Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

GLAM! sale is on at Blaisdell

By
July 23rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Models walk the runway in upcycled designs by Charmaine Claire Viernes, right, during the 2016 Goodwill Goes GLAM! Doll Me Up fashion show that took place July 21 at the Blaisdell Exhibition Hall.

With Thursday's "Doll Me Up" fashion show produced by Kini Zamora, featuring upcycled designs by seven child and seven adult designers, the "Goodwill Goes GLAM!" sale is on.

Fans of thrifting can shop brand-name fashions and goods, both new and gently used at bargain prices under one roof at the colossal pop-up shop at the Blaisdell Center Exhibition Hall, 777 Ward Ave., through Sunday.

Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. July 22 and 23, and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 24. Park free at McKinley High School. Tickets to the GLAM! sale are $4. Check facebook.com/goodwillhawaii for any weather updates due to the pending tropical storm Darby.

New additions to the event this year include a Hawaiian Telcom Entertainment Lounge equipped with TVs, a laptop/computer station and complimentary Wi-Fi access for shoppers.

No7 beauty products are being featured at the GLAM Spot featuring products from London-based Boots Alliance, available at Walgreen's Keeaumoku.

Boots Retail USA will also be hosting free beauty workshops and demonstrations from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on GLAM! sale days, featuring its No7 cosmetics and skincare products. The workshops will include a No7 "Match Made Foundation" service covering color-matching foundations, foundation tips and demonstrations; No7 "Sun Kissed Complexion" workshop offering tips on how to achieve radiant skin; and No7 "All About the Eyes" workshop on how to keep your eyes looking youthful with No7 eye products.

The schedule is as follows:

July 22 and 23
Noon: No7 Match Made Foundation Service
1 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion
2 p.m.: No7 Match Made Foundation Service
3 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion

July 24
Noon: No7 All About the Eyes
1 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion
2 p.m.: No7 All About the Eyes
3 p.m.: No7 Sun Kissed Complexion

Kierra Akima, 11, won $300 for her sleek black cocktail dress created from fabric sourced from Goodwill garments.

During last night's fashion show, seven child designers, ages 10 to 12, and seven adult designers took on the task of creating new fashion by upcycling threads sourced from Goodwill stores.

The child designers, who had prior training from Sewciety Hawaii sewing school, were Kierra Akima, Keala Baclayon, Keanuenue Desoto, Ella Laird, Aubrey Lock, Skye Nagata and Kelly Oshita. The adults, from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and Honolulu Community College fashion programs, were Matt Batulayan, Krystal Ann Cabo, Mitch Johns, Von Kaanaana, Charmaine Claire Viernes, Edmar Villa and Kaycee Yoshioka.

They had been selected at the beginning of the year to participate in the mentorship program led by Hawaii's "Project Runway" designer Kini Zamora, and the little ones did such an amazing job that during the runway show, guests probably didn't know they were seeing designs by pre-teens. They got their head start in sewing classes with Uakea Egami from Sewciety Hawaii.

Kaycee Yoshioka was the adult winner of $1,200 for her three-piece collection.

During my interview with Kini prior to the show, I mentioned that I had been sewing at that age, but now that I reflect back on my experience, I was only sewing shifts, jumpers, skirts and wrap dresses at 10 and 11. I was about four years away from any thoughts about evening wear, because my only evening needs were for prom.

I told him I was clearly not destined for a designing career because I didn't care about the process, only getting to wear the finished item. And, unlike many people who grow up to be designers, I never watched a Miss America pageant thinking, "I'm going to grow up and design gowns." It just didn't register.

I ran into a fellow journalist at the event and, because the little girls had talked—during film segments in between the fashion showcases— about what they wanted to be when they grew up (veterinarians and horseback riders dominated), we put the question to each other, and it turned out we both wanted to be journalists—a straight track.

Recent Honolulu Community College Fashion Technology graduate Matt Batulayan was inspired by Hopi kachina in coming up with his looks.

But like these young designers, there was an animal element involved that got me hooked. My parents subscribed to the Star-Bulletin and for some reason, when I was growing up, the newspaper was constantly running stories about the zoo. Human interest stories about the elephant's love interest, newborns, etc., and I kept a scrapbook of all the zoo happenings, which fueled my interest in the paper. Coz what child cares about politics?

The Goodwill Goes GLAM! event presented by Bank of Hawaii Foundation is now in its 5th year of raising awareness about Goodwill Hawaii’s mission to assist people having difficulty finding employment, offering them the services and tools they need to become self-sufficient. More than $280,000 was raised during last year's event, making it possible for Goodwill Hawaii to assist more than 11,000 individuals.

Guests entering the venue were greeted by models styled in Goodwill pieces.

VIP guests enjoyed a dinner presented by Jon Matsubara, culinary director of Forty Carrots at Bloomingdales Ala Moana Center. The main course was butter-poached beef tenderloin topped with thick-cut Nueske bacon and Hamakua mushrooms, served with creamed Ewa corn and sauce bordelaise.

Dessert during the meal focused on locally sourced ingredients was hibiscus sorbetto served over a slice of Frankie's Nursery honey cream pineapple, with a spearmint accent.

More photos are at TGIF: staradvertiser.com/tgif/tgif-photos/goodwill-goes-glam-july-21

Watch rebroadcasts on 'Olelo Channel 53 as follows:
6 p.m. Aug. 21
8 a.m. Aug. 22
5 p.m. Aug. 23
4 p.m. Aug. 28
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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Burberry reveals store revamp

By
July 18th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

The newly renovated Burberry store has reopened in its same location at Ala Moana Center's mall level. A front display featured this beautiful macramé trenchcoat.

Burberry Ala Moana marked the reopening of its renovated space with a blessing that took place July 14.

Shoppers walking into the store will see handbags in front, including Burberry's new Patchwork collection of runway bags, each named after a British street and crafted with different leathers, fabrics, color combinations and adornment, so no two are alike. They also offer the versatility of being worn as a shoulder bag, crossbody bag or carried as a clutch.

New to the boutique are the brand's new Patchwork runway bag, tapestries of texture, fabric and finishing details, no two alike, and with the versatility of being carried three ways.

Of course I fell in love with the more casual Burberry rucksack that became the "It" bag when it debuted on spring's runway as part of the part of the Functionregalia collection, and was promptly seen on Cara Delevingne, Taylor Swift and "Suicide Squad's" Margot Robbie.

Just like much of Burberry's designs—including the classic trench coat—the style hails from Burberry's early 1920s military archive and has been reworked as a functional, lightweight carryall in water-resistant nylon.

A lineup of Thomas bear charms in check cashmere, with Mr. Trench Thomas in Burberry's iconic gabardine trench design.

Meanwhile founder Thomas Burberry's original gabardine coat was designed to offer protection from London's rain, but was found to be perfect for soldiers in the trenches of World War I. The khaki color offered camouflauge, and the coats many details—firmly entrenched in our idea of the trench—have practical rationale behind them. These include epaulets once used for anchoring binoculars, breast flaps that offered padding against a rifle's recoil or kick back, D-rings to hold ammunition, storm flaps and cuff straps to prevent cold and rain from entering one's sleeve. Today, it's a strong fashion statement for men and women.

A video screen at the front of the store will keep local shoppers up to date with imagery and live events streamed directly from the brand’s global headquarters in London.

iPads used by store associates are also connected to Burberry.com for unlimited access to worldwide stock. To offer further ease in shopping, a collect-in-store service allows those shopping at the website to pick up their order in store as early as the next day.
———————
The store is open from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Call (808) 951-6999. Or visit us.burberry.com.

The Burberry Scarf Bar features classic and lightweight cashmere scarf designs in more than 30 and prints available for monogramming up to three letters.

Burberry market manager Lorenzo Barbone and Ala Moana general manager Lori Chang untie the maile lei during a blessing of the newly renovated store at Ala Moana Center.

An array of eyewear to shield you from the summer sun.

Thomas bears find a home on Burberry's structured purses and popular rucksack, below.

burberry sac

After the blessing, guests enjoyed small bites served up by Chai Chaowasaree, including this bite-sized turkey sandwich topped with quail egg.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Party with The Collective in its new space at Ward Village

By
July 8th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Allison Izu, left, and Summer Shiigi will welcome shoppers to the grand opening of The Collective, their new work/retail space at Ward Warehouse, Ward Village Shops, July 9.

The Collective is hosting a grand opening party between 2 and 8 p.m. July 9, with light refreshments, new design launches, and an interactive photo booth from Shoots Booth allowing shoppers to show off their new outfits and purchases.

The Collective is a combination retail/design workspace for local brands Allison Izu and Ten Tomorrow's Summer Shiigi.

"The Collective," spelled out in cookies.

“We wanted to create a new boutique where customers can see our workspace and how we develop products while also enjoying a personalized shopping experience,” said Shiigi.

During a preview event July 8, the work tables were cleared for food catered by The Pig & The Lady. Directly below the food service area were rolls and rolls of fabric representing the next few months of designs.

"Aren't you afraid something will spill?" I asked.

Shiigi's response? "Yeah, it could happen, but it'll all be worth it."

Schedules and two months of designs in allison Izu's workspace.

Allison Izu Song of Allison Izu and Shiigi of Ten Tomorrow founded The Collective (formerly known as The Cut Collective) in 2013 with the aim of, not only developing their own brands, but to provide a space for independent local designers to also develop their own “made in Hawaii” brands.

The pair continue to use their expertise in consulting and mentoring to help other local brands achieve their goals.

During the grand opening event, the first 25 shoppers to spend $250 or more will receive a gift with purchase. The designers will also be launching a stamp card rewards program on the same day.
————————
The Collective is at 1050 Ala Moana Boulevard, Suite 1460, at the Diamond Head of the mall. It's open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sundays. Call (808) 591-6219, or visit thecollectivehi.com, or email info@thecollectivehi.com.

The Collective's retail space is at the front of the shop, and work space is in the back.

.

Shiigi got a lei and a hug from one well-wisher.

The Pig & The Lady provided the food during a preview event July 8.

Hangers that form part of the boutique's decor looked like clouds.

Champagne for the occasion.

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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Reyn Spooner marks 60 years

By
July 8th, 2016



Reyn Spooner marked it's 60th anniversary with a fashion show on Ala Moana Center's Center Stage July 7, that took viewers on a journey from the 1950s to the present.

Opening the show were models Roycen Dehmer and Desmond Centro in Reyn's rice bag shorts from the 1950s, that had emcee Jordan Segundo quipping, "They did a lot of recycling then."

I'm glad that recycling is back in a big way, showing that good ideas may skip a generation, but always come back with a generation seeking the "new."

PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

From left, in Reyn Spooner, company chairman Charlie Baxter, president Kirk Hubbard III, and Japan partners Takuro Sakatoku, Ryota Matsumoto and Fumio Matsubara, following the brand's fashion show on Ala Moana's Center Stage.

Sixty years is a grandpa territory, but over the years, Reyn Spooner has remained relevant in keeping up with the times. In recent years, the brand has collaborated with such urban lifestyle and fashion brands as Stüssy, Opening Ceremony, Converse and Vans.

And, it doesn't end there.

Company chairman Charlie Baxter, a former San Francisco-based e-commerce CEO, invested in Reyn Spooner because he said he sees its potential reach far beyond Hawaii's shores.

"It's really a state treasure," he said, with a history of influencing many major resort and lifestyle brands, and a story that resonates around the globe for people who love Hawaii.

Always cognizant of its Hawaii roots and ties to community, one of Reyn Spooner's latest designs Reyn Spooner designs is a limited edition aloha print honoring The Friends of Iolani Palace’s 50th anniversary. A portion of sales will support the organization’s restoration, preservation and conservation efforts. The shirts retail for $118, women’s scarves are $80, and eco totes are $26.

The company initially found its niche creating an aloha shirt casual enough for weekends, and dignified enough for customers to wear professionally. Back then, the only shirts on the market were poor fitting, loud-colored garments made for the fledgling tourism industry.

One of the company's biggest hits was an all-cotton, pullover aloha shirt with a button-down collar. But founder Reyn McCullough wasn't satisfied with the intensity and brightness of the tropical- and calico-print fabrics he was using. He liked the shirts worn by surfers—those bleached out by constant sun exposure. After experimenting with ways to achieve the same chambray effect, he realized the easiest solution was to simply turn his fabrics inside out. The company is still widely recognized as the originator of the "reverse print" they remain famous for today.

Following the fashion show, the celebration continued at the Reyn Spooner store near Macy's. Guests were treated to seafood dishes from Roy's Restaurant, with signature Spooner Kloth serving as a table cloth.

Hamachi and sea asparagus over Spooner Kloth.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Neko Café, for the love of cats

By
June 26th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Michelle Brown didn't mind Cardamom's foot on her face at the one-day Neko Café pop-up inside MORI by Art+Flea.

Hawaii is home to lots of animal lovers and familiarity with the Japanese concept of cafés with animals—from dogs to goats to snakes to owls—you can snuggle up to.

But it all started with cats, and during Adopt-A-Cat Month, the Hawaiian Humane Society teamed up with MORI by Art+Flea and Morning Glass to present a one-day pop-up Neko Cafe at Ward Village Shops.

I thought it would be a lazy Saturday far from the masses at the grand opening of Ala Moana Center's Japan Village Walk June 25, but I arrived at MORI to see a long line and steady stream of people wanting in for the opportunity to sit and cuddle with a cat.

Because some of them were already cat owners with no intention to adopt, I have no idea why they would wait in line to pet another cat.

Many hands at work.

The event was to have ended at 2 p.m., but that's about when they cut off the line, still about two hours long because people who were sitting with the cats were in no rush to leave. By that time, nine out of 20 cats had been adopted.

MORI director Aly Ishikuni said she was surprised by the turnout and said because of the enthusiasm, this won't be the last cat cafe we'll be seeing in Honolulu. A lot of the people in the crowd are advocating for a permanent site to help alleviate the stray/abandoned cat over-population on Oahu.

As a bird person, I ask, how about a bird cafe too?

Hawaii people love a line.

Tania Torres dressed for the occasion.

Christine Kam of Hawaiian Humane Society holds on to one of the more active kittens.

In addition to petting cats and purchasing refreshments from Morning Glass, attendees could make a donation to the Humane Society to help care for animals in their charge. Kela Wong, left, and Michi Sato, were helping out.

Cat owners and cat lovers could shop for a variety of made in Hawaii cat merch, such as these YKNOT bow ties.

There was also cute ceramic ware, big and small, by Dee Oliva.

Something for the wall.

Or a tank top to wear.

Mahina Akimoto of Morning Glass, with one of the kittens.


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Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

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