Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Inside the Int'l Market Place

By
August 24th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A treehouse built under the canopy of a 160-year-old banyan tree still remains at the heart of the reimagined International Market Place, which opens to the public tomorrow.

Three years in the making, the redesigned, reimagined International Market Place will open Aug. 25 following a 9:30 a.m. blessing.

It's a complete rehaul of what was, at the end of its tenure, mostly a warren of ticky-tacky tourist kiosks and random food court. It felt dark, small and confining.

A walk-through this morning with developer Taubman Centers chairman, president and CEO Robert Taubman revealed a thoroughly modern mall that is bright, and to borrow a word from the Donald, HUGE! In place of a uni-level center borne of tiki culture is a tri-level series of shops and restaurants worth the drive into Waikiki.

Taubman said he aimed to celebrate the area's history, not only of the market place, but with water features recalling 'Apuakehau Stream that once existed on the site.

At the center of the complex is the Queen's Court, built to honor Queen Emma and her family. As a gathering place, it houses a stage for daily performances.

It could not have been easy to design around the old market place's 160-year-old banyan tree, but they did it, as well as built into it a tree house reminiscent of the original that was home to original market place founder Don Beach, who made it his home and office.

Those who decry a lack of green space in Waikiki will be glad to see the shops opening to The Queen's Garden, honoring the legacy of Queen Emma, who, with King Kamehameha IV, founded The Queen's Medical Center. Medicinal plants incorporated into the landscape include pohinahina (medicinal tea), ki (used for asthma, fever and headaches), and hapu'u (used to dress wounds).

Queen Emma's statue, created by Viliami Toluta'u, stands in the Queen's Court.

Other plants were inspired by her Kauai residence, including purple bougainvillea and pink water lilies.

About half of the market place's approximately 70 retail shops are said to be opening tomorrow. I'm not so sure about that number. It seems high considering many of the shops were still works-in-progress today.

Of the 10 restaurants planned, from what I can tell, only Stripsteak by Michael Mina will be fully open beginning 11:30 a.m., as well as Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi.

As for the retail tenants, Crazy Shirts will be back, returning to its roots. Founder Rick Ralston, who eventually sold the company, got his start airbrushing T-shirts steps away from the old International Market Place in 1964, more than five decades ago.

Moving inward, from certain vantages, you can see all three levels of the market place.

Some of the retailers will be hosting special sales and events, including:

Fabletics: The activewear brand co-founded by Kate Hudson in 2013 has evolved beyond e-commerce into brick and mortar. During the grand opening of the new 1,946-square-foot retail space, guests will be able to enjoy a 20 percent discount on all purchases through Aug. 28, and there will be a door buster sale with a complimentary pair of black Salar capris with a $49 purchase for the first 50 customers all four days. There will also be light refreshments and champagne from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Aug. 27.

Jo Malone London: The bespoke fragrance brand will be introducing its newest fragrance collection, Basil & Neroli. Shoppers will be able to enjoy a relaxing hand and arm massage at the Jo Malone Tasting Bar and discover the brand’s signature Fragrance Combining.

Saks Fifth Avenue: The store will open following a 9:15 a.m. blessing and company president Marc Metrick and model Emma Hepburn Ferrer, granddaughter of Audrey Hepburn, will be among the guests. Hepburn Ferrer will appear on behalf of Decorté, a Japanese luxury beauty brand available exclusively at Saks. Beauty lovers will be able to enjoy Cirque de Beauté, a beauty event featuring makeovers, product sampling and fall previews and demonstrations on the ground floor.

Shinola: The Detroit-based modern design brand founded in 2011 conceived with the belief that products should be well made and built to last. It’s known for its dedication to thoughtful manufacturing of watches, bicycles, leather goods, journals and soon, audio equipment. To celebrate its grand opening of its 18th retail site, Shinola will feature music by Aloha Got Soul and serve Kalua pork sliders with Hawaiian slaw and Shinola cola floats with locally made ice cream from Dave’s Hawaiian Ice Cream from noon to 5 p.m. Thursday and 3 to 7 p.m. Aug. 27.

Swarovski: The crystal specialist will host a grand-opening event from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, highlighted by its fall-winter jewelry collections and gift items.

Vera Bradley: The new 1,800 square-foot store will carry the complete Vera Bradley collection of handbags, luggage and other travel items, accessories, eyewear, jewelry, and fragrances. On opening day Thursday, Vera Bradley will serve sips and sweet and savory treats, and host a grand opening giveaway. For updates, follow @VeraBradley on Twitter and Instagram.

The banyan tree stretches from the ground to the center's third-story restaurant level.

It must have been tricky building around the banyan. This is the support structure for the tree house.

Here's the roster of retail and restaurant tenants. A single asterisk (*) before the name indicates brands that are unique to the island.

SHOP
*45rpm
ABC Stores
*Abeo
Abercrombie & Fitch
Aesop
Anthropologie
Banana Republic
*BCBG MAX AZRIA
Brunello Cucinelli
*Capital Teas
*Catimini
Chapel Hats
*Christian Louboutin
Clarks
Crazy Shirts
*Fabletics
Flip Flop Shops
FootAction USA
Fossil
*Free People
GameStop
GNC Live Well
Godiva Belgium 1926
Greenroom Hawaii
*Hanna Andersson
*Herve Leger
Hilton Grand Vacations (kiosk)
Hollister
Honolulu Cookie Co.
*Intermix
Island Art & Sole
*Jo Malone
*Kona Coffee Purveyors
Laline
Lani Beach by Mireille
L'Occitane en Provence
LUSH Fresh Handmade Cosmetics
MAC
Maui Divers Jewelry
Michael Kors
*Mitsuwa Marketplace
*Oliver Peoples
*Ondademar
Pandora
Papyrus
*Penhaligon's
*Robin's Jean
*Saks Fifth Avenue
Sand People
*Seafolly Australia
*Shinola
Shoe Palace
*Stuart Weitzman
*Sugarfina
Sunglass Hut
Swarovski
Tabora Gallery
Tesla
*Trina Turk
Vera Bradley
Vilebrequin
*YOGASMOGA

EAT:
*Baku
*Eating House 1849 by Roy Yamaguchi
*Flour &; Barley
Goma Tei Ramen
*Herringbone
*Kona Grill
*STRIPSTEAK
*Yauatcha
*The STREET, A Michael Mina Social House

———
Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Burberry reveals store revamp

By
July 18th, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

The newly renovated Burberry store has reopened in its same location at Ala Moana Center's mall level. A front display featured this beautiful macramé trenchcoat.

Burberry Ala Moana marked the reopening of its renovated space with a blessing that took place July 14.

Shoppers walking into the store will see handbags in front, including Burberry's new Patchwork collection of runway bags, each named after a British street and crafted with different leathers, fabrics, color combinations and adornment, so no two are alike. They also offer the versatility of being worn as a shoulder bag, crossbody bag or carried as a clutch.

New to the boutique are the brand's new Patchwork runway bag, tapestries of texture, fabric and finishing details, no two alike, and with the versatility of being carried three ways.

Of course I fell in love with the more casual Burberry rucksack that became the "It" bag when it debuted on spring's runway as part of the part of the Functionregalia collection, and was promptly seen on Cara Delevingne, Taylor Swift and "Suicide Squad's" Margot Robbie.

Just like much of Burberry's designs—including the classic trench coat—the style hails from Burberry's early 1920s military archive and has been reworked as a functional, lightweight carryall in water-resistant nylon.

A lineup of Thomas bear charms in check cashmere, with Mr. Trench Thomas in Burberry's iconic gabardine trench design.

Meanwhile founder Thomas Burberry's original gabardine coat was designed to offer protection from London's rain, but was found to be perfect for soldiers in the trenches of World War I. The khaki color offered camouflauge, and the coats many details—firmly entrenched in our idea of the trench—have practical rationale behind them. These include epaulets once used for anchoring binoculars, breast flaps that offered padding against a rifle's recoil or kick back, D-rings to hold ammunition, storm flaps and cuff straps to prevent cold and rain from entering one's sleeve. Today, it's a strong fashion statement for men and women.

A video screen at the front of the store will keep local shoppers up to date with imagery and live events streamed directly from the brand’s global headquarters in London.

iPads used by store associates are also connected to Burberry.com for unlimited access to worldwide stock. To offer further ease in shopping, a collect-in-store service allows those shopping at the website to pick up their order in store as early as the next day.
———————
The store is open from 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Saturdays, and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays. Call (808) 951-6999. Or visit us.burberry.com.

The Burberry Scarf Bar features classic and lightweight cashmere scarf designs in more than 30 and prints available for monogramming up to three letters.

Burberry market manager Lorenzo Barbone and Ala Moana general manager Lori Chang untie the maile lei during a blessing of the newly renovated store at Ala Moana Center.

An array of eyewear to shield you from the summer sun.

Thomas bears find a home on Burberry's structured purses and popular rucksack, below.

burberry sac

After the blessing, guests enjoyed small bites served up by Chai Chaowasaree, including this bite-sized turkey sandwich topped with quail egg.


———
Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Say 'boo' to summer sweats

By
June 3rd, 2016



PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

A chilling ghost story is one way to keep your cool over the summer. This Meiji period (1868-1912) nagajuban, or under kimono, with the sumi ink ghost design, floating from a lantern, typical of the Obon season.

During Obon season, ancestral spirits are said to return for a brief visit, providing the perfect backdrop for ghost stories, and coincidentally, one way to cool down over the long hot summer.

That's because blood vessels on the skin's surface contract when we're frightened, reducing the flow of blood and lowering the skin's temperature, which is why a scary story literally gives some people the chills.

That's just one of the interesting details to absorb from the “No Sweat: How Textiles Help Beat the Heat” summer exhibition at the Honolulu Museum of Art.

The exhibition is an exploration into the ways different cultures dealt with hot climates in terms of clothing choices.

The principles that drove ancient people continue to steer development of technologically advanced fibers and designs. That is, figuring out how to reduce moisture typically retained by clothing, and providing ventilation, something for all Hawaii designers to consider in their fabric choices and engineering.

The full story is in the June 4 Star-Advertiser.
__________
The Honolulu Museum of Art is at 900 S. Beretania St. Call 532-8700. Open 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays through Sept. 18 (closed July 4). Admission is $10 for adults, free for members and ages 17 and younger; also free 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Family Sundays the third Sunday of the month; the first Wednesday each month; and for Hawaii residents with I.D. on Restoration Day July 31.

Hitoe, women's unlined summer kimono employed a gauze weave for physical cooling, and water and garden motifs for a psychological cooling effect.

A bamboo waistcoat from 19th century China was an undergarment that served as a barrier between skin and clothing, providing ventilation and preventing fabric's heat-inducing sticking and clinging.

Ramie fibers are still used in Korea for their absorbent and quick-drying qualities. Ramie cloth in Korea is often referred to as "wings of a dragonfly" because of their transparency, providing ventilation in humid weather.

———
Nadine Kam is Style Editor and staff restaurant critic at the Honolulu Star-Advertiser; her fashion coverage in print in Saturday's Today section. Contact her via email at nkam@staradvertiser.com and follow her on Twitter, Instagram and Rebel Mouse.

Louis Vuitton Ala Moana introduces 'Haute Maroquinerie'

By
April 23rd, 2014



Ala MoanaThe newly renovated Louis Vuitton store at Ala Moana Center made room for its Haute Maroquinerie bespoke handbags for those who want a hand in creating their own signature purse.David Franzen Photography

Louis Vuitton reopened its expanded Ala Moana Center store with an early morning blessing April 19, before the center opened.

The expansion allowed the arrival of LV's Haute Maroquinerie, with a special salon for afficionados of made-to-order leather goods, one of the few select LV boutiques offering the bespoke service worldwide.

The one-of-a-kind handbag personalization service offers clients the ability to select one of five shapes in two different sizes, with a palette of 26 colors in eight different types of leather, as well as hardware.

Ala MoanaThe store's new look.

lvdivaNadine Kam photos
This little pom, Diva, loves being toted around in LV.

lvpupDiva's human, Noelle Sasaki.

lv leathersThose seeking a personalized  'Haute Maroquinerie' handbag start by selecting one of five designs, available in two sizes, then has a choice of 26 colors and eight different styles of leather.

lvhardwareThen comes hardware selection.

The shapes available are:

>> Noé: Designed by Gaston Louis Vuitton in 1932 to carry champagne bottles.
>> Triangle: Created in 1934 to carry knit works.
>> Lock-it: A 1958 design that owes its name to the expression used when protecting ones’ precious belongings.
>> Milaris: One of two contemporary designs.
>> Neo Steamer: Trapeze-shaped original introduced in 2011.

Louis Vuitton's relationship with Hawaii dates back 32 years, when Ala Moana Center became home to its first freestanding store in Hawaii.

Valérie Chapoulaud-Floquet, President and Chief Executive Officer of Louis Vuitton Americas, noted, “Louis Vuitton has accompanied travelers to Hawaii since early 1880. Hawaii is one of our most vibrant markets with sophisticated global clients who appreciate the value of luxury.”

To commemorate the grand reopening, LV partnered with Hawaiian artist, dancer and cultural expert Sig Zane, to design artwork for the store’s vestibules. The hand-carved ilima design—honoring the history of the area—is accompanied by Zane's original Hawaiian chant, "Ka Lanakila Pio," expressing a love story between Louis Vuitton and Hawaii. The poem is written on kapa that resembles the Louis Vuitton damier pattern, with Hawaiian symbols of spear, pathway, waves and mountains.

In addition to women's leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories and jewelry, the expanded store carries a greater assortment of menwear and accessories.

For the opening, Louis Vuitton also created a limited edition Monogram Idylle pendant necklace, in 18k white gold necklace with sapphire pendant.

lvzaneFrom left, Brandy Serikaku, Kuhao Zane and Sig Zane in one of the vestibules bearing the artwork they created in collaboration with Paris artisans.

blessingThe store is blessed before employees and guests enter.

lvblessEmployees hands-on involvement with blessing the store.

lvmenPicture This! Photography
Part of the new menswear department.

lvfashThe reoriented staircase to the store's second floor. (more…)

JLH marks 90th anniversary with Jazz Era soirée

By
April 16th, 2014



jlhholdFrom left, Kristina Belcourt, Bridgett Relphorde, who made her own cigarette holder from rolled cardboard that she blinged, and Michelle Richardson.Nadine Kam photos

Feathers, fringe, flappers and lace were in abundance and "Giggle juice" flowed at the Sheraton Waikiki Hotel & Resort April 12, when the Junior League of Honolulu went back to its Jazz Era roots—founded in 1923—to mark its 90th anniversary with a luncheon/fashion show featuring garments from Tori Richard's Spring 2014 women's collection.

In addition to the fun, glitz and glamour of the 1920s "Great Gatsby"-themed celebration, there was also some serious work going on as the organization pledged to give $90,000 to Oahu nonprofits over the next three years through its 90th Anniversary Community Fund. $45,000 will be awarded this year. The balance of the fund will be distributed over the next two years. Members also recognized past recipients of its annual Laura N. Dowsett Award, and honored JLH's 2014 recipient Cheryl Hetherington.

The award is named after Laura Nott Dowsett, a founding member of JLH and its president from 1933 to 1934. Hetherington, a civic leader and longtime Junior League member, received the award that was created in 1982, to recognize a sustaining member who personifies the spirit of voluntarism, the value of specialized training, the effectiveness of advocacy and the qualities of leadership developed in the JLH.

CherylHetheringtonHetherington served as JLH president from 2002 to 2003 and has raised money for a number of nonprofits including Friends of the Children’s Justice Center of O‘ahu (25th Anniversary), Honolulu Academy of Art (Kama‘aina Christmas), The Contemporary Museum (ConTempo) and JLH. Before dedicating her skills to community service, Hetherington practiced law as a solo practitioner from 1979 to 1994, taking on many pro bono cases in Family Court. A member of the Hawaii Bar Association, she served for five years with the Hearings Committee of the Office of Disciplinary Counsel for the State of Hawaii.

In recognition of the group's annual "Sacs in the City" fundraiser, more than 10 high-end handbags were auctioned to help support JLH's community programs.

jlhfashThe event was also highlighted by an informal fashion show featuring the Tori Richard Spring 2014 women's collection.

jlhFrom left, Becky Harrison, JLH president-elect Penelope Paik Thune and Ina Chang.

jlhpinstripeFrom left, JJ Dentel, Jeri Duncan in mobster pinstripes, and Tiffany Sterbin.

jlhjenJennifer and Justin Dotson.

jlh2Jessica Yamauchi, left, and JLH president Deborah Zysman.

jlh20sA photographic display dating from the 1920s to the present, played tribute to the Junior League founders and early members. Today, we tend to have a costumey view of 1920s fashion, but this is more typical summer dress.

jlhjJanice Choate-Zavakos looks her 1920s best in white and lace down to her stockings.

laceI did white lace as well, snapping a selfie outside my house, with Lynn Murray Sien's "Naked Pearl" rope necklace and Whiting & Davis mesh purse. I have at least three 1920s Mandalian mesh-and-enamel purses that I used to use, but today, they're too small to fit such 21st century necessities as phone and car keys. (more…)

First look: H&M Waikiki

By
March 25th, 2014



h&mA display at the entrance to the new H&M Waikiki, which opens Thursday. Not all these pieces are in stock, but they will be.Nadine Kam photos

After more than a decade's wait, H&M will open its first Hawaii location at noon March 27 in the Waikiki Business Plaza, with 31,000 square feet of fashion on two floors.

During a media preview this morning, we got a peek at the women's and men's styles that have won the brand fans all around the world.

As H&M enthusiast Malia Chung told me earlier, "I appreciate how H&M brings high fashion and runway style pieces to an affordable price point for us fashion fiends on a budget!
And the designer collaborations they're doing are amazing too."

It's been a long wait for those of us in Hawaii, and it was explained to me while working on last week's story about the grand opening, that they always seek the best location in any city they go into, and they were willing to wait for the central Kalakaua Avenue location.

The first 500 shoppers in line on the 27th will receive a limited-edition tote bag featuring the most popular images of local surf photographers Mike Coots, Sarah Lee and Zak Noyle, as well as an "Access to Fashion" pass valued from $10 to $500 to shop the store.

If you do happen to nab that $500 gift, that money will go a long way. There will be grand opening items priced at $5, and prices generally run about $19.95 to $34.95. Some of the higher-end items are about $129 to $169 and those are toward the left of the store's Kalakaua entrance.

New items arrive daily, and because there's such an emphasis on personal style here, they say that we shouldn't see others wearing the same things we choose. All I can say is that when someone pulled out a pair of banana-printed pants for me, that was her taste and I just said, "Oh, no."

We didn't get a chance to shop today, but I look forward to the opp soon!

A couple of videos showing the key women's looks:

http://youtu.be/JlJFXVNgJS4

http://youtu.be/bI768oyt71U

hmpineThis pineapple design beach coverup is $5, one of the grand opening specials.

hmlooksThese are some of the pricier looks.

hmspringMore spring dressing.

hmboots

hmaccessAn abundance of accessories are a stylist's dream.

hmmen2There's as much of an array of looks for men as for women.

hmmen1

Uniqlo-'IOLANI collaboration line due in May

By
January 22nd, 2014



uniqlo:iolaniUniqlo designers used prints and artwork from 'IOLANI Sportwear's archives, dating as far back as the 1960s, for the collaboration 'IOLANI Hawaiian Classics Collection, due in May. Many prints were scaled down to appeal to Uniqlo fans around the globe. The collection won over the fashion press during an earlier preview in Paris.Uniqlo photos

Uniqlo may not be coming to Hawaii any time soon, but a piece of Hawaii will be traveling to 1,200 Uniqlo stores around the globe this summer thanks to a collaboration between longtime kama'aina company 'IOLANI Sportswear, and the Tokyo-based apparel giant.

The announcement was made earlier  today during a news conference from the JFW-International Fashion Fair’s Hawaii Pavilion in Tokyo, where ‘IOLANI is one of several local clothing companies participating in a DBEDT-sponsored initiative promoting Hawaii designers abroad.

The 2014 spring/summer ‘IOLANI Hawaiian Classics line will be available in Uniqlo stores beginning in May. Because there is no Uniqlo store locally, online shopping will have to suffice for fans of both brands.

The collection will include men’s shirts, shorts and T-shirts and women’s tunics, dresses, shorts, handbags, skirts and T-shirts, all inspired by ‘IOLANI’s print archives, with design, fabric and production by Uniqlo.

The rest of the story will appear in tomorrow's Star-Advertiser.

uniqlo:ioAmong the Uniqlo collaboration 'IOLANI Hawaiian Classics pieces will be men's steteco pants, cooling long underwear intended to wear under trousers or yukata for added comfort during humid summer months. Uniqlo is bringing them back, creating contrast when worn under shorts.

Governor's Fashion Awards honors Hawaii talent

By
November 1st, 2013



govlifetime

David “Pua” Rochlen of Surf Line Hawaii/Jams World was the winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award at the reinstated Governors Fashion Awards ceremony that took place Oct. 30 at The MODERN Honolulu. Longtime fashion veteran Dale Hope, in a vintage 1965 Sandwich Isles tapa-print jacket presented the award with Gov. Neil Abercrombie.Nadine Kam photos

It was one of the best-dressed events of the year as the Hawaii's fashion industry gathered to honor their own during the reinstated Governor's Fashion Awards ceremony that took place Oct. 30 at The MODERN Honolulu, the dazzling finale to the inaugural Hawai'i Fashion Month.

Before announcing the award winners, Gov. Abercrombie, self-conscious about his age, chuckled as he spoke of having known Surf Line Hawaii founder David Rochlen, and Hilo Hattie inspiration Clarissa "Clara" "Hilo Hattie" Haili.

While it's easy for many of us have grown up with a certain amount of entitlement to bellyache about how hard it is to get ahead these days, he reminded the audience that we can look at behemoths like Hilo Hattie and Surf Line/Jams World today and imagine they were fully formed from the beginning, but he said that was not the case, and in reference to Rochlen, said he had a strong belief in the industry and the confidence to make things happen back in the 1960s when no one was listening.

For the governor, it was an eye-opening experience to watch how a few key people in the business and fashion communities could come together to make a big difference in a few years, such as launching Aloha Fridays to boost sales of aloha wear.

govhh

From left, Hilo Hattie's Terri Funakoshi, CEO/President Don Kang and Felix Calvo. The company was named Major Retailer of the Year, and Kang also picked up the award for Outstanding Professional of the Year for his part in rescuing the company following Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Otherwise, the company would likely not have survived to see its 50th anniversary this year.

In their remarks, Hawaii Fashion Incubator co-founders Toby Portner and Melissa White, co-chairs of Hawai'i Fashion Month along with Sen. Will Espero, said it is still their aim to see where the needs and goals of the fashion community intersect, and to bring competitors together to work for the common good of the entire industry.

Industry veteran Dale Hope reiterated that point in his tribute to 'Iolani Sportswear, saying how he was afraid to approach company founder Keiji Kawakami for help, but that it was common in the early days of the industry for competitors to help each other out in times of need, when machines broke or if they needed a loan to get by, and he later learned that Keiji felt fortunate for having been helped by Watumull's.

In accepting the Lifetime Achievement Award, David "Pua" Rochlen of Surf Line Hawaii/Jams World said that when he found out about it, he didn't know why he won and thought he was too young to receive it. He humbly acknowledged that he was once told of running the company started by his father, "You did one thing right, you didn't screw it up."

He reminded all that the Hawaii fashion industry is about more than clothing, but offers the opportunity for all of us to connect with a lifestyle, culture, food, and all the things that create a feeling others can't find at home or anywhere else in the world.

He also announced that he is starting a petition to encourage the state to acquire the Nike building in Waikiki to showcase made in Hawaii products to the visitor market year 'round.

Here are the winners of the Governor’s Fashion Awards, announced Wednesday night at The Modern Honolulu at the close of the inaugural Hawai‘i Fashion Month:

>> Major Retailer of the Year: Don Kang, Hilo Hattie
>> Boutique Retailer of the Year: Deborah Mascia, Mu‘umu‘u Heaven
>> Emerging Designer of the Year: Cora Spearman, Coradorables
>> Established Designer of the Year: Rona Bennett and Lan Chung, Fighting Eel
>> Designer, Contemporary: Ari South, Andy South
>> Designer, Aloha: Jamie Makasobe, Ane Bakutis and Hina Kneubuhl, Kealopiko
>> Designer, Couture/Formal: Anne Namba, Anne Namba Designs
>> Designer, Jewelry: Jason Dow, Jason Dow Inc.
>> Photographer: Harold Julian, Harold Julian Photography
>> Wardrobe Stylist: Amos Kotomori, Amos Kotomori Ltd.
>> Beauty Professional: Paul Brown, Paul Brown Salons
>> Outstanding Professional: Don Kang, Hilo Hattie
>> Lifetime Achievement: David “Pua” Rochlen, Jams World

Congratulations to all, the finalists, and all those who put in the work day after day to make Hawaii a more beautiful place to live.

govpua

Pua Rochlen with wife Heather and keiki Nacho, David III and Pumehana, surrounded by Surf Line/Jams World 20-year employees. He bought three tables for his loyal 20-year workers.

goviolani

Carla and Lloyd Kawakami of 'Iolani Sportswear were honored as the company marked its 60th anniversary this year. The family recently lost matriarch Edith Kawakami, but Carla said if she were here, she would remind them that any honors are  not about us as the owners, but about the people who make it happen and the people of Honolulu. (more…)

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