are slated to begin arriving in stores next month.

I love the romance evident in fall's designs, and Dior delivers on the handworked, vintage-y vibe of the season. The boutique at T Galleria hosted a preview of its Winter 2016 collection on Aug. 15.

On view were ready-to-wear dresses in plush velvets and soft knits, with many pieces embellished with beads and paillettes in an ornate style I associate with 1950s Chinese brocades.

Also on the floor are early 1900s and menswear-inspired shoes, fabulous eyewear that shoppers just couldn't put down, and combat boots with bling that have people stomping their way all over Paris.

Footwear also was cued by the past, with high-vamp lace-up styles and color cues from menswear. But stiletto heels are purely femme.

Footwear also was cued by the past, with high-vamp lace-up styles and color cues from menswear. But stiletto heels are purely femme.

Carrying over from summer, a limited number of Dior X Rihanna collaboration sunglasses are available at the boutique now, at about $840.

Here's a video link with Rihanna in the sunglasses: dior.com

A bodice of velvet florals softens winter's black eveningwear.

The Rebel, a crystal-studded combat boot, is one of the design house's top sellers in Paris.

The T-strap has moved from center to side, leaving bystanders with a sparkle in their eyes as you walk across a room.

Like a color statement? Dior's new knit and Diorama satchel bag.

An embellished dress and coat, open and closed, in pretty winter white.

A high-waisted pencil skirt with black top and Dior's new lambskin Runway bag.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Trio of designers take stage at 47th Hui Makaala fashion show

By
July 26th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.comKaypee Soh presented the finale collection during the Hui Makaala 47th annual fashion show.

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Kaypee Soh presented the finale collection during the Hui Makaala 47th annual fashion show.

The Okinawan scholarship organization, Hui Makaala, presented its 47th fashion show July 24 at the Hilton Hawaiian Village, featuring Dolkii, Boutique Sharon, and Kaypee Soh.

First to present was Dolkii, created by sisters Shaiyanne Dar and Yasmin Dar Fasi. What started as Shaiyanne's blog in 2013, turned into an online boutique last year, and this season, the sisters created their first original designs, a dress and harem pant-inspired romper that reflect the casual, chic, boho essence of Dolkii.

Next up were designs from Joe Jeong's Boutique Sharon, reflecting the colorful mixed cultural heritage of Hawaii through fashion by Harari, local designer Anne Namba, Hawaiian artists and Italian clothiers.

Miss Hawaii 2016 Allison Chu walked the runway for all three segments. Here, she's pictured in an ensemble from Boutique Sharon. She also proved to be a quick-change artist, singing in between segments and rushing backstage to get into garments to open the shows.

Kaypee Soh presented the finale show inspired by Hawaii's rainbows and flora. Soh, who grew up in Malaysia, attended school in London, and started his career as a graphic designer. After moving to Hawaii in 2004, he found a niche in interiors, but his love of textiles and prints led to a natural evolution from wardrobing the home to outfitting the body. This spring-summer collection marks his first full collection, yet anyone seeing his work for the first time would think he's been working in fashion for years.

A day ahead of the show, I worried that pending tropical storm Darby might cause its cancellation. The day was humid, but the downpour in Honolulu waited until the evening. A good thing because this is the organization's major fund-raiser for scholarships, that in 2016 will go to:

* Stephanie Adaniya: Iolani School to Brown University; Biology
* Reese Asato: Iolani School to University of Purdue; Mechanical Engineering
* Dane Itomura: Punahou School to UC San Diego; Biology
* Kassie Odo: Pearl City High to Oregon State; Bio-engineering
* Shayna Pak: McKinley High to University of Hawaii at Manoa; Music
* Copeland Talkington: Kamaile Academy to UHM; Computer Science
* Marisa Tsuhako: Waiakea High to UHM; Master of Education
* Summer Tsukenjo: Sacred Hearts Academy to Kapiolani Community College; Education
* Jolyn Yoneshige: Castle High to Hawaii Pacific University; Education

Congratulations to all the scholarship recipients and all who worked hard to make sure the show when on in spite of the uncertain weather.

Allison Chu in one of Dolkii's original romper designs.

A stylized "rainbow" by Kaypee Soh.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her food coverage in print in Wednesday's Crave section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

GLAM! sale is on at Blaisdell

By
July 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Models walk the runway in upcycled designs by Charmaine Claire Viernes, right, during the 2016 Goodwill Goes GLAM! Doll Me Up fashion show that took place July 21 at the Blaisdell Exhibition Hall.

With Thursday's "Doll Me Up" fashion show produced by Kini Zamora, featuring upcycled designs by seven child and seven adult designers, the "Goodwill Goes GLAM!" sale is on.

Fans of thrifting can shop brand-name fashions and goods, both new and gently used at bargain prices under one roof at the colossal pop-up shop at the Blaisdell Center Exhibition Hall, 777 Ward Ave., through Sunday.

Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. July 22 and 23, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 24. Park free at McKinley High School. Tickets to the GLAM! sale are $4. Check facebook.com/goodwillhawaii for any weather updates due to the pending tropical storm Darby.

New additions to the event this year include a Hawaiian Telcom Entertainment Lounge equipped with TVs, a laptop/computer station and complimentary Wi-Fi access for shoppers.

No7 beauty products are being featured at the GLAM Spot featuring products from London-based Boots Alliance, available at Walgreen's Keeaumoku.

Boots Retail USA will also be hosting free beauty workshops and demonstrations from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on GLAM! sale days, featuring its No7 cosmetics and skincare products. The workshops will include a No7 "Match Made Foundation" service covering color-matching foundations, foundation tips and demonstrations; No7 "Sun Kissed Complexion" workshop offering tips on how to achieve radiant skin; and No7 "All About the Eyes" workshop on how to keep your eyes looking youthful with No7 eye products.

The schedule is as follows:

July 22 and 23
Noon: No7 Match Made Foundation Service
1 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion
2 p.m.: No7 Match Made Foundation Service
3 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion

July 24
Noon: No7 All About the Eyes
1 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion
2 p.m.: No7 All About the Eyes
3 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion

Kierra Akima, 11, won $300 for her sleek black cocktail dress created from fabric sourced from Goodwill garments.

During last night's fashion show, seven child designers, ages 10 to 12, and seven adult designers took on the task of creating new fashion by upcycling threads sourced from Goodwill stores.

The child designers, who had prior training from Sewciety Hawaii sewing school, were Kierra Akima, Keala Baclayon, Keanuenue Desoto, Ella Laird, Aubrey Lock, Skye Nagata and Kelly Oshita. The adults, from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Honolulu Community College fashion programs, were Matt Batulayan, Krystal Ann Cabo, Mitch Johns, Von Kaanaana, Charmaine Claire Viernes, Edmar Villa and Kaycee Yoshioka.

They had been selected at the beginning of the year to participate in the mentorship program led by Hawaii's "Project Runway" designer Kini Zamora, and the little ones did such an amazing job that during the runway show, guests probably didn't know they were seeing designs by pre-teens. They got their head start in sewing classes with Uakea Egami from Sewciety Hawaii.

Kaycee Yoshioka was the adult winner of $1,200 for her three-piece collection.

During my interview with Kini prior to the show, I mentioned that I had been sewing at that age, but now that I reflect back on my experience, I was only sewing shifts, jumpers, skirts and wrap dresses at 10 and 11. I was about four years away from any thoughts about evening wear, because my only evening needs were for prom.

I told him I was clearly not destined for a designing career because I didn't care about the process, only getting to wear the finished item. And, unlike many people who grow up to be designers, I never watched a Miss America pageant thinking, "I'm going to grow up and design gowns." It just didn't register.

I ran into a fellow journalist at the event and, because the little girls had talked—during film segments in between the fashion showcases— about what they wanted to be when they grew up (veterinarians and horseback riders dominated), we put the question to each other, and it turned out we both wanted to be journalists—a straight track.

Recent Honolulu Community College Fashion Technology graduate Matt Batulayan was inspired by Hopi kachina in coming up with his looks.

But like these young designers, there was an animal element involved that got me hooked. My parents subscribed to the Star-Bulletin and for some reason, when I was growing up, the newspaper was constantly running stories about the zoo. Human interest stories about the elephant's love interest, newborns, etc., and I kept a scrapbook of all the zoo happenings, which fueled my interest in the paper. Coz what child cares about politics?

The Goodwill Goes GLAM! event presented by Bank of Hawaii Foundation is now in its 5th year of raising awareness about Goodwill Hawaii’s mission to assist people having difficulty finding employment, offering them the services and tools they need to become self-sufficient. More than $280,000 was raised during last year's event, making it possible for Goodwill Hawaii to assist more than 11,000 individuals.

Guests entering the venue were greeted by models styled in Goodwill pieces.

VIP guests enjoyed a dinner presented by Jon Matsubara, culinary director of Forty Carrots at Bloomingdales Ala Moana Center. The main course was butter-poached beef tenderloin topped with thick-cut Nueske bacon and Hamakua mushrooms, served with creamed Ewa corn and sauce bordelaise.

Dessert during the meal focused on locally sourced ingredients was hibiscus sorbetto served over a slice of Frankie's Nursery honey cream pineapple, with a spearmint accent.

More photos are at TGIF: staradvertiser.com/tgif/tgif-photos/goodwill-goes-glam-july-21

Watch rebroadcasts on 'Olelo Channel 53 as follows:
6 p.m. Aug. 21
8 a.m. Aug. 22
5 p.m. Aug. 23
4 p.m. Aug. 28
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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Burberry reveals store revamp

By
July 18th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

The newly renovated Burberry store has reopened in its same location at Ala Moana Center's mall level. A front display featured this beautiful macramé trenchcoat.

Burberry Ala Moana marked the reopening of its renovated space with a blessing that took place July 14.

Shoppers walking into the store will see handbags in front, including Burberry's new Patchwork collection of runway bags, each named after a British street and crafted with different leathers, fabrics, color combinations and adornment, so no two are alike. They also offer the versatility of being worn as a shoulder bag, crossbody bag or carried as a clutch.

New to the boutique are the brand's new Patchwork runway bag, tapestries of texture, fabric and finishing details, no two alike, and with the versatility of being carried three ways.

Of course I fell in love with the more casual Burberry rucksack that became the "It" bag when it debuted on spring's runway as part of the part of the Functionregalia collection, and was promptly seen on Cara Delevingne, Taylor Swift and "Suicide Squad's" Margot Robbie.

Just like much of Burberry's designs—including the classic trench coat—the style hails from Burberry's early 1920s military archive and has been reworked as a functional, lightweight carryall in water-resistant nylon.

A lineup of Thomas bear charms in check cashmere, with Mr. Trench Thomas in Burberry's iconic gabardine trench design.

Meanwhile founder Thomas Burberry's original gabardine coat was designed to offer protection from London's rain, but was found to be perfect for soldiers in the trenches of World War I. The khaki color offered camouflauge, and the coats many details—firmly entrenched in our idea of the trench—have practical rationale behind them. These include epaulets once used for anchoring binoculars, breast flaps that offered padding against a rifle's recoil or kick back, D-rings to hold ammunition, storm flaps and cuff straps to prevent cold and rain from entering one's sleeve. Today, it's a strong fashion statement for men and women.

A video screen at the front of the store will keep local shoppers up to date with imagery and live events streamed directly from the brand’s global headquarters in London.

iPads used by store associates are also connected to Burberry.com for unlimited access to worldwide stock. To offer further ease in shopping, a collect-in-store service allows those shopping at the website to pick up their order in store as early as the next day.
———————
The store is open from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Call (808) 951-6999. Or visit us.burberry.com.

The Burberry Scarf Bar features classic and lightweight cashmere scarf designs in more than 30 and prints available for monogramming up to three letters.

Burberry market manager Lorenzo Barbone and Ala Moana general manager Lori Chang untie the maile lei during a blessing of the newly renovated store at Ala Moana Center.

An array of eyewear to shield you from the summer sun.

Thomas bears find a home on Burberry's structured purses and popular rucksack, below.

burberry sac

After the blessing, guests enjoyed small bites served up by Chai Chaowasaree, including this bite-sized turkey sandwich topped with quail egg.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Party with The Collective in its new space at Ward Village

By
July 8th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Allison Izu, left, and Summer Shiigi will welcome shoppers to the grand opening of The Collective, their new work/retail space at Ward Warehouse, Ward Village Shops, July 9.

The Collective is hosting a grand opening party between 2 and 8 p.m. July 9, with light refreshments, new design launches, and an interactive photo booth from Shoots Booth allowing shoppers to show off their new outfits and purchases.

The Collective is a combination retail/design workspace for local brands Allison Izu and Ten Tomorrow's Summer Shiigi.

"The Collective," spelled out in cookies.

“We wanted to create a new boutique where customers can see our workspace and how we develop products while also enjoying a personalized shopping experience,” said Shiigi.

During a preview event July 8, the work tables were cleared for food catered by The Pig & The Lady. Directly below the food service area were rolls and rolls of fabric representing the next few months of designs.

"Aren't you afraid something will spill?" I asked.

Shiigi's response? "Yeah, it could happen, but it'll all be worth it."

Schedules and two months of designs in allison Izu's workspace.

Allison Izu Song of Allison Izu and Shiigi of Ten Tomorrow founded The Collective (formerly known as The Cut Collective) in 2013 with the aim of, not only developing their own brands, but to provide a space for independent local designers to also develop their own “made in Hawaii” brands.

The pair continue to use their expertise in consulting and mentoring to help other local brands achieve their goals.

During the grand opening event, the first 25 shoppers to spend $250 or more will receive a gift with purchase. The designers will also be launching a stamp card rewards program on the same day.
————————
The Collective is at 1050 Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 1460, at the Diamond Head of the mall. It's open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. Call (808) 591-6219, or visit thecollectivehi.com, or email info@thecollectivehi.com.

The Collective's retail space is at the front of the shop, and work space is in the back.

.

Shiigi got a lei and a hug from one well-wisher.

The Pig & The Lady provided the food during a preview event July 8.

Hangers that form part of the boutique's decor looked like clouds.

Champagne for the occasion.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Reyn Spooner marks 60 years

By
July 8th, 2016



Reyn Spooner marked it's 60th anniversary with a fashion show on Ala Moana Center's Center Stage July 7, that took viewers on a journey from the 1950s to the present.

Opening the show were models Roycen Dehmer and Desmond Centro in Reyn's rice bag shorts from the 1950s, that had emcee Jordan Segundo quipping, "They did a lot of recycling then."

I'm glad that recycling is back in a big way, showing that good ideas may skip a generation, but always come back with a generation seeking the "new."

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

From left, in Reyn Spooner, company chairman Charlie Baxter, president Kirk Hubbard III, and Japan partners Takuro Sakatoku, Ryota Matsumoto and Fumio Matsubara, following the brand's fashion show on Ala Moana's Center Stage.

Sixty years is a grandpa territory, but over the years, Reyn Spooner has remained relevant in keeping up with the times. In recent years, the brand has collaborated with such urban lifestyle and fashion brands as Stüssy, Opening Ceremony, Converse and Vans.

And, it doesn't end there.

Company chairman Charlie Baxter, a former San Francisco-based e-commerce CEO, invested in Reyn Spooner because he said he sees its potential reach far beyond Hawaii's shores.

"It's really a state treasure," he said, with a history of influencing many major resort and lifestyle brands, and a story that resonates around the globe for people who love Hawaii.

Always cognizant of its Hawaii roots and ties to community, one of Reyn Spooner's latest designs Reyn Spooner designs is a limited edition aloha print honoring The Friends of Iolani Palace’s 50th anniversary. A portion of sales will support the organization’s restoration, preservation and conservation efforts. The shirts retail for $118, women’s scarves are $80, and eco totes are $26.

The company initially found its niche creating an aloha shirt casual enough for weekends, and dignified enough for customers to wear professionally. Back then, the only shirts on the market were poor fitting, loud-colored garments made for the fledgling tourism industry.

One of the company's biggest hits was an all-cotton, pullover aloha shirt with a button-down collar. But founder Reyn McCullough wasn't satisfied with the intensity and brightness of the tropical- and calico-print fabrics he was using. He liked the shirts worn by surfers—those bleached out by constant sun exposure. After experimenting with ways to achieve the same chambray effect, he realized the easiest solution was to simply turn his fabrics inside out. The company is still widely recognized as the originator of the "reverse print" they remain famous for today.

Following the fashion show, the celebration continued at the Reyn Spooner store near Macy's. Guests were treated to seafood dishes from Roy's Restaurant, with signature Spooner Kloth serving as a table cloth.

Hamachi and sea asparagus over Spooner Kloth.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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