Archive for the ‘International fashion’ Category

Oscar de la Renta at DeYoung

April 23rd, 2016
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PHOTOS BY NADINE KAM / nkam@staradvertiser.com

Oscar de la Renta's 2000-01 Spanish-influenced designs were the focal point of one of the tableau in a retrospective of his work at the de Young Museum in San Francisco. The exhibition continues through May 30.

"Oscar de la Renta: The Retrospective" on view at the de Young Museum of Fine Arts in San Fransisco, celebrates the work of the designer who was born in the Dominican Republic, trained in Spain, and made his career in the United States, until his death on Oct. 20, 2014, at the age of 82.

The world premiere exhibition, curated by André Leon Talley, former editor-at-large for Vogue magazine, includes 120 ensembles, curated from the best museums in the United States, and his friends, family and clients.

The designer was born Oscar Arístides Renta Fiallo in the Dominican Republic and trained with Spanish designers Cristóbal Balenciaga and Lanvin designer Antonio del Castillo.

After moving to the United States to create ready-to-wear fashion in the early 1960s, he made his name as by dressing First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. In addition to designing for his own eponymous brand, he designed the haute couture collection for Balmain between 1993 and 2002.

The exhibition covers five decades of de la Renta fashion, but instead of being organized chronologically, it is organized by themes, showing how Spanish influences in his life were consistently reflected in his work. Other galleries reflect a fascination with Asia, a love of gardens, and his popularity with New York society, celebrities and heads of state over decades. He dressed everyone from Audrey Hepburn and Liza Minnelli to Rihanna and Taylor Swift, and the show closes with some of his red carpet creations.

Beyond fashion, a video gallery screens mini docs about the designer, including his desire to give back to his home country, by opening schools and orphanages to help disadvantaged children.
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Tickets for the Oscar de la Renta exhibition at the de Young Museum in San Francisco start at $30 per person, including general admission. Discounts available for seniors, students and youth. Free for ages 5 and younger. Premium tickets are also available. The museum is in Golden Gate Park, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive. Open 9:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays, through May 30.

Some of my favorite pieces in the Spanish section were those the designer created for Balmain. This summer dance dress and bolero were worn by De la Renta's wife Annette. It comprises silk, jet beads, passementerie and raffia.

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This spring 2005 flounced lace evening dress was designed especially for Annette and was the designer's favorite, comprising black tulle and black silk taffeta applique.

De la Renta enjoyed gardening and that was the theme of a Vogue photo shoot by Peter Lindbergh, published in October 1997. These mannequins in floral silk Balmain gowns were arranged to recreate one of the images.

Acknowledging the rise of the Asian model that coincided with China's and Korea's growing economic power, Vogue reimagined a 1948 Cecil Beaton photograph, with eight Asian models wearing Oscar de la Renta Spring 2011 ballgowns. The new photo was shot by Steven Meisel. This detail of the photo is displayed on a video screen, with mannequins in the dresses posed in similar fashion.

Detail of jeweled tassels gracing a jacket and skirt ensemble from one of de la Renta's Asia-inspired collections.

This 1998-99 Oscar de la Renta for Pierre Balmain evening dress is of green silk tafetta with beads, sequins and metallic thread embroidery. It was juxtaposed with Russian artist Konstantin Makovsky's 1884 painting, "Preparing for the Wedding."

More Spanish ruffles.

I'm too sexy for Dubai

April 21st, 2016
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PHOTO BY CRAIG T. KOJIMA / ckojima@staradvertiser.com

I had to dig into my closets and drawers to come up with a handful of garments appropriate for travel to Dubai, which means covering shoulders and hemlines below the knees. This is one of the few dresses I have that isn't a shoulder-baring tank style.

Pretty much no one in Hawaii would use the words "too sexy" to describe me. I don't dress provocatively and don't strut around as if I think I'm God's gift to men. If I do bare arms almost every day, it's because our Western standards make it OK in a hot, beachy city, to walk the streets in tank tops. That's not sexy, that's normal.

Dressing for Dubai, where I'm traveling, is another matter. I hear it's a cosmopolitan city where people forgive Westerners their trespasses and tourists wear anything they want. But I think it's wise to respect one's hosts when traveling abroad and in Dubai, an Arab city, that means covering up as much skin as possible, from shoulders downward.

Problem was, I had to dig through my closets and drawers to find shirts and dresses with sleeves, that weren't too low cut, that didn't have cut-outs, and dresses and skirts that fell below my knees. And, came up pretty much empty-handed.

So, I went shopping. And, couldn't find anything.

It's because most Western dress that I would want to wear, is provocative in some way. Trends often reflect the shifting focus on different erogenous zones, selecting what is to be concealed and revealed to maximize the beauty of the female form.

Hydrating masks from TheFaceShop will be my skin's best friends in the desert. Alas, I forgot my sunscreen at home!

So, if I found a top with a high neckline, I'd turn it around and find a low-cut back. A lot of sleeves today have cut-outs to show more skin. Many tops are so long that shorter girls like me are wearing them as dresses that are about an inch or two away from impropriety.

All I found were a few cast-off long skirts—no doubt discarded for being unsexy—from Goodwill. I dug some more at home and cobbled together five days worth of garments that might pass muster when worn with scarves, and I also figured I could wear leggings under some tunic-style dresses.

There was one shirtdress I dug out of a suitcase, and I wondered why I never wore it. Was it too tight?

Nope. I tried it on and it fit in all the right places, but, it was too long by about four inches and I never got around to hemming it, so the length made it perfect for Dubai.

Only problem was, to my eye and sense of proportion, it was too long, so it stayed at home.

There's appropriateness in terms of cultural mores, and appropriateness by fashion's rules, and this time, fashion won. I'll see how it all works out.

Furla Fall-Winter 2016 at RHC

April 20th, 2016
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PHOTOS COURTESY FURLA

Furla's Valentina Camouflage handbag is among the brand's recently launched Fall/Winter 2016 designs.

Furla hosted an exclusive preview of its Fall-Winter 2016 handbag collection April 21 at its Royal Hawaiian Center store. In town for the special event was the company's CEO Scott Link, to share some of the new design directions.

The new Furla bags are influenced by music, from the rebellion of from rock to fun of pop, reflected through laser cuts, kaleidoscopic patterns, golden studs, and fringe, starting with leathers smooth, supple and soft to the touch.

Bags such as the Furla Valentina and Furla Club also make a statement about our times, where constant exposure to stimuli and other cultures are prompting artists to create new aesthetic harmonies.

Furla's Club Bag.

Furla's Metropolitan Bolero.

furla

Ikebana heralds spring at NM

March 9th, 2016
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PHOTO COURTESY NEIMAN MARCUS

Sheets of pink and red plastic were cut and manipulated with heat to accompany an ikebana anthurium arrangement to be featured in Neiman Marcus's Jonathan Adler shop.

During a three-day celebration of spring, art, fashion and flowers, Neiman Marcus will host a free Sogetsu Ikebana Exhibition by Sensei Linda Hamasaki and her 40 students of Sogetsu School of Ikebana, March 11 through 13.

The Japanese flower arranging displays will integrate the latest Neiman Marcus spring fashions, many featuring red, the color of the season.

The ikebana creations will incorporate local tropical plants, seasonal flowers and some spring flowers flown in from Japan. In addition, Joyce “Seika” Tomonari will be highlighting a sculpture designed by the late artist Michael Tom. The metal sculpture, entitled “House that Held the Sun” is from her personal art collection.

Each level in the store will house several large-scale arrangements by Sensei Hamasaki and her advanced students. The center aisle in Gift Galleries on Level Three will also serve as the “Sogetsu Gallery” housing 11 smaller arrangements.

A directory of the pieces will be available to guide guests through the store to view all of the arrangements.

Exhibition hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. March 11, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. March 12, and noon to 5 p.m. March 13.

Also, while in the store, enjoy the "Art of Fashion," informal modeling of the latest Spring 2016 trends throughout the store from noon to 2 p.m. today through March 14.

Other spring events:

Dolce & Gabbana Spring 2016: View the designers' latest collection inspired by the style and culture of Italy through the eyes of foreign tourists from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 10 to 12. Enjoy Italian-inspired refreshments and informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. March 11 and 12. In Designer Sportswear, Level Two.

Maria Canale for Forevermark: Meet the jewelry designer from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 10 to 12 and view her latest jewelry pieces, along with a special collection of rough diamonds available for purchase. In Precious Jewels Salon, Level One. Here's a link to my post about Canale's last visit to Hawaii: http://fashiontribe.staradvertiserblogs.com/2013/01/04/1905/

Eileen Fisher event: View the Spring 2016 Collection from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 11 and 12,
and enjoy informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. both days, in Sport Shop, Level Two.

Milly event: View the latest collection and receive a gift with a qualifying purchase, between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. March 11 and 12, in Sport Shop, Level Two.

Prom event: View some of spring’s best evening gowns 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 12, and pick up prom ideas during informal modeling from noon to 2 p.m. There will be gown and wardrobe consultations, as well as makeover tips for prom season. Customers will receive a clutch with a qualifying purchase that day. Consultation appointments are limited; call 948-3444.

Louis Vuitton Ala Moana introduces 'Haute Maroquinerie'

April 23rd, 2014
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Ala MoanaThe newly renovated Louis Vuitton store at Ala Moana Center made room for its Haute Maroquinerie bespoke handbags for those who want a hand in creating their own signature purse.David Franzen Photography

Louis Vuitton reopened its expanded Ala Moana Center store with an early morning blessing April 19, before the center opened.

The expansion allowed the arrival of LV's Haute Maroquinerie, with a special salon for afficionados of made-to-order leather goods, one of the few select LV boutiques offering the bespoke service worldwide.

The one-of-a-kind handbag personalization service offers clients the ability to select one of five shapes in two different sizes, with a palette of 26 colors in eight different types of leather, as well as hardware.

Ala MoanaThe store's new look.

lvdivaNadine Kam photos
This little pom, Diva, loves being toted around in LV.

lvpupDiva's human, Noelle Sasaki.

lv leathersThose seeking a personalized  'Haute Maroquinerie' handbag start by selecting one of five designs, available in two sizes, then has a choice of 26 colors and eight different styles of leather.

lvhardwareThen comes hardware selection.

The shapes available are:

>> Noé: Designed by Gaston Louis Vuitton in 1932 to carry champagne bottles.
>> Triangle: Created in 1934 to carry knit works.
>> Lock-it: A 1958 design that owes its name to the expression used when protecting ones’ precious belongings.
>> Milaris: One of two contemporary designs.
>> Neo Steamer: Trapeze-shaped original introduced in 2011.

Louis Vuitton's relationship with Hawaii dates back 32 years, when Ala Moana Center became home to its first freestanding store in Hawaii.

Valérie Chapoulaud-Floquet, President and Chief Executive Officer of Louis Vuitton Americas, noted, “Louis Vuitton has accompanied travelers to Hawaii since early 1880. Hawaii is one of our most vibrant markets with sophisticated global clients who appreciate the value of luxury.”

To commemorate the grand reopening, LV partnered with Hawaiian artist, dancer and cultural expert Sig Zane, to design artwork for the store’s vestibules. The hand-carved ilima design—honoring the history of the area—is accompanied by Zane's original Hawaiian chant, "Ka Lanakila Pio," expressing a love story between Louis Vuitton and Hawaii. The poem is written on kapa that resembles the Louis Vuitton damier pattern, with Hawaiian symbols of spear, pathway, waves and mountains.

In addition to women's leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes, accessories and jewelry, the expanded store carries a greater assortment of menwear and accessories.

For the opening, Louis Vuitton also created a limited edition Monogram Idylle pendant necklace, in 18k white gold necklace with sapphire pendant.

lvzaneFrom left, Brandy Serikaku, Kuhao Zane and Sig Zane in one of the vestibules bearing the artwork they created in collaboration with Paris artisans.

blessingThe store is blessed before employees and guests enter.

lvblessEmployees hands-on involvement with blessing the store.

lvmenPicture This! Photography
Part of the new menswear department.

lvfashThe reoriented staircase to the store's second floor. (more…)